Syllabus
English Composition I

Syllabus Sections

Publish Date

02/06/2011 19:38:55

English Composition I

ENGL-1301

Spring 2011
01/18/2011 - 05/15/2011

Course Information

Section 058
Lecture
Th 6:00PM - 8:40PM
PIN1 412
Odie Lindsey

Office Hours

  • T
    6 - 7
    PIN 607
    Also by appointment, post-class, and via the Pinnacle Learning Lab

Course Requirements

 

English 1301     Spring 2011     TH, 6-8:40 p.m     Section 058    Room 412, PIN

Professor O. Lindsey

Office:  607 Pinnacle

Office Hours:  M, 3-4 p.m., or by appointment

Course Objectives:  From the English Department Comp I Course Syllabus: “The goals of Composition I are to promote critical thinking, reading, and writing; clear, coherent, confident, and effective communication; collaborative writing and learning.”  Indeed.  We’re going to read, to write, to discuss—closely—and we’ll get out of here ready to tackle college writing and beyond.  We’ll learn about rhetorical styles, about the promotion of fact over opinion, about organization, research, and editing.  We’ll learn about plagiarism (though the most important thing to learn is that if you plagiarize, you fail).  We’ll work with each other, respectfully, and this work will pay off.

Required Texts and Supplies:

The McGraw-Hill Reader: Issues across the Disciplines, Muller, 11th ed.

Easy Writer: A Pocket Reference, Lunsford, 4th ed.

Lined notebook with perforated (removable) paper

Composition I folder from the ACC bookstore

Papers:  You will complete 4 papers.  Each will be graded as “Accepted,” “Edit,” “Revise,” or “Rewrite.”  (See attached English Dept. Syllabus for details).  You must receive a mark of “Accepted” on every paper in order to pass the class.  You will have two chances to rewrite/revise each paper.

            Paper 1:  Expressive/Literary Essay  (350-400 words)

            Paper 2:  Persuasive Essay   (550-600 words)

            Paper 3:  Research Paper  (1000-1200 words)

            Paper 4:  Textual Analysis  (800-900 words)

Paper Format:  Type All Papers.  Follow MLA format guidelines exactly. (See Easy Writer p. 246 for basic example).  Don’t email your papers unless otherwise approved by me.  Turn them in.  On time.  Times New Roman, 12-point font.  You must staple all drafts together. 

Grades:  Alongside earning the grade of “Accepted” on all papers, you must maintain a C in the class (participation, reading response, in-class writing, quizzes, paper deadlines), in order to take the C Test.  You may not begin one paper until the previous paper has been marked “Accepted.” 

C Test/Departmental Exam: This is a handwritten, analytical essay that must be completed in one of the ACC Testing Centers.  750-850 words.  Completing this fulfills the minimum requirement (a grade of C) for the course.

B and A Papers:  The B and A papers are take home assignments/essays.  You must receive an “Accepted” on the C Test before you may attempt these assignments.  You must also maintain the corresponding in-class average.  (As-in, if you do C work in class, and barely pass the C Test, you don’t automatically qualify to write B or A papers.)  If the B paper is graded as “Accepted” you may attempt the A.  Both papers must be 1,000 words.  If marked “Rewrite” you will have one chance to resubmit each paper.  We will discuss these later in the semester.

Prerequisite:  Per ACC, in order to attend this class you must meet one of the following conditions:  1) TSI exempt Writing, 2) An essay score of 6 on the writing portion of a TSI approved test (or a 5 if you took the test prior to September, 2010, or, 3) a minimum grade “C” in DEVW 0330 or ESOL 0384 Course Type: T.  If you have not met one of these requirements you will need to drop this class and take Writing Skills II. 

Attendance:  Your presence and input are both valuable, and crucial to our success.  Come to every class ready to contribute to the discussion.  You may miss 3 classes and still earn a C.  More than 3 and you will not receive credit.  Be on time.  Turn off your phone.  Your laptop.  Not your brain. 

Homework:  You are responsible for each week’s homework.  (Again, come to class prepared and ready to discuss readings, prepared to take a quiz, and with any questions.)  If you miss a class, be sure and contact either a fellow student or myself to check on any potential adjustments to the syllabus. 

Withdrawal:  You must complete 3 (of 4) “Accepted” papers by April 21 or you will be required to drop the class.  The last day to drop classes is April 25.

Learning Lab / Office Hours:  We will discuss the Learning Lab policy in class.  You may drop your papers off to me there, and I am of course available for tutoring.  (There are several other tutors on hand as well.)  However, do not interrupt if I am working with another student.  The lab is first come, first serve—to all students.  Please do visit office hours with any questions, concerns, to discuss grades, readings, etc.

Key Online Resources:

*Purposes and Patterns website: http://www.austincc.edu/writing/purposes/index.html

*Purdue Online Writing Lab: http://owl.english.purdue.edu/

*ACC Learning Lab: http://www.austincc.edu/tutor/

*ACC English Department: http://www.austincc.edu/english/

*The Info Game: http://library.austincc.edu/help/infogame/start.htm

 


 

ENGLISH 1301 (DEPARTMENT SYLLABUS)

 

COMPOSITION I COURSE SYLLABUS

 

 

Course Description

ENGLISH 1301 is a study of the principles of composition with emphasis on language, the mechanics of writing, types of discourse, and research and documentation.

 

Course Objectives

The goals of Composition I are to promote

•  critical thinking, reading, and writing;

•  clear, coherent, confident, and effective communication;

•  collaborative writing and learning.

 

Course Outcomes

Upon completion of English 1301, students should be able to

  identify rhetorical purposes and methods of organization appropriate to topic, thesis, and                audience;

•  collect, read, analyze, and use information from a wide range of sources;

•  write a coherent essay observing appropriate grammatical, mechanical, and stylistic

    conventions;

•  evaluate, edit, and revise at all stages of the writing process.

   

Requirements

All students in all sections will write between five and nine essays over the course of the semester, including an essay written under supervision in the Testing Center, known as the Departmental Exam, which must be passed to pass the course with a minimum grade of “C.”Of these essays, one will be a research paper of at least 1000 words, and one will be a textual analysis.  The research paper will use MLA style and will require a minimum of three sources, including at least two different types of sources. The remaining essays will achieve at least two of the following rhetorical aims:  expressive, literary, referential, and persuasive.  Together, all papers will comprise a minimum of 3500 words.  In writing each essay, students will use one or more of the following methods of development:  cause and effect, comparison/contrast, classification, definition, description, illustration, narration, process analysis, and evaluation.  They will also complete The Info Game, http://library.austincc.edu/infogame.htm, an on-line information literacy program.  Instructors may also assign readings, quizzes, multiple drafts, and other activities that affect final grades.  Instructors will provide specific written guidelines for each assignment and may require part or all of at least one paper to be written under supervision.

 

Your instructor will use one of two systems of grading, or a combination of the two systems.

 

System 1: Accept/Edit/Revise/Rewrite

 

Students must receive “Accepted” on four to six essays to be eligible to receive a permit for taking the Departmental Exam.  Additional assignments are required for the grades of “B” and “A.”

 

Your final grade will be determined by the grade level you complete.  Each paper will be marked "ACCEPTED," "EDIT," "REVISE," or "REWRITE."  (You may submit only one paper at a time; when one is ACCEPTED,you may submit the next one.)  In addition, compliance with your instructor's point system for deadlines and activities may determine your eligibility for a grade of "B" or "A."

 

     ACCEPTED:the paper fulfills the objectives of the assignment and is relatively free of                                           grammatical, spelling, and punctuation errors. 

    

     EDIT:  the paper fulfills the objectives of the assignment but contains errors.  You must

                 avoid similar errors in subsequent papers in order to progress in the course.   

    

     REVISE:   the paper needs improvement in style, organization, or development. 

 

     REWRITE:  the paper does not fulfill the objectives of the assignment.  

 

"B" Requirement:   Write an essay according to guidelines provided by your instructor.  Minimum length: 1000 words.  Your instructor may provide an alternative assignment.  The “B” paper will be evaluated “Accept” or “Rewrite” only.

 

"A" PAPER:   Following guidelines provided by your instructor, write an essay using two or more sources on a similar topic.  Minimum length:  1000 words.  MLA Documentation required.  The “A” paper will be evaluated “Accept” or “Rewrite” only.

 

System 2: Letter Grades

 

Your instructor will assign letter or number grades to some or all required essays.  Students will be given the opportunity to draft and revise each required essay assignment one or more times (instructor will determine how many times and how final grade will be awarded).  Students will also be required to pass the Departmental Exam (see description below) in the Testing Center to pass the course with a minimum grade of “C.”  Your instructor’s grading system will be explained in detail in his or her individual course syllabus.

 

The Departmental Exam

 

The Departmental Examwill be taken under supervision in the Testing Center.  Given a selection to read, you will write an interpretive essay of at least 750 words analyzing the selection. Thisessaywill be evaluated "ACCEPTED" or "RETEST" only.  If you do not pass on the first try, you may retest twice.  Your essay must include a summary, analysis, and evaluation and must demonstrate the following: 

 

•   coherence, critical thinking, and an understanding of the selection's thesis,

       purpose(s), and method(s) of organization;

 •   adherence to stylistic, grammatical, and mechanical conventions

 

Enrollment in ENGL 1302 requires credit for 1301, or its equivalent, with a least a grade of “C.”  Instructor will verify.

 

Your instructor may establish deadlines by which you must complete a specific number of assignments or be subject to WITHDRAWALfrom the course.  It is your responsibility to know whether your instructor will withdraw you if you do not meet such deadlines.

 

NOTE:  You must provide your instructor with a Composition I File Folder (available in the bookstores) for your papers.  Your instructor will keep your folder for one semester following your enrollment.  You are responsible for making copies of any papers you want to keep for your files.     

 

Learning Lab Policy for “B” and “A” Papers

Departmental policy allows students to receive only very general assistance writing “B” and “A” papers in Composition I and II.  Examples of such assistance include pre-writing activities and review of writing principles and of grammar and documentation conventions in response to student questions.  In addition, individual faculty are free to prohibit students from seeking specific kinds of or any assistance on the “B” and “A” papers and may do so by sending a memo to the learning labs and by stipulating the restriction in class syllabi.

 

Scholastic Dishonesty

Acts prohibited by the College for which discipline may be administered include scholastic dishonesty (e.g., cheating on an exam or quiz, plagiarizing, and unauthorized collaboration with another in preparing outside work).  Academic work submitted by students shall be the result of their thought, research, or self-expression.  Academic work is defined as (but not limited to) tests and quizzes, whether taken electronically or on paper; projects, either individual or group; classroom presentations; and homework. 

 

Student Freedom of Expression

Each student is strongly encouraged to participate in class.  In any classroom situation that includes discussion and critical thinking, there are bound to be many differing viewpoints.  These differences enhance the learning experience and create an atmosphere where students and instructors alike will be encouraged to think and learn.  On sensitive and volatile topics, students may sometimes disagree not only with each other but also with the instructor.  It is expected that faculty and students will respect the views of others when expressed in classroom discussions.  

 

Students with Disabilities

Each ACC campus offers support services for students with documented physical or psychological disabilities.  Students with disabilities must request reasonable accommodations through the Office for Students with Disabilities on the campus where they expect to take the majority of their classes.  Students are encouraged to do this three weeks before the start of the semester.  

 

Withdrawal Policy

The Texas State Legislature passed a bill stating that students who first enroll in public colleges and universities beginning in fall 2007 and thereafter may not withdraw from more than six classes during their undergraduate college career.  See ACC Student Handbookfor further information.

 

 

 

Readings

 


Jan. 20 

Introductions.  Go over syllabus and Outline handout.  Purposes and Patterns website.  “A Writer’s Choices” in EW (12).  “Three Things” assignment/In-class work.

            HW:  Finish “Three Things” Paper.  Read: Alexie, “Superman and Me” from MH (580), and “Critical Thinking and Argument” from EW (25-38).                           

 

Jan. 27 

Three Things Paper due.  Paper One Assignment.  Discuss Readings.  Go over Thesis, Topic Sentence, Paper Format.  In class reading:  “Salvation” by Hughes, from MW (642). 

            HW:  Finish Paper 1 (with Outline).  Read “Exploring, Planning, Drafting” from EW (17-24), and “Find It, Fix It” from EW (1-10). 

 

Feb. 3  

Paper 1 Due  (submit with Outline).  Paper Two Assignment.  In class reading and analysis of “The Lonely, Good Company of Books” by Rodriguez, from MW (264). 

            HW:  Select Paper Two Topic.  Review Purposes and Patterns Website.  Read Manjoo and McCarthy essays in MW (148-151). 

 

Feb. 10 

Present Paper 2 topics.  Discuss readings.  (Purposes and Patterns Quiz?)  Introduction to MLA Documentation.   “Integrating Sources and Avoiding Plagiarism” from EW (197).

            HW: Read “The Death of Horatio Alger” by Krugman, MW (465), “Red, White, and Beer” by Barry, MW (534).  

 

Feb. 17 

Discuss readings.  In Class Reading “Writing to the World” and “Language that Builds” from EW (142). 

            HW:  Finish Paper 2 (with Outline). 

 

Feb. 24 

Paper 2 Due(submit with Outline).  Paper Three Assignment.  “Conducting Research” in EW (176).  Thesis statement review / How to select a research topic.

HW:  Complete “The Info Game” Online and Bring Certificate.  Bring Thesis statement to share in class. 

 

March 3 

Info Game Certificates Due.  Share/Discuss Thesis statement & topic ideas.  MLA Documentation Worksheet.  Take home writing assignment 

            HW:  Complete take home writing assignment (with Outline).  Read Bordo, in MW (723).   

 

March 10 

Take home assignment due (submit with Outline).  Discuss Reading.  Introduction to Appeals (Ethos, Pathos, Logos).  Research Paper questions/consult.

            HW:  Bring completed draft of Paper 3 for in-class workshop. 

 

March 17----------NO CLASS, SPRING BREAK------------

 

March 24

In Class Workshop / Library Hours

            HW: Finish Paper 3 (with Outline). 

 

March 31 

Paper 3 Due (with Outline).  Paper 4 Assignment.  Critical Analysis Exercise.  Purposes and Patterns review. 

           HW:  Bring completed draft of Paper 4 for in-class workshop.

 

April 7 

In Class Workshop.  Draft revisions.

           HW:  Finish Paper 4 (with Outline).

 

April 14  Paper 4 Due (with outline).  C Test Review.  Practice C Test.

 

April 21  C Test Review / Paper 4 Edits / C Test Permits 

**You Must Have Completed 3 “Accepted” Papers or Withdraw from Class** 

(April 25: Last Day to Withdraw)

 

April 28  C Test Permits  / B Paper Assignment

 

May 5  B Paper Assignments / A Paper Assignments

 

May 12  Last Scheduled Class.

 

May 15  Last Day to turn in A or B Papers

Course Subjects

 


Jan. 20 

Introductions.  Go over syllabus and Outline handout.  Purposes and Patterns website.  “A Writer’s Choices” in EW (12).  “Three Things” assignment/In-class work.

            HW:  Finish “Three Things” Paper.  Read: Alexie, “Superman and Me” from MH (580), and “Critical Thinking and Argument” from EW (25-38).                           

 

Jan. 27 

Three Things Paper due.  Paper One Assignment.  Discuss Readings.  Go over Thesis, Topic Sentence, Paper Format.  In class reading:  “Salvation” by Hughes, from MW (642). 

            HW:  Finish Paper 1 (with Outline).  Read “Exploring, Planning, Drafting” from EW (17-24), and “Find It, Fix It” from EW (1-10). 

 

Feb. 3  

Paper 1 Due  (submit with Outline).  Paper Two Assignment.  In class reading and analysis of “The Lonely, Good Company of Books” by Rodriguez, from MW (264). 

            HW:  Select Paper Two Topic.  Review Purposes and Patterns Website.  Read Manjoo and McCarthy essays in MW (148-151). 

 

Feb. 10 

Present Paper 2 topics.  Discuss readings.  (Purposes and Patterns Quiz?)  Introduction to MLA Documentation.   “Integrating Sources and Avoiding Plagiarism” from EW (197).

            HW: Read “The Death of Horatio Alger” by Krugman, MW (465), “Red, White, and Beer” by Barry, MW (534).  

 

Feb. 17 

Discuss readings.  In Class Reading “Writing to the World” and “Language that Builds” from EW (142). 

            HW:  Finish Paper 2 (with Outline). 

 

Feb. 24 

Paper 2 Due(submit with Outline).  Paper Three Assignment.  “Conducting Research” in EW (176).  Thesis statement review / How to select a research topic.

HW:  Complete “The Info Game” Online and Bring Certificate.  Bring Thesis statement to share in class. 

 

March 3 

Info Game Certificates Due.  Share/Discuss Thesis statement & topic ideas.  MLA Documentation Worksheet.  Take home writing assignment 

            HW:  Complete take home writing assignment (with Outline).  Read Bordo, in MW (723).   

 

March 10 

Take home assignment due (submit with Outline).  Discuss Reading.  Introduction to Appeals (Ethos, Pathos, Logos).  Research Paper questions/consult.

            HW:  Bring completed draft of Paper 3 for in-class workshop. 

 

March 17----------NO CLASS, SPRING BREAK------------

 

March 24

In Class Workshop / Library Hours

            HW: Finish Paper 3 (with Outline). 

 

March 31 

Paper 3 Due (with Outline).  Paper 4 Assignment.  Critical Analysis Exercise.  Purposes and Patterns review. 

           HW:  Bring completed draft of Paper 4 for in-class workshop.

 

April 7 

In Class Workshop.  Draft revisions.

           HW:  Finish Paper 4 (with Outline).

 

April 14  Paper 4 Due (with outline).  C Test Review.  Practice C Test.

 

April 21  C Test Review / Paper 4 Edits / C Test Permits 

**You Must Have Completed 3 “Accepted” Papers or Withdraw from Class** 

(April 25: Last Day to Withdraw)

 

April 28  C Test Permits  / B Paper Assignment

 

May 5  B Paper Assignments / A Paper Assignments

 

May 12  Last Scheduled Class.

 

May 15  Last Day to turn in A or B Papers