Syllabus
Human Growth and Development

Human Growth and Development

PSYC-2314

Fall 2010
08/23/2010 - 12/12/2010

Course Information

Section 014
Lecture
TTh 10:35AM - 11:55AM
EVC8 8107.0
Marie Walker

Office Hours

  • T
    12:00 - 1:00
    EVC 8115
    Other office hours may be available by appointment. Email me at mwalker1@austincc.edu or call at 751-4884 (8:00 AM to 8:00 PM).

Course Requirements

 

Human Growth and Development

Psychology 2314 Lecture/Section Number 014

Synonym/Unique #: 19400
Fall, 2010

T/Th 10:35-11:55 AM

EVC 8107

 

INSTRUCTOR: Marie Walker, Ph.D.

E-Mail: mwalker1@austincc.edu

COURSE DESRIPTION:

Human Growth and Development surveys how we grow and change throughout our lives, from conception through death. Using lectures, small and large group discussions, and media presentations, we will explore physical/biosocial, cognitive, and psychosocial development, and also consider the impact of cultural and environmental influences on our understanding of the lifespan. At it's heart, this course is designed to provide valuable information that will help you better understand and interact with people of all ages and stages of life.

 COURSE OBJECTIVES: 

  • develop a better understanding of major stages of life

  • increase awareness of how context influences development

  • increase understanding of methods used to study lifespan changes

  • challenge you to think critically and apply course information to your interactions with people of all ages

  • have fun! 

TEXT:  Berger, K.S. (2008). The Developing Person Through the Lifespan, 7th ed. New York: Worth Publishers. ISBN-13: 978-0-7167-6072-6. Available at ACC Bookstores and online at www.coursesmart.com.

PREREQUISITE:  PSYC 2301 (waived for Health Science students)

GRADING:

Grades for this course will be assigned based on a combination of your participation, a class project, reading responses, and four exams.

Class participation and in-class activities 75 points

Children Around the World Project 25 points

Reading Responses (10) 100 points

Exams (3) 100 points

Total: 300 points 

Class Participation: 25% of final grade (up to 75 points).

The honor of your presence is requested! Participation in this class is required and attendance will be monitored. Your success in this class depends on consistent attendance and pre-class preparation. In order to participate, you must be present. In order to participate well, you will need to read the assigned chapters in your text ahead of time, think about them, and be prepared with questions or comments. If you are unable to attend class regularly, please drop this course and enroll in an independent study or distance learning class.

Throughout the semester, points will be awarded based on participation in unannounced class activities and thoughtful comments made in class. If you are absent, you cannot earn participation points. Participation points cannot be made-up prior to or after the day of an in-class activity. Also, if you are absent any days during the semester, it is your responsibility to obtain notes from a classmate.

Any student who does not consistently attend class will not receive participation points.

Children around the World Project: 8 1/3% of final grade (up to 25 points).

The lives of children are inextricably linked to the environments in which they develop and live. In order to gain awareness of the conditions of children around the world and get experience in information gathering, you will be responsible for gathering information about a specific country (to be determined in class). You will collect information regarding birth norms (e.g., childbirth practices, family leave), childcare, prevalence of poverty, early education opportunities, and the status of women of a specific country. As part of the assignment, you will list and evaluate your sources of the information. This portion of the assignment will be worth 20 points. Finally, you will write a two page response to the information you gathered—comparing the lives of the children in the country you researched to your life in the United Sates. This portion of the assignment will be worth 5 points. Your report and response should be submitted in a folder. Additional instructions will be provided.

Reading Responses: 33 1/3% of final grade (up to 100 points).

You are required to complete and submit ten (10) reading responses throughout the semester. Each reading response will be one full page and is worth 10 points. Because you have flexibility regarding when you choose to do Reading Responses, no late responses will be accepted. For more information, please see the “What is a Reading Response” section at the end of this Syllabus. 

Your efforts will have (at least) three positive results: 

  • To do reading responses, you will need to read the text assignment weekly. This will help you prepare for class activities, allow you to ask questions about anything you don't understand, and reduce the need for cramming before tests.

  • As you think about how the subject matter relates to your history or your plans, the new information will become more meaningful and you will be more likely to remember important points.

  • Your comments will better help me to structure class time to better serve your learning experience. 

Students who do not do Reading Responses will not pass the course.

Exams: 33 1/3% of final grade (up to 100 points).

Four multiple choice format exams will be given in class. Each exam will cover information from your text and from class material (e.g., lectures, films, activities).  

Material from your textbook may or may not be covered in class.

You are responsible for ALL information on the assigned text pages.

 Make-up exams and exam appeals: If you need to take a make-up exam, you must notify me (via e-mail or phone call) no later than the day of the exam that you will miss. Make-up exams must be taken at the testing center as close to the original exam date as possible. Any exam question appeals must be presented in writing within one week after the exam grades are posted. 

If you score lower than 70% on any exam, you are required to meet with me the week after the exam during office hours. 

Final Grades:

A's are earned for excellent work (90% or better of all possible points); B's for above average work (80-89%); C's for average work (70-79%); D's for below average work (60-69%); and F's for unacceptable work (below 60%).

CLASS POLICIES:

 The following policies, along with your active participation, will help insure a good class experience. 

  • Please demonstrate respect toward your fellow students and me throughout the course.

  • Be ready to begin on time (i.e., in your seat, prepared to participate, with cell phones off).

  • Please do not leave the room during class unless it is absolutely necessary.

  • Please use appropriate language and correct labels for issues discussed in class.

  • Be open-minded. Obtaining new information and building learning skills is why you're here!

  • Computers may only be used for not-taking during class—no web surfing! 

COURSE COMMUNICATIONS:

I invite you to see me during my office hours. This is time I set aside specifically to answer questions or advise you regarding the class. If you need to meet with me at a time other than office hours, you must make an appointment. 

If you need to speak with me regarding class issues outside of office hours or class, don't hesitate to call me. My home number is listed on the top of the syllabus. Please call between the hours of 8:00 AM and 8:00 PM. I am happy to help you. 

Please feel free to e-mail me at any time with course-related questions. Please put PSY2314 and your last name at the beginning of the subject line to prevent your message from being filtered into junk mail. All e-mails sent to me past 5:00 PM will be read the next day. This includes the day before exams. 

During the semester, I will communicate with the class using group e-mails. My messages will go to your ACCmail address. If you do not use ACCmail, it is your responsibility to forward your ACCmail messages to the address you read frequently. Not accessing e-mail regularly could be a significant disadvantage in this course.   

What is a Reading Response?

A Reading Response is your opportunity to write about the material you are reading in this course. The assignment is to write a personal response to the material assigned for the week. Some students write about a single topic while others write about multiple subjects from the reading assignment.

Your response may include, but is not limited to, writing about:

1. How the assigned reading applies to a situation or an event you (or someone you know) experienced

2. How the material is related to something you learned in another course

3. How the material is related to something you saw in a film or read about in a book

4. How the information in the text changed how you think about a subject

 5. Caution: a summary of information from the textbook is NOT an acceptable response.

What is the format for Reading Responses?

Reading responses must be a minimum of one FULL typed page with 1” margins (see example). Paragraphs should be double spaced. Your reading response should use only one page of paper. No cover sheet is used. If you need more than one page to complete your thoughts, please print double-sided or reduce point size (no smaller than 10 point).

Do I need to check my spelling and use correct grammar?

Yes! The ability to express your thoughts clearly in writing is very important. Correct spelling and grammar help the reader understand your ideas better. Therefore, your responses should be written with correct spelling and grammar. Writing Tip: After you write your response, read it out loud. This will help you make sure that what you wrote is what you meant to say.

Can I e-mail a copy of my Reading Response?

No. Reading Responses must be submitted in writing. So, make sure your printer has ink, your pet doesn’t eat your print out, your computer doesn’t crash, etc. If you don’t have a computer at home, check out the resources on campus.

When are responses due?

You must submit 10 Reading Responses before the end of the semester. Responses may only be submitted on Tuesdays. Your first Reading Response is due August 31. Write responses every week until you’ve completed all 10.

What if I’m still not sure how to do a Reading Response?

See me in office hours or give me a call.

READING RESPONSE FORMAT EXAMPLE 

Name/Class time (e.g., Marie Walker/T/Th 10:35 AM)

Reading Response #X (Chapter X)

Please note, each reading response should be one FULL page of text. The box, shown here, is not necessary, but it does show where the text edges should be on your paper. If you complete one idea, pick another from the assigned pages. Also, be sure you check the syllabus for your assigned topic before you complete your response.

All reading assignments are to be completed before the class during which we will discuss the material. Please allow yourself enough time to read and think about the material. While reading, actively think about the text, how it applies to you and those around you and how it relates to other areas of your life and knowledge. Make connections—it improves your memory and understanding.

Reading response paragraphs contain your response to the information you read—your thoughts, curiosity, critiques, insights, new questions you wondered about, connections to other areas in your life, and/or emotional responses. Concentrate on connecting the new material with something you already know. Set your margins to .5” (top) and 1” (left, right, bottom). Double-space paragraphs. Do not summarize. See me in office hours or call if you have questions.

All reading assignments are to be completed before the class during which we will discuss the material. Please allow yourself enough time to read and think about the material. While reading, actively think about the text, how it applies to you and those around you and how it relates to other areas of your life and knowledge. Make connections—it improves your memory and understanding.

Reading response paragraphs contain your response to the information you read—your thoughts, curiosity, critiques, insights, new questions you wondered about, connections to other areas in your life, and/or emotional responses. Concentrate on connecting the new material with something you already know. Set your margins to .5” (top) and 1” (left, right, bottom). Double-

Readings

Reading Assignments are listed in bold under Chapters/Assignments.

 

Class Date

Subject(s)

Chapters/Assignments

(Due on class date)

8/24

8/26

Introductions and Starting Points,

Methods

Review Syllabus

Read 1, 2

8/31

9/2

Theories,

Prenatal Development

Response #1: Topic of your choice from Ch. 1-3; Read 3 & 4, and Review 1 & 2

9/7

9/9

Childbirth

Reading Response #2: Your Birth Story (due Thursday); Review 1-4

9/14

9/16

Review, Exam 1 (9/16)

Chapters 1-4, plus lecture materials

Review for Exam

9/21

9/23

The First 2 Years

Reading Response #3: Topic of your choice from Ch. 5-7; Read 5, 6, 7

9/28

9/30

The Play Years

Reading Response #4: Spanking;

Read 8, 9, 10, and Review 5-7

10/5

10/7

The School Years

Reading Response #5: Topic of your choice from Ch. 11-13; Read 11, 12, 13, and Review 5-10

10/12

10/14

Review, Exam 2 (10/14)

Exam 2: Chapters 5-13 plus lecture materials

Children Around the World Project

Review for Exam

10/19

10/21

Adolescence

Reading Response #6: Topic of your choice from Ch. 14-16; Read 14, 15, 16, and Work on Project

10/26

10/28

Emerging Adulthood

Reading Response #7: Topic of your choice from Ch. 17-19; Read 17, 18, 19, Review 14–16, and Work on Project

11/2

11/4

Review, Exam 3 (11/4)

Exam 3: Chapters 14-19 plus lecture materials

Review for Exam and Work on Project

11/9

11/11

Adulthood

Reading Response #8: Topic of your choice from Ch. 20-22; Read 20-22, and Work on Project

11/16

11/18

Late Adulthood

PROJECT DUE

Reading Response #9: Topic of your choice from Ch. 23-25; Read 23, 24, 25, and Review 20-22

11/23

11/25

Independent Work Day – No Class

Holiday (Thanksgiving) – No Class

Review notes from chapters 1-22

11/30

12/2

Good Life Stories,

Death and Dying

Reading Response #10: Good Life Story; Read Epilogue, and Review 20-Epilogue

12/7

12/9

Review, Exam 4 (12/9), & Closure

Ch. 20-25, Ep., plus lecture material

Projects Returned and Review for Exam

 I reserve the right to alter the schedule when necessary.

Course Subjects

Lecture and discussion subjects are listed below under "Subject(s)."

 

Class Date

Subject(s)

Chapters/Assignments

(Due on class date)

8/24

8/26

Introductions and Starting Points,

Methods

Review Syllabus

Read 1, 2

8/31

9/2

Theories,

Prenatal Development

Response #1: Topic of your choice from Ch. 1-3; Read 3 & 4, and Review 1 & 2

9/7

9/9

Childbirth

Reading Response #2: Your Birth Story (due Thursday); Review 1-4

9/14

9/16

Review, Exam 1 (9/16)

Chapters 1-4, plus lecture materials

Review for Exam

9/21

9/23

The First 2 Years

Reading Response #3: Topic of your choice from Ch. 5-7; Read 5, 6, 7

9/28

9/30

The Play Years

Reading Response #4: Spanking;

Read 8, 9, 10, and Review 5-7

10/5

10/7

The School Years

Reading Response #5: Topic of your choice from Ch. 11-13; Read 11, 12, 13, and Review 5-10

10/12

10/14

Review, Exam 2 (10/14)

Exam 2: Chapters 5-13 plus lecture materials

Children Around the World Project

Review for Exam

10/19

10/21

Adolescence

Reading Response #6: Topic of your choice from Ch. 14-16; Read 14, 15, 16, and Work on Project

10/26

10/28

Emerging Adulthood

Reading Response #7: Topic of your choice from Ch. 17-19; Read 17, 18, 19, Review 14–16, and Work on Project

11/2

11/4

Review, Exam 3 (11/4)

Exam 3: Chapters 14-19 plus lecture materials

Review for Exam and Work on Project

11/9

11/11

Adulthood

Reading Response #8: Topic of your choice from Ch. 20-22; Read 20-22, and Work on Project

11/16

11/18

Late Adulthood

PROJECT DUE

Reading Response #9: Topic of your choice from Ch. 23-25; Read 23, 24, 25, and Review 20-22

11/23

11/25

Independent Work Day – No Class

Holiday (Thanksgiving) – No Class

Review notes from chapters 1-22

11/30

12/2

Good Life Stories,

Death and Dying

Reading Response #10: Good Life Story; Read Epilogue, and Review 20-Epilogue

12/7

12/9

Review, Exam 4 (12/9), & Closure

Ch. 20-25, Ep., plus lecture material

Projects Returned and Review for Exam

 I reserve the right to alter the schedule when necessary.

Student Learning Outcomes/Learning Objectives

CHAPTER LEARNING OBJECTIVES

After reading the text and attending class, students will be able to:

 Chapter 1 Introduction

  • Define the study of human development.

  • Describe Bronfenbrenner's ecological-systems theory and its importance in understanding the multiple influences on the developing individual.

  • Discuss the multicultural nature of human development.

  • List and describe the basic steps of the scientific method.

  • Describe three basic research designs used by developmental psychologists.

  • Define and give examples of correlation (positive, negative, and zero)

Chapter 2 Theories of Development 

  • Define developmental theory, noting the differences between grand and emergent theories.

  • Discuss the major focus of psychoanalytic theories, and describe the conflicts that occur during Freud's psychosexual stages.

  • Describe the crises of Erikson's theory of psychosocial development, and contrast them with Freud's stages.

  • Discuss the major focus of behaviorism, and explain the basic principles of classical and operant conditioning.

  • Identify the primary focus of cognitive theory, and briefly describe Piaget's stages of cognitive development.

  • Explain the significance of scaffolding and the zone of proximal development in supporting cognitive growth.

  • Discuss the basic concepts and techniques proposed by Vygotsky in his sociocultural theory of development.

  • Explain the nature-nurture controversy.

 Chapter 3 Heredity and Environment

  • Identify the mechanisms of heredity.

  • Describe the process of conception and the first few hours of development.

  • Describe how the Human Genome Project is attempting to uncover the mechanisms of genetic interaction.

  • Differentiate genotype from phenotype, and distinguish between monozygotic and dizygotic twins.

  • Discuss the interaction of genes and environment.

  • Identify common genetic disorders.

  • Describe situations in which couples should seek genetic testing and counseling.

  • Identify tests used in prenatal diagnosis and describe their purposes.

 Chapter 4 Prenatal Development and Birth

  • Outline causes of infertility.

  • Describe the significant developments of the germinal, embryonic, and fetal periods.

  • Discuss and identify teratogens and describe their effects on the developing embryo.

  • Discuss protective steps that may be taken to prevent the damaging effects of teratogens.

  • Discuss the benefits of prenatal care.

  • Describe the birth process.

  • Discuss the concept of parent-infant bonding and it's importance to the baby and family.

 Chapter 5 The First Two Years: Biosocial Development 

  • Describe overall growth of the first two years.

  • Discuss why infants sleep so much, and describe how sleep patterns change through infancy.

  • Discuss the attitudes of different cultures about where infants sleep.

  • Distinguish among sensation, perception, and cognition.

  • Describe the basic reflexes of the newborn, and distinguish between gross motor and fine motor skills.

  • Identify key factors in the worldwide decline in childhood mortality over the last century.

  • Identify risk factors and discuss possible explanations for ethnic group variations in the incidence of sudden infant death syndrome.

  • Describe the nutritional needs of infants.

  • Discuss the causes and results of malnutrition in the first years.

 Chapter 6 The First Two Years: Cognitive Developmental

  • Identify and describe Piaget's six stages of sensorimotor intelligence.

  • Explain what object permanence is and when it develops.

  • Describe language development during infancy and identify its major hallmarks.

  • Discuss the use of sign language with children who are hearing impaired as well as those with normal hearing.

  • Differentiate three theories of language learning, and explain current views on language learning.

 Chapter 7 The First Two Years: Psychosocial Development 

  • Describe the basic emotions expressed by infants during the first days and months.

  • Describe the main development in the emotional life of the child between 6 months and 2 years.

  • Discuss psychological theories of infant development, including those of Freud and Erikson.

  • Examine temperament and its stability over time.

  • Explain the origins of temperament as an interaction of nature and nurture.

  • Define attachment and identify factors that predict secure or insecure attachment.

  • Discuss the concept of social referencing.

  • Discuss the impact of nonmaternal care on young children, and identify the factors that define high-quality day care.

 Chapter 8 The Play Years: Biosocial Development 

  • Describe normal physical growth during the play years.

  • Discuss brain maturation during this developmental period.

  • Distinguish between gross and fine motor skills, and discuss the development of each during the play years.

  • Discus the significance of artistic expression during this developmental period.

  • Describe gender differences in play patterns and discuss influences on these differences.

  • Explain what is meant by “injury control” and its significance during the play years.

  • Identify the various categories of child maltreatment and discuss factors that contribute to it.

  • Discuss the consequences of maltreatment.

Chapter 9 The Play Years: Cognitive Development

  • Describe and discuss the major characteristics of Piaget's stage of preoperational thought, and identify a major limitation of Piaget's research.

  • Explain Vygotsky's views on cognitive development.

  • Explain the typical preschool child's theory of mind, noting how it is affected by context and culture.

  • Describe the development of vocabulary and grammar during the play years, noting limitations, in the young child's language abilities.

  • Discuss the advantages and disadvantages of bilingualism at an early age.

  • Debate the value of a preschool education for a child v. remaining home with a primary caretaker.

Chapter 10 The Play Years: Psychosocial Development

  • Discuss the emergence of “self” from the perspective of various developmental theorists.

  • Explain how and why children develop empathy or antipathy, and describe the behaviors produced by each type of emotion.

  • Discuss the development of gender awareness.

  • Compare and contrast three classic patterns of parenting and their effect on children.

  • Discuss the pros and cons of punishment, and describe effective methods for disciplining a child.

  • Discuss how exposure to the electronic media contributes to the development of violence in children and interferes with family life. 

Chapter 11 The School Years: Biosocial Development 

  • Describe normal physical growth and development during middle childhood.

  • Discuss the problems of obese children in middle childhood, and describe best approaches for treating obesity.

  • Explain how achievement and aptitude tests are used in evaluating individual differences in cognitive growth, and discuss why use of such tests is controversial.

  • Discuss the characteristics of learning disabilities and outline the process for assessing a child for learning differences.

  • Discus theories of multiple intelligences, and explain the significance of these theories.

  • Describe the symptoms and treatment of attention deficit disorder and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.

  • Describe how stimulants and antidepressants work, and discuss the use and misuse of of prescription drugs in treating childhood disorders.

  • Discuss potential accommodations for children with special needs. 

Chapter 12 The School Years: Cognitive Development 

  • Discuss Vygotsky's views regarding the influence of the socioculture context on learning during middle childhood.

  • Explain the logical operations of concrete operational thought (Piaget).

  • Describe the components of the information-processing system, noting how they interact to support progress in cognitive functioning.

  • Discuss advances in control processes, especially selective attention and metacognition, during middle childhood.

  • Describe the best approaches to bilingual education.

  • Identify the factors that play a role in the relationships between socioeconomic status and language learning.

  • Describe cultural and national variations in the academic skills that are emphasized, and explain the concept of a hidden curriculum.

  • Compare academic performance of children in the US with those in other countries, and discuss the etiology of these differences.

  • Differentiate several approaches to teaching reading and math, and discuss evidence regarding the effectiveness of these methods.

  • Discuss variations of schooling that have recently been promoted. 

Chapter 13 The School Years: Psychosocial Development 

  • Discuss the importance of peer groups to the development of school-age children.

  • Outline Kohlberg's stage theory of moral development and discuss criticisms of it.

  • Discuss how friendships change during the school years.

  • Identify groups of unpopular children and discuss the etiology of the peer group rejection and what can be done about it.

  • Discuss the special problems of bullies and their victims, and describe possible ways of helping such children.

  • Identify the essential ways in which functional families nutrure school-age children.

  • Differentiate various family structures and discuss the impact different family structures have on children.

  • Describe the development of self-concept during middle school.

  • Discuss the concept of resilience.

  • Identify several factors that seem especially important in helping children cope with stress.

Chapter 14 Adolescence: Biosocial Development 

  • Outline the biological events of puberty.

  • Identify several factors that influence the onset of puberty.

  • Discuss adjustment problems of boys and girls who mature earlier or later than their peers.

  • Describe physical growth during adolescence in both males and females.

  • Describe the development of the brain during adolescence.

  • Explain why the brain's immaturity and uneven development partly accounts for adolescent risk-taking.

  • Discuss the adolescent's preoccupation with body image and the problems that sometimes arise.

  • Discuss the potential problems associated with early sexual activity.

  • Discuss sexual abuse and identify ways to reduce its prevalence.

  • Discuss drug use and abuse among adolescents. 

Chapter 15 Adolescence: Cognitive Development 

  • Describe evidence of formal operational thinking during adolescence.

  • Discuss egocentrism, and explain adolescents' use of illogical, intuitive thought even when they are capable of logical thought.

  • Discuss the impact of ego- and task-involvement learning.

  • Evaluate the typical secondary school's ability to meet the cognitive needs of the typical adolescent.

  • Debate the impact of academic tracking on students.

  • Explain how adolescent thinking contributes to the high incidence of adolescent pregnancy and sexually transmitted disease.

  • Discuss cultural influences on sex education. 

Chapter 16 Adolescence: Psychosocial Development

  • Describe the development of identity during adolescence and problems encountered in identity formation.

  • Describe parental influence on identity formation, including the effect of parent-adolescent conflict.

  • Explain the constructive functions of peer relationships and close friendships during adolescence and the unique challenges faced by immigrants.

  • Discuss the development of male-female relationships during adolescence, including the challenges faced by gay and lesbian adolescents.

  • Discuss the various influences on teen sexual behavior, including peers, parents, and schools, and describe current trends in teen sexual behavior.

  • Discuss adolescent suicide, noting contributing factors and gender, ethnic, and national variations.

Chapter 17 Emerging Adulthood: Biosocial Development

  • Describe the physical changes in growth during early adulthood.

  • Identify age-related trends in sexual attitudes about the purpose of sex.

  • Discuss trends in exercise and nutrition among emerging adults.

  • Describe the typical victims of anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa, and discuss possible explanations for these disorders.

  • Discuss the benefits and costs of risk-taking among emerging adults, noting the attraction of “living on the edge.”

  • Discuss the causes and consequences of drug abuse during emerging adulthood.

Chapter 18 Emerging Adulthood: Cognitive Development 

  • Describe three approaches to the study of adult cognition.

  • Identify the main characteristics of postformal thought, and tell how it differs from formal operational thought.

  • Define dialectical thought, and give examples of its usefulness.

  • Discuss the effects of culture on cognition.

  • Examine changes in moral reasoning during adulthood.

  • Describe the six stages of faith outlined by James Fowler.

  • Discuss the relationship between cognitive growth and higher education. 

Chapter 19 Emerging Adulthood: Psychosocial Development 

  • Explain how the viewpoint of most developmentalists regarding identity formation has shifted.

  • Discuss the development of ethnic and vocational identity.

  • Review the developmental course of friendship during adulthood.

  • Identify Sternberg's three components of love, and discuss the pattern by which they develop in relationships.

  • Discuss the impact of cohabitation on relationships, and identify factors that influence marital success.

  • Describe the different forms of domestic violence.

  • Describe the role of family in the development of the emerging adult, noting both positive and negative effects.

  • Discuss the origins of substance abuse, depression, anxiety disorders, and schizophrenia.

Chapter 20 Adulthood: Biosocial Development 

  • Identify the typical physical changes of middle adulthood and discuss their impact.

  • Describe the relationship between health and lifestyle factors.

  • Identify the typical changes that occur in the sexual-reproductive system during middle adulthood.

  • Explain the concepts of quality-adjusted life years and disability-adjusted life years.

  • Explain how variations in health are related to gender and socioeconomic status. 

Chapter 21 Adulthood: Cognitive Development

  • Distinguish between fluid and crystallized intelligence, and explain how each is affected by age.

  • Differentiate the three fundamental forms of intelligence described by Sternberg.

  • Outline Gardner's theory of intelligence.

  • Discuss the roles of age and cultural and historical context in determining which type of intelligence is most valued.

  • Describe how the cognitive processes of experts differ from those of novices. 

Chapter 22 Adulthood: Psychosocial Development 

  • Describe the psychosocial tensions and goals of adulthood.

  • Explain how the social clock influences the timing of important events during adulthood, and discuss the problems with the concept of the midlife crisis.

  • Describe the Big Five cluster of personality traits.

  • Explain the tendency toward gender role convergence during adulthood.

  • Discuss the importance of the social convoy in protecting adults against the effects of stress.

  • Describe how and why marital relationships tend to change during adulthood, and discuss whether these patterns apply to same-sex couples.

  • Discuss the impact of divorce and remarriage during adulthood.

  • Discuss the concept of “sandwich generation.”

  • Describe how the balance among work, family, and self often shifts during adulthood.

Chapter 23 Late Adulthood: Biosocial Development 

  • Define ageism, and discuss factors that contribute to ageism in our society.

  • Discuss primary and secondary aging in relation to diseases in old age, and discuss the importance of good health habits for successful aging.

  • Differentiate between optimal, normal, and impaired aging.

  • List several characteristic effects of aging on the individual's appearance, noting how the aged see themselves.

  • Discuss theories of aging, including the wear-and-tear and genetics approaches.

  • Identify lifestyle characteristics associated with the healthy, long-lived adult. 

Chapter 24 Late Adulthood: Cognitive Development 

  • Review research findings regarding changes in both sensory and working memory during late adulthood.

  • Discuss research findings regarding changes in the older adult's ability to access the knowledge base and to use control processes efficiently.

  • Define dementia and describe its stages.

  • Discuss the problem with identifying the cause of dementia in an older adult.

  • Identify and describe the two most common organic causes of dementia.

  • Describe the causes of subcortical dementias, and explain how symptoms of dementia can sometimes be reversed or slowed through proper treatment. 

Chapter 25 Late Adulthood: Psychosocial Development 

  • Discuss integrity v. despair, and describe how the search for identity continues into old age.

  • Describe how older adults use selective optimization to cope with aging.

  • Discuss theories of psychosocial development during late adulthood.

  • Describe the components of the social convoy, and explain this convoy's increasing importance during late adulthood.

  • Discuss how, and why, marriage relationships tend to change as people grow old.

  • Describe gender differences in the experience of losing a spouse.

  • Describe the frail elderly, and explain why their number is growing.

  • Describe the typical case of elder abuse. 

Chapter 26 Epilogue: Death and Dying

  • Discuss the various meanings of death over the life span.

  • Describe some religious and cultural variations in how death is viewed and treated.

  • Identify Kubler-Ross's stages of dying, and discuss these stages in light of more recent research.

  • Explain the concept of palliative care, focusing on the advantages and disadvantages of hospices.

  • Discuss the steps that patients, family members, and medical personnel can take to plan for “a good death.”

  • Discuss issues surrounding euthanasia.

  • Describe recent changes in the mourning process, and identify several specific problems that may become pathological.