Syllabus
Institutional Pharmacy Practice

Institutional Pharmacy Practice

PHRA-1349

Fall 2010
08/23/2010 - 12/12/2010

Course Information

Section 002
Distance Learning
ONL EVC
Laura Shields
lshields@austincc.edu
(512) 223.1790 x26431

Section 002
Laboratory
EVC9 9223
Laura Shields
lshields@austincc.edu
(512) 223.1790 x26431

Office Hours

  • W
    6 pm - 7 pm
    EVC Adunct Office, Bldg 9000, 2nd Floor, or Pharmacy Lab, EVC Bldg 9000, Room 9223
    Other office hours by appointment
    Office hour location is based on student need and preference.

Course Requirements

Course Requirements and Attendance Policy

 

Attendance

Attendance is required.  Students will sign-in at every class meeting. Your signature constitutes your presence.  The student is required to notify an instructor if an absence is anticipated.   A student who is five (5) minutes late is considered tardy.  Three (3) tardies constitute one absence.  It is the student’s responsibility to keep track of his/her attendance record and for all assignments, materials, examinations, etc., missed.  Students who miss more than three class sessions, with exception to documented medical or family emergencies may be dropped from the course.  Students who miss more than three class sessions will receive a one letter grade reduction to their overall grade for each class session missed.

 Course Prerequisites

Insitutional Pharmacy does not have prerequisite classes.  The class may be taken at any point during the Pharmacy Technology Program.

 

        Major Assignments:

All assigned work is expected to be completed.  All components of the class work together to maximize student knowlege and experience.  The student will be prepared, and capable of understanding technician responsibilities, when beginning  practicum in the institutional setting at class conclusion.

 

       Writing Assignments:  The class includes two writing assignments, totalling 10% of the final lecture grade.  

The first  assignment is designed to familiarize the students with drugs frequently seen in the institutional setting.  The student will be assigned one to two drugs to research;  each report to be a minimum of 2 pages long, with an additional page for a complete bibliography.

The second assignment covers medication errors.  The assignment is to re-inforce the prevalence of medication errors, and their personal responsibility in preventing medication errors.  The report will focus on causes, prevention measures, tracking methods, and outcomes.

 

    Other Assignments:

It is the student’s responsibility to turn in work on time.  Check the syllabus/course schedule for the due date for all   assignments.  Assignments should be submitted via the digital dropbox in  Blackboard unless otherwise indicated.      Assignments must be formatted in a Microsoft Word Document (*.doc), all other assignments will be returned and        are subject to late penalties.   All assignments are due at the beginning of class, or no later than 11 pm on the due date  for Blackboard assignments.   

 

Lecture -  will include weekly assignments which will cover the information from each lecture, for a total of twelve assignments.  A calculation assignment, to prepare the student for 'real-life' pharmaceutical mathematics in the institutional setting, is included.

Lab -  assignments will consist of hands-on practical experience of common duties a hospital pharmacy technician is expected to perform.   Each lab will be repeated several times to reinforce practice ability and understanding of  the task. Each assignment will be followed by a short quiz, to review task knowledge. 

Order Highlighting - A total of six order highlighting assignments will be completed by the student.  This assignment prepares the pharmacy technician in order reading comprehension, order triage, and medication order entry.  Assignments 2-6 will include questions on each order that require research into medications being ordered to expand knowledge of proper drug strengths, dosaging and uses. 

 

       Examinations

The Pharmacy Technician Program at Austin Community College has adopted a uniform testing policy. There will be no retests. If a student misses one exam for a documented medical or family emergency, the grade of the final exam will be averaged in the place of the missed exam grade. If any other exams are missed or if an exam is missed for any other reason, a grade of "0" will be given.

 

If use of a calculator is permitted on an exam, students are only permitted to use a silent, hand-held, non-programmable calculator without a fraction key. Calculators must only be battery or solar powered. Students using cell phones and other calculators are considered cheating.  No notes are allowed on exams.

  

The class will include two lecture examinations, one midterm, and a comprehesive final.  Lab section will include two examinations, one midterm, and a comprehensive final.

Lecture examinations will review student comprehension of the academic knowledge required of pharmacy technicians in today's world; how institutional pharmacy operates, pharmacy technician duties, and how the technician functions are set under law, statute, and regulations.  

Lab examinations will review student comprehension of the practical knowledge and skills required in the institutional setting.  Students must demonstrate understanding, and use o,f institutional tools:  hospital logs and other  various  pharmacy  forms (floor stock requests, crash cart logs, etc) and methodology of pharmacy technician skills.

The mid-terms will cover the first eight chapters of lecture, and the total amount of completed labs to that date.

The finals are comprehensive, and will cover all information discussed in lecture and performed lab. 

           

 

           

          

Readings

Textbook

Pharmacy Practice for Technicians, Fourth Edition– Ballington and Anderson (ISBN 978-0-76383-460-9)

Pharmacy Labs for Technicians- Sparks and McCartney (ISBN 978-0-76383-484-5) 

 

All required readings will be assigned, as noted in the syllabus.

Course Subjects

Pharmacy Practice for Technicians, Fourth Edition– Ballington and Anderson 

Lecture 1:  Chapter 1 - The Profession of Pharmacy

Describing the origins of pharmacy, differentiating among various kinds of pharmacy, enumerate the functions of the pharmacist, educational curriculum for today's pharmacy student, duties and work environments of pharmacy technicians.

 

Lecture 2:  Chapter 2 - Pharmacy Law, Regulations, and Standards

Distinguish among laws, regulations, professional standards, major impacts on pharmacy profession by major pieces of  statutory federal law in the twentieth century, the role of the FDA, DEA, OSHA, US Phamacopeial Convention, national and state boards of pharmacy, discuss duties legally performed by pharmacy technicians in most states, discuss the importance of drug and professional standards.

 

Lecture 3:  Chapter 3:  Pharmacology in Practice

Define the term drug and distinguish between active and inert ingredients. Identify several scientific discoveries of medications that improved our quality and quantity of life. Categorize drugs by source as natural, synthetic, synthesized, or semisynthetic.  Explain the uses of drugs as therapeutic, pharmacodynamic, diagnostic, prophylactic, and destructive agents.  Explain the parts of the National Drug Code Number (NDC). 

 

Lecture 4:  Chapter 4 - Dosage Forms and Routes of Administration

Define the term drug and distinguish between active and inert ingredients.  Identify several scientific discoveries of medications that improved our quality and quantity of life.  Categorize drugs by source as natural, synthetic, synthesized, or semisynthetic.  Explain the uses of drugs as therapeutic, pharmacodynamic, diagnostic, prophylactic, and destructive agents.  Explain the parts of the National Drug Code Number (NDC).  Define and differentiate between the terms dosage form and route of administration.  Enumerate and explain the properties of solid, semisolid, liquid, inhalation, and transdermal dosage forms.  Differentiate among the various delayed-release dosage formulations.  List the major routes of administration and the advantages and disadvantages associated with each route of administration.  Discuss correct techniques for administration of injections. 

 

Lecture 5:  Chapter 5 - Pharmaceutical Measurements and Calculations

Describe four systems of measurement commonly used in pharmacy, and convert units from one system to another.  Explain the meanings of the prefixes most commonly used in metric measurement.  Convert from one metric unit to another (e.g., grams to milligrams).  Convert Roman numerals to Arabic numerals.  Convert time to 24 hour military time.  Convert temperatures to and from the Fahrenheit and Celsius scales.  Round decimals up and down.  Perform basic operations with proportions, including identifying equivalent ratios and finding an unknown quantity in a proportion. Convert percentages to and from fractions, ratios, and decimals.  Perform fundamental dosage calculations and conversions.  Solve problems involving powder solutions and dilutions.  Use the alligation method to prepare solutions.  Calculate the specific gravity of a liquid. 

 

Lecture 6:  Chapter 8 - Nonsterile Pharmaceutical Compounding

Define the term compounding, describe common situations in which compounding is required, and identify examples of nonsterile compounding.  Review and follow good compounding practices in the pharmacy.  Distinguish terminology, such as manufactured product vs. compounded preparation.  Describe the classifications and functions of a hospital and the role of the director Identify quality standards for nonsterile compounding contained in USP Chapter 795, including product selection and beyond-use or expiration dating.  Distinguish the components and purpose of a master control record from a compounding log.  Understand and calculate common mathematical problems that occur in a compounding pharmacy.  Identify and describe the equipment used for the weighing, measuring, and compounding of pharmaceuticals.  Explain the proper technique for weighing pharmaceutical ingredients, measuring liquid volumes, and compounding nonsterile preparations.  Define the term percentage of error and understand how the concept relates to accuracy in the compounding pharmacy.  Explain the common methods used for comminution and blending of pharmaceutical ingredients.  Discuss the techniques by which solutions, suspensions, ointments, creams, powders, suppositories, and capsules are prepared.  Identify the steps that are necessary in the compounding process.  Identify references with a specialty focus on compounding. 

 

Lecture 7:  Chapter 9 - Hospital Pharmacy Practice

Describe the classifications and functions of a hospital and the role of the director of pharmacy.  Identify services that are unique to a hospital pharmacy in contrast to a community pharmacy.  Contrast a medication order with a unit dose profile.  Identify the advantages of a unit dose drug distribution system.  Explain the proper procedure for repackaging of medications.  Identify the process of medication dispensing and filling in a hospital pharmacy.  Discuss the advantages of an automated floor stock system for medication, including narcotics.  Describe specialty services, such as intravenous admixtures and total parenteral nutrition.  Describe a medication administration record (MAR).  Identify the roles of major hospital committees.  Describe the role of the institutional review board (IRB) in approving investigational drug studies.  Explain the major role and standards of the Joint Commission.  Discuss the role of automation and inventory control in the hospital.

 

Lecture 8:  Chapter 10 -  Infection Control

Explain the role of pathogenic organisms in causing disease.  Distinguish among bacteria, viruses, fungi, and protozoa.  Discuss the advantages and disadvantages of various forms of sterilization.  Identify sources and prevention of common causes of contamination.  Discuss the importance of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) guidelines on preventing the transmission of infectious disease within the hospital.  Contrast hand washing and hand hygiene practices when in a sterile work environment.  Discuss the importance of vaccinations for healthcare workers.  Contrast a manufactured sterile product with expiration dating vs. a compounded sterile preparation (CSP) with beyond-use dating according to USP Chapter 797 guidelines.  Identify procedures to minimize airborne contamination with CSPs.  Apply contamination risk level designations and appropriate beyond-use dating for CSPs.  Identify the role of the infection control committee.  List common universal precautions to protect hospital employees 

 

Lecture 9:  Chapter 11 - Preparing and Handling Sterile Products and Hazardous Drugs

Identify two common methods of delivering IV preparations.  Describe common characteristics of intravenous solutions including, solubility, osmolality, and ph.  Identify common vehicles for intravenous solutions.  Identify the difference between large volume and small volume Parenteral solutions.  Discuss the preparation of TPN, frozen products, and closed system transfer devices (CSTDs). Differentiate expiration dating and beyond-use dating.  Identify the role and function of equipment used in IV preparation and administration, including catheters, controllers, syringes, needles, IV sets, and filters.  Identify the components of an intravenous administration set.  Calculate intravenous flow rates.  Discuss the importance of quality assurance. 

 

Lecture 10:  Chapter 12 - Medication Safety

Understand the extent of medical and medication errors and their effects on patient health and safety.  Identify specific categories of medication errors.  List examples of medication errors commonly seen in pharmacy practice settings.  Apply a systematic evaluation to search for medication error potential to a pharmacy practice model.  Define strategies, including use of automation, for preventing medication errors.  Identify the common systems available for reporting medication errors. 

 

Lecture 11:  Chapter 13 - Human Relations and Communications

Explain the role of the pharmacy technician as a member of the customer care team in a pharmacy.  State the primary rule of retail merchandising.  Identify and discuss desirable personal characteristics of a pharmacy technician.  Identify the importance of verbal and nonverbal communication skills.  Provide guidelines for proper use of the telephone in a pharmacy.  Identify and resolve linguistic and cultural differences in working with a customer.  Identify and resolve problems related to mental and physical disabilities in working with a customer.  Define discrimination and harassment, and explain the proper procedures for dealing with these issues.  Identify examples of professionalism in the pharmacy.  Explain the importance of managing change and being a team player in the pharmacy.  Explain the appropriate responses to rude behavior on the part of others in a workplace situation.  Define the role of pharmacy personnel in emergency situations in the community.  Identify and discuss the important areas of the regulations of the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA).  Discuss the importance of protecting patient privacy in the pharmacy.

 

Lecture 12:  Chapter 14 - Your Future in Pharmacy Practice

Define and differentiate the terms licensure, certification, and registration.  Define ethics and discuss characteristics of ethical behavior.  Identify ethical dilemmas that may occur in pharmacy practice.

  

 

 

Student Learning Outcomes/Learning Objectives

End of Course Outcomes

            CIP 510805 WECM End of Course Outcomes- Demonstrate a working knowledge of the health care institution and pharmacy department and the organizational and communication systems; utilize medical and pharmaceutical terminology; describe the importance of environmental safety standards, pharmacy safety, and personal safety and hygiene; specify routes of administration including mechanical, automatic, or robotic drug delivery systems; explain the importance of utilizing pharmacy resource materials; and outline the major functions of pharmacy supply and inventory control.

 

Learning Objectives

Describe the origins of pharmacy.

Differentiate among the various kinds of pharmacies.

Describe four stages of development of the pharmacy profession in the twentieth century.

Enumerate the functions of the pharmacist.

Discuss the educational curriculum for today’s pharmacy student.

Discuss the main objectives of the American Society of Hospital Pharmacists (ASHP) model curriculum for pharmacy technician training.

Explain the licensing requirements for pharmacists.

Identify the duties and work environments of the pharmacy technician.

Distinguish among laws, regulations, professional standards, and ethics.

List and describe the major impacts on the profession of pharmacy by major pieces of statutory federal drug law in the twentieth century.

Discuss the role of the Food and Drug Administration, the Drug Enforcement Administration, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, the United States Pharmacopeial Convention, and the national and state boards of pharmacy.

Enumerate the duties that may legally be performed by pharmacy technicians in most states.

Discuss the importance of drug and professional standards.

Define the term drug and distinguish between active and inert ingredients.

Identify several scientific discoveries of medications that improved our quality and quantity of life.

Categorize drugs by source as natural, synthetic, synthesized, or semisynthetic.

Explain the uses of drugs as therapeutic, pharmacodynamic, diagnostic, prophylactic, and destructive agents.

Explain the parts of the National Drug Code Number (NDC).

Define and differentiate between the terms dosage form and route of administration.

Enumerate and explain the properties of solid, semisolid, liquid, inhalation, and transdermal dosage forms.

Differentiate among the various delayed-release dosage formulations.

List the major routes of administration and the advantages and disadvantages associated with each route of administration.

Discuss correct techniques for administration of injections.

Describe four systems of measurement commonly used in pharmacy, and convert units from one system to another.

Explain the meanings of the prefixes most commonly used in metric measurement.

Convert from one metric unit to another (e.g., grams to milligrams).

Convert Roman numerals to Arabic numerals.

Convert time to 24 hour military time.

Convert temperatures to and from the Fahrenheit and Celsius scales.

Round decimals up and down.

Perform basic operations with proportions, including identifying equivalent ratios and finding an unknown quantity in a proportion.

Convert percentages to and from fractions, ratios, and decimals.

Perform fundamental dosage calculations and conversions.

Solve problems involving powder solutions and dilutions.

Use the alligation method to prepare solutions.

Calculate the specific gravity of a liquid.

Define the term compounding, describe common situations in which compounding is required, and identify examples of nonsterile compounding.

Review and follow good compounding practices in the pharmacy.

Distinguish terminology, such as manufactured product vs. compounded preparation.

Describe the classifications and functions of a hospital and the role of the director Identify quality standards for nonsterile compounding contained in USP Chapter 795, including product selection and beyond-use or expiration dating.

Distinguish the components and purpose of a master control record from a compounding log.

Understand and calculate common mathematical problems that occur in a compounding pharmacy.

Identify and describe the equipment used for the weighing, measuring, and compounding of pharmaceuticals.

Explain the proper technique for weighing pharmaceutical ingredients, measuring liquid volumes, and compounding nonsterile preparations.

Define the term percentage of error and understand how the concept relates to accuracy in the compounding pharmacy.

Explain the common methods used for comminution and blending of pharmaceutical ingredients.

Discuss the techniques by which solutions, suspensions, ointments, creams, powders, suppositories, and capsules are prepared.

Identify the steps that are necessary in the compounding process.

Identify references with a specialty focus on compounding.

Describe the classifications and functions of a hospital and the role of the director of pharmacy.

Identify services that are unique to a hospital pharmacy in contrast to a community pharmacy.

Contrast a medication order with a unit dose profile.

Identify the advantages of a unit dose drug distribution system.

Explain the proper procedure for repackaging of medications.

Identify the process of medication dispensing and filling in a hospital pharmacy.

Discuss the advantages of an automated floor stock system for medication, including narcotics.

Describe specialty services, such as intravenous admixtures and total parenteral nutrition.

Describe a medication administration record (MAR).

Identify the roles of major hospital committees.

Describe the role of the institutional review board (IRB) in approving investigational drug studies.

Explain the major role and standards of the Joint Commission.

Discuss the role of automation and inventory control in the hospital

Explain the role of pathogenic organisms in causing disease.

Distinguish among bacteria, viruses, fungi, and protozoa.

Discuss the advantages and disadvantages of various forms of sterilization.

Identify sources and prevention of common causes of contamination.

Discuss the importance of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) guidelines on preventing the transmission of infectious disease within the hospital.

Contrast hand washing and hand hygiene practices when in a sterile work environment.

Discuss the importance of vaccinations for healthcare workers.

Contrast a manufactured sterile product with expiration dating vs. a compounded sterile preparation (CSP) with beyond-use dating according to USP Chapter 797 guidelines.

Identify procedures to minimize airborne contamination with CSPs.

Apply contamination risk level designations and appropriate beyond-use dating for CSPs.

Identify the role of the infection control committee.

List common universal precautions to protect hospital employees.

Identify two common methods of delivering IV preparations.

Describe common characteristics of intravenous solutions including, solubility, osmolality, and ph.

Identify common vehicles for intravenous solutions.

Identify the difference between large volume and small volume Parenteral solutions.

Discuss the preparation of TPN, frozen products, and closed system transfer devices (CSTDs). Differentiate expiration dating and beyond-use dating.

Identify the role and function of equipment used in IV preparation and administration, including catheters, controllers, syringes, needles, IV sets, and filters.

Identify the components of an intravenous administration set.

Calculate intravenous flow rates.

Discuss the importance of quality assurance.

Understand the extent of medical and medication errors and their effects on patient health and safety.

Identify specific categories of medication errors.

List examples of medication errors commonly seen in pharmacy practice settings.

Apply a systematic evaluation to search for medication error potential to a pharmacy practice model.

Define strategies, including use of automation, for preventing medication errors.

Identify the common systems available for reporting medication errors.

Explain the role of the pharmacy technician as a member of the customer care team in a pharmacy.

State the primary rule of retail merchandising.

Identify and discuss desirable personal characteristics of a pharmacy technician.

Identify the importance of verbal and nonverbal communication skills.

Provide guidelines for proper use of the telephone in a pharmacy.

Identify and resolve linguistic and cultural differences in working with a customer.

Identify and resolve problems related to mental and physical disabilities in working with a customer.

Define discrimination and harassment, and explain the proper procedures for dealing with these issues.

Identify examples of professionalism in the pharmacy.

Explain the importance of managing change and being a team player in the pharmacy.

Explain the appropriate responses to rude behavior on the part of others in a workplace situation.

Define the role of pharmacy personnel in emergency situations in the community.

Identify and discuss the important areas of the regulations of the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA).

Discuss the importance of protecting patient privacy in the pharmacy.

Define and differentiate the terms licensure, certification, and registration.

Define ethics and discuss characteristics of ethical behavior.

Identify ethical dilemmas that may occur in pharmacy practice.