Syllabus
Engineering Physics II

Engineering Physics II

PHYS-2426

Summer 2011
05/23/2011 - 08/08/2011

Course Information

Section 004
Lecture
MW 12:00PM - 1:55PM
RRC2 2321.00
Karl Trappe
ktrappe@austincc.edu
(512) 223.4822

Section 004
Laboratory
MW 2:05PM - 4:00PM
RRC2 2324.00
Michael Burns
mburns1@austincc.edu

Office Hours

No office hours have been entered for this term

Course Requirements

Students:  Log in to the website:  https://quest.cns.utexas.edu and obtain a UTEID and create your password following instructions given on the site.  Next, re-logon and add yourself to the ACC Course 30099.  HW1 is available for you to download. Dr. Trappe

 

PHYS 2426 - ENGINEERING PHYSICS II      

SECTION # 004 AND SYNONYM: 30099

CREDITS:  (4-3-3)

INSTRUCTOR: Dr. Karl I. Trappe

LAB INSTRUCTOR: Dr. Michael Burns

COURSE DESCRIPTION: Calculus-based study of electricity and magnetism, geometric and physical optics, and modern Physics.  This is the second half to the calculus-based PHYS 2425/2426 sequence.

  PREREQUISITES:   1. PHYS 2425 or equivalent 

            2. Credit in MATH 2414 or its equivalent                                  

TEXT: Tipler, Physics for Scientists and Engineers, 6th edition

OTHER:  Scientific calculator

 

METHODOLGY:     Lecture/Lab.  (Note: may also include demonstrations, active learning methodologies, class discussion,  problem solving sessions etc.)

 

LECTURE: MW: 12:00-1:55 pm at RRC2 2321.00                                       

LAB: MW: 2:00-4:00 pm at RRC2 2324.00                                                            

OFFICE LOCATION:    RRC2 Adjunct Office                     

PHONE NUMBER:  RRC2 Adjunct Faculty Office 223-0000 

Home: 512-264-1616 (leave message-answered weekends only), send email to below address:                            

EMAILADDRESS:   (LECTURE) trappe@physics.utexas.edu

                                       (LAB) burns@phys.ufl.edu                                

OFFICE HOURS:  MW 11:00 AM- 12:00 Noon      

APPOINTMENT HOURS:  By arrangement

COURSE RATIONALE:  University calculus level physics course intended for majors in engineering, physics, chemistry, mathematics, computer science and other technical and scientific majors.  This course is intended to develop an overview of physics using calculus based models as well as problem solving and critical thinking. University calculus level physics course intended for majors in engineering, physics, chemistry, mathematics, computer science and other technical and scientific majors. 

COURSE OBJECTIVES: 

I. Lecture

1.  To develop the concepts and language of physics.

2.  To develop problem-solving processes involving mathematics, which includes calculus?

3.  To develop symbolic language and use of graphs and charts to communicate.

4.  To develop critical thinking. 

II.  Laboratory

1.  To strengthen the concepts and ideas introduced in class and show the link between theory and  experiment.

2.  To develop an awareness of and introduction to error analysis

3.   To develop experimental techniques.

4.   To develop the use of graphs and charts to communicate.

3.  To introduce the concepts of experimental design.

4.  To introduce technical writing through the process of formal lab reports.

5.  To develop critical thinking.

 

GRADING SYSTEM:

Tests (3 exams) 30%

 

Final Exam 20%

 

Homework 15%

 

Class Participation:

Attendance, notification, quizzes 5%

Animations (PhET, etc) 5%

 

Laboratories exactly 25%

 

[The final grade consists of .75 *Lecture + .25 * Lab where both the lecture and lab grade are out of 100.

***Make note of the following statement:

You must earn a grade of “C” or better in the laboratory portion of the course as well as a grade of “C” or better in the lecture portion of the course in order to earn a grade of “C” or better in the course. If you do not earn a grade of “C” or better in both the lecture and the laboratory sections of the course, then your grade for the course will be a “D” unless due to your overall course average you have earned an “F” for the course.


 

COURSE POLICIES:

 

ऀऀCourse Philosophy: I want you to succeed in this course. You are adult learners who are responsible for mature educational decisions. Some of you may find this uncomfortable. This is a college course where the minimal effort of 2 to 3 hours of additional study for each class of lecture is expected. Plan on expending that effort in each college class for which you are enrolled. Do not skimp on study time in this course. Plan your time wisely. A 12 hour course load should be the equivalent of a 48 hour per week job (more than most adults work each week).

 

 

Attendance is REQUIRED. Attendance is part of your active participation in your own learning process. Do not be absent without serious reason. You will be expected to email me (in advance when possible) of any necessary absence from class. Include a brief description of the extenuating circumstances. You will lose Class Participation points for failure to notify your instructor of your absence within 24 hours. My email is: trappe@physics.utexas.edu

 

In the pre-college environment, five (5) absences is considered justification for a grade of F during a long semester. The amount of independent study required for college course mastery makes three (3) absences excessive. During summer sessions, any absence is detrimental. Please plan your recreation around your commitment to your college success.

 

 

Withdrawals and Incompletes –Students should check the withdrawal dates for 100% refund, 70% refund and no refund. If there are personal circumstances, which warrant withdrawal, students are responsible for withdrawing themselves.

 

The following information is presumed accurate, but students are required to determine actual deadlines via the ACC website:

 

Important Summer Session Dates 2011:

Monday, May 23, 2011

Summer 2011 1st 5.5-, 9- and 11-week sessions begin

Monday, May 30, 2011

Memorial Day Holiday (College Closed)

Monday, June 06, 2011

Summer 2011 - Last day to request 70% refund for 11-week session

Friday, June 10, 2011

Summer 2011 - Last day to request 25% refund for 11-week session

Monday, July 04, 2011

Independence Day Holiday (College Closed)

Monday, July 25, 2011

Summer 2011 - Last day to reinstate/withdraw from 11-week session

Monday, August 08, 2011

Summer 2011 semester ends

 

Incomplete Rule: see incomplete rule in college catalog. Suffice it to say that a course grade of “incomplete” is a temporary grade, at best. Academically, the granting of an incomplete is considered “postponing the inevitable”, meaning, delaying the posting of a failing grade. This is because most incomplete grades are never made up by the student, and the grade reverts to a recorded F. Alternative methods of correcting incomplete grades are generally unacceptable to college administrations, ie, you can’t just finish the work under a new instructor during the next semester.

It is the recommendation of the Physical Sciences Task Force that instructors should not withdraw students or grant an incomplete except in the most extreme circumstances.

 

 

d. Scholastic Dishonesty: Scholastic Dishonesty: Acts prohibited by the college for which discipline may be administered include scholastic dishonesty, including but not limited to cheating on an exam or quiz, plagiarizing, and unauthorized collaboration with another in preparing outside work. Academic work submitted by students shall be the result of their thought, research or self-expression. Academic work is defined as, but not limited to tests, quizzes, whether taken electronically or on paper; projects, either individual or group; classroom presentations, and homework.

HOWEVER, in this class, homework is assigned with different values for each student. Your effort to help each other is a form of “peer instruction” which is valued by your instructor. This aspect of “community effort” will be discussed early in the course.

e. Academic Freedom: Students are free to disagree with instructors on matters of opinion or personal philosophy, and will incur no penalty from doing so. However, instructors will judge student work based upon its relation to the current state of mainstream scientific fact and theory students are allowed to voice opinions, concerns, complaints and suggestions to the instructor. However, it is up to the instructor to decide how to use the student’s comments to meet the class’s best interests.

f. Student Discipline: Matters of student disciple will be adjudicated by the instructor on a case-by-case basis, in conjunction with the Task Force Leader or Dean. Students may consult with the Office of Student Services or the Associate Dean at their campus on these matters.

g. Office with Student with Disabilities: Each ACC campus offers support services for students with documented physical or psychological disabilities.  Students with disabilities must request reasonable accommodations through the Office for Students with Disabilities on the campus where they expect to take the majority of their classes.  Students are encouraged to do this three weeks before the start of the semester

h. Safety Statement: “Health and safety are paramount values in science classrooms, laboratories and field activities. You are expected to learn, understand and comply with ACC environmental, health and safety procedures and agree to follow the ACC science safety policy. You are expected to conduct yourself professionally with respect and courtesy to all. Anyone who thoughtlessly or intentionally jeopardizes the health or safety of another individual will be immediately dismissed from the day’s activity, may be withdrawn from the class, and/or barred from attending future activities. Specific safety training will take place before most activities. If you are late and miss this training, you will not be able to participate in the activity. You can read the complete ACC science safety policy at: http://www2.austincc.edu/sci_safe/ .”

COURSE OUTLINE/CALENDAR

Attached as an appendix to the syllabus.

Relevant chapters from the text include the majority of materials in chapters 21 through 33 of the text. Literally, this translates to covering one to two chapters per week of class. There will also be 3 Tests and one Final Exam during this semester. NOTE: the specific pace will be adjusted to fit the course material, and observed mastery by the class. Regardless, all topics will be covered. A planning calendar will be provided.

 

Major exams will follow approximately one week from the completion of the specific material, except during the final week of the course.

Plan for lab activities: A minimum of one lab experiment per week will be scheduled. Some of the available lab time will be used to supplement the lecture. Attendance is required for the entire period, and “finishing early” is not an option. Any “extra” lab time should be devoted to course and lab mastery, write-ups, and even homework.

 

TESTING CENTER POLICY: Physics tests may not be given in the testing center except for make up tests. The testing center does not allow “open notes” during their proctoring of exams. Please do not miss exams.


 

Readings

 

TEXT: Tipler, Physics for Scientists and Engineers, 6th edition 

 

Relevant chapters from the text include the majority of materials in chapters 21 through 33 of the text. Literally, this translates to covering one to two chapters per week of class.

 

SEE COURSE SUBJECTS BELOW

Course Subjects

PHYS 2426 – Engineering Physics II

Required Topics

All instructors must cover the following sections from the approved Textbook, Tipler’s Physics for Scientists and Engineers, 6thed. These constitute the minimum course content. Any or all additional sections in the textbook, or additional supplementary material not covered in the textbook, may be added at the instructor’s discretion.

Synonym 30099, Section#004  Topics  (Tentative Schedule)

5/23/2011-5/25/2011 Ch. 21 The Electric Field I: Discrete Charge Distributions
21-1 Electric Charge
21-2 Conductors and Insulators
21-3 Coulomb’s Law
21-4 The Electric Field
21-5 Electric Field Lines
21-6 Motion of Point Charges in Electric Fields

6/1/2011 Ch. 22 The Electric Field II: Continuous Charge Distributions
22-1 Calculating E from Coulomb’s Law
22-2 Gauss’s Law
22-3 Using Symmetry to Calculate E with Gauss’s Law
22-4 Discontinuity of En
22-5 Charge and Field at Conductor Surfaces

6/6/2011 Ch. 23 Electric Potential
23-1 Potential Difference
23-2 Potential Due to a system of Point Charges
23-3 Computing the Electric Field from the Potential
23-4 Calculation of V for Continuous Charge Distributions
23-5 Equipotential Surfaces
23-6 Electrostatic Potential Energy

6/8/2011 Ch. 24 Capacitance
24-1 Capacitance
24-2 The Storage of Electrical Energy
24-3 Capacitors, Batteries, and Circuits
24-4 Dielectrics

6/13/2011-6/15/2011 Ch. 25 Electric Current and Direct-Current Circuits
25-1 Current and the Motion of Charges
25-2 Resistance and Ohm’s Law
25-3 Energy in Electric Circuits
25-4 Combination of Resistors
25-5 Kirchhoff’s Rules
25-6 RC Circuits

6/20/2011 TEST 1:  Chapters 21-25

6/22/2011 Ch. 26 The Magnetic Field
26-1 The Force Exerted by a Magnetic Field
26-2 Motion of a Point Charge in a Magnetic Field
26-3 Torques on Current Loops and Magnets

6/27/2011-6/29/2011 Ch. 27 Sources of the Magnetic Field
27-2 The Magnetic Field of Currents: The Biot-Savart Law
27-3 Gauss’s Law for Magnetism
27-4 Ampere’s Law
27-5 Magnetism in Matter

7/6/2011 Ch. 28 Magnetic Induction
28-1 Magnetic Flux
28-2 Induced EMF and Faraday’s Law
28-3 Lenz’s Law
28-4 Motional EMF
28-5 Eddy Currents
28-6 Inductance
28-7 Magnetic Energy
28-8 RL Circuits

7/11/2011 Ch. 29 AC Circuits
29-1 Alternating Current in a Resistor
29-2 Alternating Current Circuits
29-3 The Transformer
29-4 LC and RLC circuits without a Generator
29-5 Phasors
29-6 Driven RLC Circuits

7/13/2011 TEST2 Chapters 26-29

7/18/2011 Ch. 30 Maxwell’s Equations and Electromagnetic Waves
30-1 Maxwell’s Displacement Current
30-2 Maxwell’s Equations
30-3 The Wave Equation for Electromagnetic Waves
30-4 Electromagnetic Radiation

7/20/2011 Ch. 31 Properties of Light
31-1 The Speed of Light
31-2 The Propagation of Light
31-3 Reflection and Refraction
31-4 Polarization

7/25/2011-7/27/2011 Ch. 32 Optical Images
32-1 Mirrors
32-2 Lenses
32-3 Aberrations
32-4 Optical Instruments

8/1/2011 Ch. 33 Interference and Diffraction
33-1 Phase Difference and Coherence
33-2 Interference in Thin Films
33-3 The Two-Slit Interference Pattern
33-4 Diffraction Pattern of a Single Slit
33-5 Using Phasors to Add Harmonic Waves
33-7 Diffraction and Resolution
33-8 Diffraction Gratings

 

8/3/2011 TEST 3 Chapters 30-33

 

8/8/2011 FINAL EXAM (Comprehensive) Chapters 21-33

Student Learning Outcomes/Learning Objectives

 

COURSE OBJECTIVES: 

I. Lecture

1.  To develop the concepts and language of physics.

2.  To develop problem-solving processes involving mathematics, which includes calculus?

3.  To develop symbolic language and use of graphs and charts to communicate.

4.  To develop critical thinking. 

II.  Laboratory

1.  To strengthen the concepts and ideas introduced in class and show the link between theory and  experiment.

2.  To develop an awareness of and introduction to error analysis

3.   To develop experimental techniques.

4.   To develop the use of graphs and charts to communicate.

3.  To introduce the concepts of experimental design.

4.  To introduce technical writing through the process of formal lab reports.

5.  To develop critical thinking.