Syllabus
Film Appreciation

Film Appreciation

DRAM-2366

Summer 2012
05/29/2012 - 08/15/2012

Course Information

Section 001
Lecture
TTh 2:15PM - 5:20PM
EVC9 9225
Richard Cutler

Office Hours

No office hours have been entered for this term

Course Requirements

 

DRAM-2366-001: Film Appreciation

Summer 2012, Synonym-05012

EVC 9-9225, TTh 2:15 to 5:20 pm

 

Instructor: Richard Cutler, Ph.D. Office Hours: Th 5:30-6:30 pm, and by appointment. EVC 9215. Voice Mail: 223-1790  x 25839# or spell CutlerR rcutler@austincc.eduPleasecall me “Doctor.” That’s the correct way to address someone with a Ph.D.

 

Course Description: DRAM 2366 FILM APPRECIATION (3-3-2).Analysis of the visual, aural, dramatic, thematic, and structural aspects of motion pictures that best depict the cinematic art. Skills: E  Course Type: T

 

Required Text: Looking At Movies by Richard Barsam & David Monahan. 3rd edition. This edition can be found for under $15 used (online through used book sellers), making older editions not worth the possibility that they are not the best for you.

 

Objectives:

  • View and deconstruct films from a variety of interpretive perspectives: filmic, literary, and according to modern conventions of analysis.
  • Become aware of socio-economic/cultural conditions that are reflected in films;
  • Be introduced to scientific theories of perception;
  • Appreciate artistic and literary modes of expression (namely genre filmss) as vehicles for cultural values and ideology; but most importantly to become adept at
  • Critical ways of thinking about experience, life, reality, etc.

 

Instructional Methodology

 

Preparation: NO EXCUSE FOR NOT KNOWING WHAT YOUR ASSIGNMENTS ARE. Check your Gmail before class for changes. Then, go to Blackboard, check Announcements and the Class Schedule in the Assignments section. Plan at least an hour a day for readings in preparation for every class. Films shown in class will often be On Reserve at the EVC Library, Circulation Desk, For Library Use Only.

 

Class: study chapter and supplemental readings before class.

·        Cinematic and writing conventions are introduced in class. Take notes.

·        Use office hours to check that your notes are complete and that you understand.

·        View the entire film in/outside of class.

·        Discuss the film.

·        Write papers built upon classroom interaction & readings.

·        Whenever possible papers are due after the relevant chapter readings have covered the same material.

 

My lectures supplement the textbook. You may audio record my lectures and discussions

Analytical Tools:

Classical Hollywood Cinema (CHC) evolved over nearly 100 years. A film is a product of its age and the age it portrays. Its terms are widely used; its simple structure aids in systematic film analysis. Apply critical thinking to it and it produces substantive results.

 

Classroom Contributions/Presentations

Be prepared; consolidate your understanding of film theories and analytical tools by applying them in class. Participation creates learning. If not prepared to contribute, you may be assigned a focused reading and presentation to consolidate your learning. No extra credit. So, just do the assignments.

All papers must be typed and posted ONLINE before class. Turn in a hard copy before class begins on the DUE date. Please, for the sake of your grade, proof read your paper before final printing.

To insure you get the best grades on your writing, buy the textbook new, for with it comes an excellent guide to writing called, “Writing About Movies.” This key to A papers is also available used on line.

Use conventional format guidelines for your papers: single space your name, the assignment’s name, my name, the class, and the date at the top; for the essay itself, use 12-point type, double-spaced, all margins 1.25, number pages, and indent with no quotation marks around passages of 40 or more words.

Save your files like this: First InitialLast Name-Paper-#-Abbreviated Name of Assignment, and save as a .rtf file before attaching as an email. For example, my first paper on Bicycle Thief when attached to an email would look like this: RCutler-P-1-BThief.rtf

A paper submitted early or on-time may be rewritten once for a better grade, providing the revision is submitted on the due date or within one class period after the instructor returns it to the student. Late papers are permitted ONLY at the instructor’s discretion.

 

Grading Written assignments       Value*

* Idea                                                  = 2

* Logical Development                      = 2

* Thorough content coverage, facts, analysis, or summary/conclusion       = 2

* Grammar, punctuation and style     = 2

* Documentation (cites & sources)    = 2                               Total possible each paper                 =  10

 

Note: Chapter Review Questions are standing in for exams.

*A point roughly equals a grade. Thus, 9 + would be an A; a B is 8; C’s are 7, D 6, below 6 is an F.

 

 

 

 

Final Grade Scale:

A = Excellent (90 - 100 points)

B = Very Good (80 - 89)

C = Good (70 - 79)

D = Fair (60 - 69)

F = Poor (0 - 59)

 

Grading System:

5 papers @10 points each; throw

out 1                                           = 40

Citizen Kane paper/final            = 20

5 sets Qs & As: Ch’s 1-2, 3-4,

5, 6-7; 8-9. (5points/set)            = 25

Attendance/participation           = 10

Journal                                       = 05

            Total points                  = 100

 

 


Policies           Please READ THIS!!!

Preparation, Participation, Absence and Withdrawal.
 
Preparation: 5 points are given for being prepared for class and for Participation. 
 
Absence: Attendance is taken each class. If you miss class, check Blackboard for Announcements, Class Materials, and Schedule of Assignments changes. While I AM ALWAYS AVAILABLE TO ANSWER QUESTIONS about the assignments, please check your schedule of assignments before you ask me what you missed.in 2 hours & 15 minutes worth of class. Lectures are seldom posted to Blackboard because the class content often differs from the reading. If the lecture material was not covered in the assigned readings – as it often is not, ask a classmate to share notes. If you missed a film, view it before the next class. 
If you need to leave before instruction is over, common courtesy is to advise me BEFORE instruction begins; otherwise your sudden departure will disrupt the class. I will take it personally. If we have a field trip, you must complete a waiver and supply emergency contact information before any required field trip.

 

Withdrawal: If you cannot keep up with the schedule, you should consider withdrawing before the deadline in order to avoid a low grade.Do not simply quit coming to class. That lack of action affects your grade point. Withdrawal for whatever reason isyour responsibility.  Further, lack of attendance or work may result in your involuntary withdrawal from the class for the following:

  1. miss more than one paper due date; miss more than one set of Chapter Questions; or miss one paper and a set of chapter questions;
  2. if you are not completely caught up with missed the work (even if excused) by the withdrawal deadline. The ACC home page has a link to the Academic Calendar.

v     See STUDENT HANDBOOK: http://www.austincc.edu/handbook/acaguid7.htm#withdraw

v     Familiarize yourself with college rules and policies. They may affect you.

Academic Freedom: In any classroom situation that includes discussion and critical thinking, there are bound to be many differing viewpoints. Expressing these opinions enhances the learning experience and creates an atmosphere where students and instructors feel free to think and evaluate new ideas. On sensitive and volatile topics, students may sometimes disagree not only with each other but also with the instructor. Faculty and students are expected to respect other’s views as expressed in classroom discussions.

Student Discipline: You are expected to adhere to the rules for classroom use, including the injunction against food or drink. You may be asked to leave the classroom by the instructor if your conduct is contrary to prescribed practice. Policies are spelled out in depth at http://www.austincc.edu/handbook/policies7.htm

Services for Students with Disabilities: www.austincc.edu/osd

The Office for Students with Disabilities (OSD) assists students with documented disabilities to access reasonable accommodations. To request ACC accommodations, students must submit appropriate diagnostic documentation to the OSD supervisor at their primary campus. Students attending multiple campuses must meet with the OSD supervisor at each campus where accommodations are needed. Accommodations must be requested before each semester they are needed. NOTE: Students are urged to apply for accommodations at least three weeks before the start of each term.” (On-line Student Handbook, http://www.austincc.edu/handbook/resource7.htm#services

The EVC Learning Lab is located on the 3rd floor of building 2000, above the library. It offers: tutoring assistance, grammar and punctuation exercises, test taking skills, note taking skills, study skills, and time management skills as well as open computer labs with internet access.

 

Scholastic Dishonesty:

1. “Acts prohibited by the college for which discipline may be administered include scholastic dishonesty, including but not limited to cheating on an exam or quiz, plagiarizing, and unauthorized collaboration with another in preparing outside work. Academic work submitted by students shall be the result of their thought, research or self-expression. Academic work is defined as, but not limited to tests, quizzes, whether taken electronically or on paper; projects, either individual or group; classroom presentations, and homework.”

2. “When students borrow ideas, wording or organization from another source, they shall reference that information in an appropriate manner.” (Student Handbook 2005-2006, http://www.austincc.edu/handbook/policies4.htm).

 

Plagiarism and is taken very seriously. See Appendix 1, Plagiarism. Understanding plagiarism is for your protection. You MUST follow the ACC library’s guidelines found at http://library.austincc.edu/help/documen/and http://library.austincc.edu/help/MLA/

On-line Student Handbook 2006-2007, http://www.austincc.edu/handbook/policies7.htm.

 

If I suspect dishonest academic behavior, such as plagiarism, I will bring it to the student’s attention first. I will refer uncorrected or extremely dishonest behavior to the department chair for disciplinary action. See: http://www.austincc.edu/handbook/policies7.htm

Plagiarism is presenting the words or ideas of someone else as your own without proper acknowledgment of the source. If you don't credit the author, you are committing a type of theft called plagiarism. When you work on a research paper you will probably find supporting material for your paper from works by others. It's okay to use the ideas of other people, but you do need to correctly credit them. When you quote people -- or even when you summarize or paraphrase information found in books, articles, or Web pages -- you must acknowledge the original author, even when you buy or use a term paper written by someone else and try to pass it off as yours. Quoted from:

http://www.wmich.edu/library/searchpath/module6/04-plagiarism.html

Readings

Course Schedule Summer 2012

DRAM 2366 Film Appreciation, Synonym 05012

EVC 9225

TTh 2:15 to 5:20 pm, May 29 to August 15

Instructor: Richard Cutler, Ph.D.

Course Calendar

Text: Chapter study References are to Barsam & Monahan, Looking At Movies (LAM)

 

DAY/DATE

DUE

Class Work

Homework for next class.

1

Tue/May 29

·         Class Introductions (:60)

·         Syllabus & Assignments. Journal (:30)

·         View LAM Tutorials, Ch. 1 “Looking At Movies” about Story & Film Analysis  discussion (:30)

·         Define Analytical Essays & discuss Critical Thinking Skills (:60)

Preview homework & next class

Until you get the book, be ready to present the following:http://faculty.washington.edu/mlg/courses/definitions/classicalHollywoodcinema.html

You Tube: Formal Analysis & Shots & Angleshttp://www.aber.ac.uk/media/Documents/short/gramtv.html

 

2

Thur/May 31

Have book

Objectives:

1) Remember sequence of scenes/shots, i.e., the story. Pass out work sheet with instructions and example of sequence outline from Swain.

Themes. Definition, LAM, 15 & 81.

Complete sequence outline of Bicycle Thief

2) Distinguish themes from story. 3) Practice critical thinking: thesis, assertion, testing (finding objective support), and conclusion based upon the process.

 

Study “Looking at Movies” (LAM) Ch.1 pp. 2-25 & answer questions 2-4 & 6 on p. 24.Type the questions and give complete sentences for answers. Explain in your own words, supplemented with quotes from the reading. Use MLA-style citation to support your interpretations.

3 & 3 exercise. Extend what you learned in class about themes and support for them to produce a total of three themes from the complete story, each with three quotes or thumbnail facts for support.

Journal: “How I did today and what I will do to ‘level-up.’”

3

Tue/June 5

 

Ch.1 Q&A

3 & 3

Discuss Ch.1 Q & A.

View ½  Bicycle Thief

Write 4 sentences based upon the film: one on themes and three on supporting points. (:60)

Discuss themes and support.

Review paper process. See Paper Topics and Guidelines.

 

Discuss where to find Bicycle Thief.

Study Chapter 2 in LAM. Type Q & As 2, 3, 5, 6, & 7 (p. 57).  Explain in your own words, supplemented by quotes from the LAM reading to support your interpretations. Include proper in-text and Works Cited according to MLA style.

 

View Bicycle Thief again noting themes and possible thesis. Start paper by working on support for themes. Trust that thesis will emerge in the process.

 

Paper length: 1-2 pp., double-spaced, 12 point type, 1.25” margins. Create header with name, assignment, and date. Insert page number wherever you like: top, corner, bottom, or side. For authoritative quotes on Bicycle Thief, see   http://www.mrqe.com/

http://www.imdb.com/

4

Thur/Jun 7

 

Ch.2 Q & A

View 2ndBicycle Thief.  Practice distinguishing Story & Plot

DVD tutorial on Form & Content. Discuss Ch. 2 study questions.

Note for your journal what you learned from seeing the tutorial after having already prepared answers to the book’s questions.

Screen film TBA & write sequence outline.

Complete 1st Paper. Save paper as 1stInitialLastName.Word 1997-2003 or .rtf. Email digital copy to rcutler@austincc.edu

5

Tue/Jun 12   Due.Bicycle Thief

Paper & digital copy

View sequences from The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari. DiscussExpressionism. View portions of Noir-ish films: Maltese Falcon, M, Metropolis, Double Indemnity,& Blade Runner

 

Study LAM Ch. 3, Genre and answer Q & As. 1, 2, 5, 7, 8, & 10.

Journal: “What did I learn from the tutorial AFTER I answered the study questions? What 3 things have I learned about genre analysis? How do I measure progress?”

6

Thur/Jun 14

Ch.3 Q & A

Discuss Ch. 3, Q & As

View portions of Blade Runner

View Westerns: Stagecoach & The Searchers

Study Ch. 4, Elements of Narrative. Answer questions 2, 3, & 7-10 on pp. 151 & 152.

 

StudyLAM Ch.7 and answer questions 1, 5-8, & 10 on pp. 317 & 318.

7

Tue/Jun 19

Ch’s 4 & 7 Q & A

Discuss Q & As for Ch’s 4 & 7

View Seven Samurai and/or Blade Runner

Begin Paper 2, on either Blade Runner or  Seven Samurai. DUE Jun 26th.

8

Thur/Jun 21

Continue viewing  Seven Samurai or  Blade Runner

Write Paper 2 over weekend.

9

Tue/Jun 26  Paper #2

Objectives: Introduction to the elements of cinematography and their affective impact. Name the main types of shots, angles, camera movements, etc.

 

Study Ch. 6, Cinematography. Answer questions 4-9 on p. 267

10

Thur/Jun 28

Ch.6 Q & A

Discuss Ch. 6 Q & As. Practice identifying cinematography terms from Ch. 6.

 

Study Ch. 5, Mise-en-scene. Answer questions 2 & 5-9 on page 205.

Journal: “Do I believe all of these elements of mise-en-scene and cinematography have deeper meaning that what they portray?”

11

Tue/Jul 3

Ch.5 Q & A

Review elements of Mise-en-scene as found in Seven Samurai and Blade Runner.

Begin Paper 3.  Chose fromSeven Samurai and Blade Runner.

12

Thur/Jul 5

Practice identifying elements of mise-en-scene in filmmaking.

Complete Paper #3, including mise-en-scene

13

Tue/Jul 10

Paper #3

Overview of Subjective Experience, Realist to Formalist dimension. View Andalusian Dog. View portions ofBattleshipPotemkin

 

Study Ch. 8, Editing,and answer questions 3, 4, & 6-8 on p.365.

Study Ch. 9, Sound, and answer questions 3, 4, 6 & 10.

14

Thur/Jul 12

Ch’s 8 & 9 Q & As

View Run Lola, Run Discuss Ch’s 8 & 9 Q & As

Review Ch’s. on Acting, Characterization, Start on Paper #4 on  Run Lola, Run paying attention to camera movement, editing, and sound and their subjective viewer effects.

15

Tue/Jul 17

Continue viewing and discussing  Run Lola, Run

Complete  Run Lola, Run paper

16

Thur/Jul 19

Paper #4,Run Lola, Run

View Blow-Up. Discuss Antonioni’s story-telling

Study LAM Ch’s 4 & 5 again examining the role of narrator, story, and filmic space.

17

Tue/Jul 24

View Blow-Up. Discuss Antonioni’s story-telling

Search for and cite other sources on Antonioni and Blow-Up. Begin writing on what the final sequence means to you.

18

Thur/Jul 26

Discuss notes on Blow-Up.

Write Paper # 5 on Blow-Up in its entirety.

19

Tue/Jul31

Paper #5,

Blow-Up

Introduction to Citizen Kane

Study handouts on “Kane.” Begin forming ideas about what it’s about.

20

Thur/Aug 2

View and discuss parts of Kane

Begin organizing Paper #6 as a Synthesis of all we’ve studied.

21

Tue/Aug 7

View and discuss more of Kane

Write.

22

Thur/Aug 9

Review elements to write about.

Complete Paper #6 on Citizen Kane.

23

Tue/Aug 14

Paper # 6,

Citizen Kane

Last Class. Review papers and grades

 

Rev. 05132012 Subject to change.

Course Subjects

DAY/DATE

Class Work

Homework for next class.

WedJan 19

Introductions.  Discuss on-line sources. View short film. Write Essay.

Study Giannetti for Photography, including shots, angles, Mise-en-scene, including color and light, and (camera) Movement. Study Assignments – “Elements of Classic Hollywood Cinema on Blackboard for Themes and same topics as in Giannetti Ch’.s 1-3.

Mon/Jan 24

Review themes, shots, angles, mise-en-scene. View “Blade Runner.”

Begin Paper 1:“Blade Runner.” Due Jan 31, online & at the start of class. Use “Basic Guidelines for analytic papers” in Blackboard, under Course Materials. See “Film Grammar” Power Point in Course Materials.

Wed/Jan 26

Review Color & Light (key & contrast) & Camera Movement. View Melies’ “Voyage to the Moon”

Write 1st paper. Refer to Giannetti, Ch’s. 1 – 3, Melies’ “Voyage to the Moon,” and Related topics on Blackboard. (Don’t be afraid to figure out which are the related topics.)

Mon/Jan 31

DUE, 1st paper: “Blade Runner.” Group review.

Study for exam, Giannetti, Ch’s. 1-3, lecture notes, Melies’ film, & relevant Blackboard readings.

Wed/Feb 2

Exam 1.

 Begin Paper 2. To the CHC elements studied previously, add Editing & Montage to your analysis. DUE Feb. 14.

Mon/Feb 7

Review Exam. View ”Battleship Potemkin.”  Discuss editing & montage.

 

Wed/Feb 9

View ”Battleship Potemkin.”  

Paper DUE Feb. 14 online & copy at start of class.

Mon/Feb 14

2nd paper DUE. Group review for exam.

Study Giannetti on Editing & montage lecture, “Battleship Potemkin,” and Blackboard readings.

Wed/Feb 16

Exam 2

Study Sound, Acting, Drama, & Story (see Power Point on Setting & Decor.)

Mon/Feb 21

Review exam 2. Discuss Acting, Drama, & Story. View and discuss “Andalusian Dog”

Begin Paper 3. Due March 7. Study Story & Writing.

Wed/Feb 23

 View “Run Lola, Run”

Write paper on “Run Lola, Run”

Mon/Feb 28

. View “Run Lola, Run”

Study Giannetti: Sound, Acting, Drama, & Story, lecture notes, “Andalusian Dog,” and Setting & Décor Power Point.

Wed/Mar 2

View “Run Lola, Run”

Review Sound, Drama, Story, & Color plus readings in Blackboard:

Mon/Mar 7

3rd paper DUE Review for Exam 3.

Study “Critical Storytelling” and “PsychoSocial” on Blackboard.

Wed/Mar 9

Exam 3.

Study Giannetti chapter on”Writing” and Blackboard on Expressionism.

Mar 14-20

SPRING BREAK.

 

Mon/Mar 21

View “The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari.” Review Story & Critical Storytelling, Psychosocial. Group review

Start Paper 4, “Blue Velvet.” DUE April 4th.

Wed/Mar 23

Review for Exam 4.

Study all CHC to date, including “Andalusian Dog,” and “Blue Velvet.” Put emphasis on Critical Storytelling, Psychosocial, and Color for exam 4.

Mon/Mar 28

Exam 4.

Study Story & Writing.

Wed/Mar 30

Review exam 4. Discuss Film Noir. View “Maltese Falcon.”

Complete paper 4 on “Blue Velvet.”

Mon/Apr 4

Paper 4 DUE. View “Maltese Falcon.”

Study Story & Writing, Expressionism & Film Noir, and “The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari.”

Wed/Apr 6

Review for Exam 5

Study for Exam 5: Story & Writing, Expressionism & Film Noir, and “The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari.

Mon/Apr 11

Exam 5.

.”Study Giannetti, Ch.10, “Ideology, Blackboard “Ideology,” The Writer’s Journey, and Myth & the Movies: Archetypes and The Mythic Journey Story Arc,” on Reserve at the EVC Library Circulation Desk. For more information than you ever wanted to know on archetypes see Google, “Archetypes in Movies” and Wikipedia, “Jungian Archetypes in Films” or some variation of these terms.

Wed/Apr 13

View & Discuss "A Clockwork Orange"

ditto

Mon/Apr 18

View & Discuss "A Clockwork Orange"

 

Wed/Apr 20

Group review for exam 6.

Study for exam 6 -- “Ideology,” “The Mythic Journey Story Arc,” including Archetypes.

Mon/Apr 25

Exam 6

Begin paper 7 on Synthesis & “Citizen Kane.” DUE Monday, May 9th, beginning of class. Study Ch’s. 11 & 12, “Critique,” & “Synthesis.” and Blackboard, “Ideology & Synthesis.”

Wed/Apr 27

Review Exam 6. View “Citizen Kane”

Write “Citizen Kane” paper

Mon/May 2

Discuss alternative perspectives of “Citizen Kane”

.Re-Write “Citizen Kane” paper

Wed/May 4

Discuss “Synthesis.” 

View “Citizen Kane”

Finish “Citizen Kane” paper.

Mon/May 9

Paper 5 DUE on “Kane.  Review 4 Exam 7

Study for exam 7.

Wed/May 11

Exam 7.

Have a great summer!

Student Learning Outcomes/Learning Objectives

 

Objectives:

  • View and deconstruct films primarily from the perspective of Classical Hollywod Cinema (CHC).

  • Collaboratively develop points of view from discussion.

  • Contribute to classroom discussion with oral analyses.

  • Study film sequences cut-by-cut and scene-by-scene.

  • Learn the basics of film criticism from authorities.

  • Apply learning via regular written assignments.

Policies

Policies      Please READ THIS!!!

Preparation, Absence, Participation and Withdrawal
 
Absence: Attendance is NOT taken each class. If you miss class, check Blackboard for Announcements, Class Materials, and Schedule of Assignments. Learn what you missed before the next class and before contacting me. While I AM ALWAYS AVAILABLE TO ANSWER QUESTIONS about the assignments, please DO NOT expect me to regurgitate 2 hours & 15 minutes worth of class. Save “Did I miss anything important?” for a classmate. It’s insulting. If the lecture is not posted to Blackboard; if the class covered content that differs from the reading, or if the lecture material was not covered in the assigned readings – as it often is not, ask a classmate to share notes. If you missed a film, it’s your responsibility to find it and view it before the next class. 
If you need to leave before instruction is over, common courtesy is to advise me BEFORE instruction begins; otherwise your sudden departure will disrupt the class. I will take it personally. You will need to complete a waiver and supply emergency contact information before required field trips such as a film screening.

 

Withdrawal: If you cannot keep up with the schedule, you should consider withdrawing before the deadline in order to avoid a low grade.Do not simply quit coming to class. That lack of action affects your grade point. Withdrawal for whatever reason is your responsibility.  Further, lack of attendance or work may result in your involuntary withdrawal from the class for the following:

1.       miss more than one paper due date; miss more than one exam; or miss one paper and an exam;

2.     you are not completely caught up with missed work (even if excused) by the withdrawal deadline. The ACC home page has a link to the Academic Calendar.

3.     See STUDENT HANDBOOK: http://www.austincc.edu/handbook/acaguid7.htm#withdraw

4.     Familiarize yourself with college rules and policies that may affect you.

 

Scholastic Dishonesty:

1. “Acts prohibited by the college for which discipline may be administered include scholastic dishonesty, including but not limited to cheating on an exam or quiz, plagiarizing, and unauthorized collaboration with another in preparing outside work. Academic work submitted by students shall be the result of their thought, research or self-expression. Academic work is defined as, but not limited to tests, quizzes, whether taken electronically or on paper; projects, either individual or group; classroom presentations, and homework.”

 

2. “When students borrow ideas, wording or organization from another source, they shall reference that information in an appropriate manner.” (Student Handbook 2005-2006, http://www.austincc.edu/handbook/policies4.htm).

 

Failure to credit sources that inform your work is plagiarism and is not tolerated -- at all. If I suspect dishonest academic behavior, such as plagiarism*, I will bring it to the student’s attention first. I will refer uncorrected or extremely dishonest behavior to the department chair for disciplinary action. See: http://www.austincc.edu/handbook/policies7.htm. See, also, Appendix 1, Plagiarism. Understanding plagiarism is for your protection. You MUST follow the ACC library’s guidelines found at http://library.austincc.edu/help/documen/ and http://library.austincc.edu/help/MLA/

 

On-line Student Handbook 2006-2007, http://www.austincc.edu/handbook/policies7.htm

Academic Freedom:  In any classroom situation that includes discussion and critical thinking, there are bound to be many differing viewpoints. Expressing these opinions enhances the learning experience and creates an atmosphere where students and instructors feel free to think and evaluate new ideas. On sensitive and volatile topics, students may sometimes disagree not only with each other but also with the instructor. Faculty and students are expected to respect other’s views as expressed in classroom discussions.

Student Discipline:  You are expected to adhere to the rules for classroom use, including the injunction against food or drink. You may be asked to leave the classroom by the instructor if your conduct is contrary to prescribed practice. Policies are spelled out in depth at http://www.austincc.edu/handbook/policies7.htm

Services for Students with Disabilities: www.austincc.edu/osd The Office for Students with Disabilities (OSD) assists students with documented disabilities to access reasonable accommodations. To request ACC accommodations, students must submit appropriate diagnostic documentation to the OSD supervisor at their primary campus. Students attending multiple campuses must meet with the OSD supervisor at each campus where accommodations are needed. Accommodations must be requested before each semester they are needed. NOTE: Students are urged to apply for accommodations at least three weeks before the start of each term.” (On-line Student Handbook, http://www.austincc.edu/handbook/resource7.htm#services

The EVCLearning Lab is located on the 3rd floor of building 2000, above the library, and it offers: tutoring assistance, grammar and punctuation exercises, test taking skills, note taking skills, study skills, and time management skills as well as open computer labs with internet access.

 

APPENDIX 1

 

 

*Plagiarism

Plagiarism is presenting the words or ideas of someone else as your own without proper acknowledgment of the source. If you don't credit the author, you are committing a type of theft called plagiarism. When you work on a research paper you will probably find supporting material for your paper from works by others. It's okay to use the ideas of other people, but you do need to correctly credit them. When you quote people -- or even when you summarize or paraphrase information found in books, articles, or Web pages -- you must acknowledge the original author.

DON’T

1.       Buy or use a term paper written by someone else.

2.     Cut and paste passages from the Web, a book, or an article and insert them into your paper without citing them. Warning!It is now easy to search and find passages that have been copied from the Web.

3.     Use the words or ideas of another person without citing them.

4.     Paraphrase that person's words without citing them.

Quoted from:

http://www.wmich.edu/library/searchpath/module6/04-plagiarism.html

Addendum

 

*Plagiarism

Plagiarism is presenting the words or ideas of someone else as your own without proper acknowledgment of the source. If you don't credit the author, you are committing a type of theft called plagiarism. When you work on a research paper you will probably find supporting material for your paper from works by others. It's okay to use the ideas of other people, but you do need to correctly credit them. When you quote people -- or even when you summarize or paraphrase information found in books, articles, or Web pages -- you must acknowledge the original author.

DON’T

1.       Buy or use a term paper written by someone else.

2.     Cut and paste passages from the Web, a book, or an article and insert them into your paper without citing them. Warning!It is now easy to search and find passages that have been copied from the Web.

3.     Use the words or ideas of another person without citing them.

4.     Paraphrase that person's words without citing them.

Quoted from:

http://www.wmich.edu/library/searchpath/module6/04-plagiarism.html