Syllabus
Basic Animation

Basic Animation

ARTV-1403

Fall 2011
08/22/2011 - 12/11/2011

Course Information

Section 004
Lecture
MW 9:00AM - 11:40AM
SAC1 1211
Brian McLean
bmclean@austincc.edu
(512) 223.3111

Office Hours

  • T Th
    11:40 am - 12:10pm
    NRG Viscom office 3000 bldg

Course Requirements

 

Prerequisite: ARTC-1409 (ARTC-1309) Basic Illustration

 

Prerequisites & Preferred Foundation

ARTC 1309, CAT 2033, ARTC 1409 or Program Coordinator approval.  This course relies heavily on drawing and students will need basic drawing skills to do well, like basic perspective drawing and human figure drawing.  If you feel that your drawing skills are inadequate consult with the instructor about your concerns. 

 

Course Description

Examination of concepts, characters, and storyboards for basic animation production. Emphasis on creating movement and expression utilizing traditional or electronically generated image sequences. An introduction to traditional animation; course includes design, storyboarding, stop-motion and character animation. Gives students a working knowledge of animation techniques necessary to design animated sequences. Laboratory fee.

 

Supplies

►  These are the supplies that you may utilize for the class:

1-2 Reams of bond (copier) paper, 8 1/2 x 11, 20 lb., white (for animation drawings)

Pencils ( regular  # 2, non mechanical preferred)

small pencil sharpener

Eraser (kneaded, white “Magic Rub”, whatever you prefer is fine)

Straight edge ruler

Large envelopes or expandable folders (to hold animation drawings; there will be a lot)

Registration system for drawing animation: Classroom has animation discs with  pegbar (ACME pegs).  If you need to work at home:

Northridge Bookstore may stock ACME Standard Registration inking pegbars.

Asel Art Supply on MLK may be selling inking boards that they’ve ordered from “Cartoon Colour” for about $20.  The boards come with an ACME Standard Registration pegbar set into them.  They sometimes also sell the pegbars separately which you can tape down to any surface.  You can also order these things directly from Cartoon Colour.

►  Later in the class you’ll need:

Small handheld mirror (for Cartoon Take exercise)

Jump drive (Flash media)  for saving exercises digitally

 

Asel Art Supply, Inc. 510 W Martin Luther King Jr BlvdAustin, TX 78701(512) 477-1762

Cartoon Colour Company, Inc.  9024 Lindblade Street Culver City, California 90232-2584  Phone: (800) 523-3665 Fax: (310) 838-8467 http://cartooncolour.com/

Required Texts

This course covers a lot of information in a short time.  To cover each topic thoroughly, students are required to read the assigned text before the corresponding lecture.  These books support the material covered during lectures and should be brought to class to be used as reference.

 

"The Animator's Survival Kit" Expanded Edition by Richard Williams

   ISBN: 0571238343

   Publisher: Faber & Faber, Inc.

 

Due to a limited shelf space, the ACC Bookstore on campus only stocks a limited supply of required texts.  This is because many students prefer to find the books elsewhere at a discounted price.  If you order the required texts online, make sure you ask for a 1-2 day shipping delivery.

 

Recommended Texts

The following are some books about drawing, animation, and filmmaking you may want to consider adding to your personal library.

 

Cartoon Animationby Preston Blair       Chuck Reducks by Chuck Jones

Disney’s Illusion of Life by Frank Thomas and Ollie Johnston 

 

Instructional Methodology

This course is a Lecture-Lab course in Basic Animation.  During each class, the instructor will present new information (lecture) and supervise assigned work to help students develop their animation skills (lab).  Solutions to individual student problems are demonstrated for the entire class.  The instructor’s ability to evaluate students’ progress is founded on observing their productivity in class as well as the quality of their work.

Therefore, if you want a good evaluation from the instructor it is recommended that you work in the classroom and do the best job you can in your artwork.

 

Course Rationale

This course is aimed at the multi-media certificate student or the Visual Communication Design major who is interested in pursuing a career in 2-D or 3-D animation.  Its purpose is to familiarize students with animation theory, production, and the basic motion principles.  It is a prerequisite to both ARTV 2401 2D Animation I and ARTV 1491 Special Topics-Advanced Animation, and a recommended course for ARTV 1451 Digital Video.

 

Student Outcomes and Objectives

The student will demonstrate character design & development skills; communicate conceptual ideas through storyboards; produce hand drawn, two-dimensional (2-D) animation sequences using traditional tools; demonstrate a solid understanding of basic motion study principles.

 

Evaluation & Grading

This course introduces the student to motion study basics through a series of pencil test exercises, each with assigned objectives and criteria.  All exercises are graded using three scales (Aesthetics, Knowledge, & Ethics).  Each scale awards points based on the student’s effort to meet the exercise criteria (Superior - Unacceptable). 

 

Scales:

A)  Ethics- ability to follow directions, work hard in & out of class, make an effort to meet exercise objectives, and complete the work on time. Class participation and attendance.

 

 

B)  Knowledge - ability to understand, retain, and demonstrate the use of the Twelve Principles of Animation (Timing, Arcs, Slow-in & Slow-out, Solid Drawing, Straight-Ahead & Pose-to-Pose Action, Squash & Stretch, Anticipation, Exaggeration, Follow Through & Overlapping Action, Appeal, Secondary Action, & Staging).

 

C)  Aesthetics – Quality, aptitude, skill, and manual dexterity in use of media and tools (drawing supplies, registration system, page flipping and capture software).  Overall technique is the manner and skill in which the student uses the tools to achieve the chosen effect (volumetric drawing, consistency, timing, design, paths of motion and cycling).

 

 

Students will be given 3 sets of grade averages during the semester.  These grades provide students with the opportunity to evaluate their standing in the class.  Students can contact the instructor during the office hours listed at the beginning of this document if they need to discuss their progress, or to seek additional help. 

 

Exercises

 

1.  Morph

2.  Ball Bounce

3.  Walk Cycles

(Grade 1)

 

4. Wave/Whip

5.  Head Turn and Secondary Action

6.  Lift

(Grade 2)

 

7.  Take

8.  Flour Sack Jump

(Grade 3)

 

 

Passing Grade Policy:  Grade C or Better

Effective September 2005 the grade of “D” in any of the Visual Communication courses is no longer acceptable for credit hours on a student’s transcript.The student must make a “C” or better after September 2005 in order to receive credit and proceed to the next level course.Students already in our program who have a “D” on their transcript prior to September 2005 will be allowed to proceed to the next level course.

 

Attendance and Class Participation

Attendance is mandatory and recorded every class.  Students only have a limited number of contact hours with the instructor.  This is roughly equivalent to two weeks on production in an industry studio.  In a semester with holidays, the number is less. 

 

Though students may find they want to continue to work on their exercises outside of class, they need to continue to be productive during class.  The instructor’s ability to evaluate a student’s progress or offer feedback on a student’s production skills is founded on observing the student’s productivity in class.  This cannot happen if the work was produced entirely outside of class and will result in the loss of points. 

 

To emphasize the importance of class participation, students will lose points for absences and low productivity during class.  Failure to show up for class and work on your projects during class time will automatically lower your grade.  Students need to let the instructor know when they cannot make it to class PRIOR TO THE CLASS.  The instructor can drop a student after 3 absences.  The instructor will set a grace period of 10 minutes at the beginning of each class before a student will be deemed tardy.  After the grace period if a student arrives late to class they will be counted as tardy.  Three tardies count for one absence ; if a total of 9 tardies occur, the instructor may drop the student from the class.  If a student is not committed to meeting the required class time, they should drop the class and register during a semester when they can meet these requirements. 

 

An Animation Studio works much like an assembly line.  If an employee is late or absent then the whole studio falls behind in terms of workflow.  Everything in the Animation industry is based on how fast an animator can get done with their work.  

 

Withdrawal

Students are responsible for withdrawing themselves if they quit coming to class.  If a student simply stops coming to class, a failing grade will appear on his/ her transcript.  Please contact the instructor if you know you must miss a class ahead of time. The final withdrawal date for Fall 2011 is Thursday, November 17, 2011.

 

Note: Dropping or withdrawing from a course may affect financial aid, veterans’ benefits, international student status, oracademic standing. Students are urged to consult with their instructor, advisor, or a counselor before making schedule changes.

 

Incomplete

Meeting deadlines is one of the most important aspects of Animation production.  Therefore, all work must be completed within the class deadlines.  If there is a lack of work, the student will be graded on the work that the instructor has received -- the instructor will not give incomplete grades.  The skills taught in this class act as a foundation for subsequent classes.  If a student knows he or she will not be able to complete the class, they should drop the class and register again during a time when they know they can complete the full course.

 

Academic Dishonesty

Students have the responsibility to submit coursework that is the result of their own thought, research, or self expression.

 

The following are guidelines to assist students in avoiding academic dishonesty:

  • Students must do their own work and submit only their own work on examinations, reports, and projects, unless otherwise permitted by the instructor. Students are encouraged to contact their instructor about appropriate citation guidelines.
  • Students must follow all instructions given by instructors or designated college representatives when taking examinations, placement assessments, tests, quizzes, and evaluations.

 

Actions constituting violations of academic dishonesty include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • Plagiarism
  • Cheating
  • Fabrication
  • Collusion
  • Falsifying institutional records or other legal or source documents: Includes altering grades, either written or electronic, or other falsification of academic records such as application for admission, grade reports, test papers, registration materials, and reporting forms used by the college. (Student Handbook 2010-2011, pg. 34)

 

Students found in violation of this policy will be dropped from the class and a failing grade will appear on his/ her transcript.

 

Academic Freedom

Each student is strongly encouraged to participate in class.  In any classroom situation that includes discussion and critical thinking, there are bound to be many different viewpoints.  These differences enhance the learning experience and create an atmosphere where students and instructors alike will be encouraged to think and learn.  On sensitive and volatile topics, students may sometimes disagree not only with each other but also with the instructor.  It is expected that faculty and students will respect the views of others when expressed in classroom discussions.

 

Student Discipline

Everyone is expected and required to act in a scholarly, courteous, and appropriate manner during class.  Inappropriate actions, behaviors, or remarks will not be tolerated and are grounds for removal from the class.  Food and drink may be brought into the class but are never to be consumed near the computers.  The instructor WILL make the student leave the classroom if food or drink is placed near the computers.  Headphones/earbuds are required if you intend to work to music.

 

By enrolling at ACC, students agree to abide by the college’s Student Standards of Conduct. These standards also establish disciplinary procedures for students accused of violating those standards. The Student Standards of Conduct and the Disciplinary Process are published in the Student Handbook on page 33 and online at ACC's Administrative Rules section.

 

Copyright

The software programs in the labs are licensed to the college as the original purchaser and as such are not available for students to duplicate for their personal use. Do not use college equipment to duplicate software for other students or to produce work-for-profit. Do not copy or scan copyrighted material for use in your projects.

 

Students with Disabilities

Support services for students with documented disabilities are offered   at each campus through the Office for Students with Disabilities  (OSD). Each semester students must request accommodations with the OSD  Coordinator or Specialist at the campus they expect to schedule most of their classes. Appropriate accommodations are determined on a case- by-case basis by the student’s documented disability and by the course content and delivery method of each course for which the student has registered. Examples of common accommodations include, but are not  
limited to, registration assistance, testing accommodations, sign language interpreters, and note takers. For accommodations to be in place by the first day of each semester, students must request  
accommodations at least 4 weeks before the semester begins. ACC partners with the Texas Department of Assistive and Rehabilitative Services (DARS) and other community service organizations to provide support services for students with disabilities. All requestsfor accommodations must be presented to the instructor during the first week of class.
(Student Handbook 2010-2011, pg. 23)

 

Six-Withdrawals Limit

State law permits students to withdraw from no more than six courses during their entire undergraduate career at Texas public colleges or universities. All course withdrawals automatically count toward the limit unless:

• The student withdraws from all courses;

• The student or course is exempt from the rule; or

• The student receives an exception authorized by college officials.

Students who reach their withdrawal limit must remain on the class roll unless they request and receive approval for a withdrawal exception. Exceptions are listed on page 25 of the 2010-2011 Student Handbook.

 

(Students who officially exit a course during either the schedule change period or before the official college reporting date are considered to have “dropped” the course. They do so by submitting the official request to Admissions and Records. “Dropped” courses are not

considered withdrawals and are not posted on the student transcript.)

 

Cell Phone Policy

Students should turn their cell phone off or set it to vibrate during scheduled class times. Students

may check messages during their break as long as their phone calls don’t cause the student to return late from break. During an emergency situation, the student should notify the instructor. Instructors will use their discretion to determine an emergency situation. Department of Visual Communication Policy & Procedure Manual.

 

Privacy Policy

The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act protects confidentiality of your educational records. Grades cannot be given over the phone, posted, over e-mail, or through a fellow student.

Other Helpful Websites

http://www.austincc.edu/handbook/handbk11.pdf  (Student Handbook)

http://www.austincc.edu/support/index.php  (Student Services)

http://www.viscom.austincc.edu/ (Visual Communication Design website)

Readings

 Class Schedule

*****   Projects and reading assignments  may be subject to change by Instructor. If there is a change in the schedule, the Instructor will notify students ahead of time. Text: "The Animator's Survival Kit" Expanded Edition by Richard Williams.

  • Week 1 and 2:

 

  • Introduction to course
  • Review Instructor contact information; equipment; Syllabus; Resources for supplies; Camera system; Texts; Etc.
  • Lecture: Timing, animation charts, Solid Drawing, Slow-In & Slow-Out
  • Assignment: “Morph
  • Animate one shape morphing into another.
  • Read pages 46-69 in the Animator’s Survival Kit by Richard Williams

 

  • Week 3:

 

  • Lecture: Pose-to-PoseAction and Squash & Stretch
  • Assignment: “Ball Bounce
  • Animate a sphere bouncing across the “view-plane”.
  • In-class work on “Ball Bounce”
  • Assigned Readings:
  • Williams: Walks (pgs 102-175)

 

  • Week 4:

 

  • Lecture: Tilt & Balance and Cycling
  • Discuss the importance of maintaining a character’s balance through the use of tilt.  Discuss and show how to use cycles to save time on creating new drawings and displace them across the page. 
  • Assignment: “Walk Cycles
  • Animate a character walking across the camera’s view.

 

  • Week 5:

 

  • In-class work on “Walk”
  •     Assigned Readings:
  • Williams: Timing, Staggers, Wave & Whip (pgs 297-303)
  • Williams: Breaking Joints (pg 342)

                       

Grade 1

 

  • Week 6:
  • Lecture: Secondary Action
  • Discuss waveforms, flapping surfaces and arcs of action .
  • Assignment: “Wave/Whip
  • Animate a flag flap and throwing arm wave.

 

 

 

 

  • Week 7:

 

  • Finish In-class work on “Wave/Whip”
  •     Assigned Readings:
  • Williams: Flexibility (pgs  217-255)
  • Williams: Holds (pg 368)

 

  • Week 8:

 

  • Lecture: Follow-Through and Overlapping Action
  • Discuss the importance of parent/child linkage and “settle”.
  • Assignment: “Head Turn and Secondary Action
  • Animate a bald head turning in perspective.  Re-trace and add hair to the

head turn.

 

  • Week9:

 

  • Finish In-class work on “Head Turn and Secondary Action”
  • Assigned Readings:
  • Williams: Weight (pgs 256-272)
  • Williams: Realism (pgs 361-365)

 

  • Week 10:

 

  •    Lecture: Weight & Resistance
  • Discuss the importance of resistance to establish a sense of weight.
  • Assignment: “Lift
  • Storyboard and animate a “lift a heavy object” sequence.
  • In-class work on “Lift”

      

  • Week 11:

 

  •    In-class work on “Lift”
  • Assigned Readings:
  • Williams: Takes & Accents (pgs 285-296)
  • Williams: Acting (pgs 315-326)

 

Grade 2

      

 

  • Week 12:

 

  • Lecture: Changing Body Attitude
  • Discuss the importance of body language in communicating emotion.
  • Assignment: “Take”
  • Storyboard and animate a sequence that shows a change in their character’s emotional state using body language.
  • In-class work on “Take”

 

  • Week 13:

 

  •    In-class work on “Take”
  • Assigned Readings:
  • Williams: Runs & Jumps & Skips (pgs 176-216)
  • Williams: Anticipation (pgs 273-284)

 

.

  • Week 14:

 

  •      Lecture: Anticipationand Follow Through & Overlapping
  • Assignment: “Flour Sack Jump
  • Animate a ½ filled flour sack jumping.  Focus on weight, balance and timing.

Thanksgiving Break Nov. 24th to Nov.27th  2011

  • Week 15:

 

  • Continue In-Class work on “Flour Sack Jump”

      

  • Week 16

 

  • In-class work on “Flour Sack Jump” and polish any previous projects

 

Grade 3

 

Recommended Texts

The following are some books about drawing, animation, and filmmaking you may want to consider adding to your personal library.

Cartoon Animationby Preston Blair       Chuck Reducks by Chuck Jones

Disney’s Illusion of Life by Frank Thomas and Ollie Johnston 

  

  • LAST DAY OF CLASS!  Happy Holidays!

Course Subjects

This course is aimed at the multi-media certificate student or the Visual Communication Design major who is interested in pursuing a career in 2-D or 3-D animation.  Its purpose is to familiarize students with animation theory, production, and the basic motion principles. 

We will examine concepts, characters, and storyboards for basic animation production. The emphasis will be on creating movement and expression utilizing traditional or electronically generated image sequences. This is an introduction to traditional animation; course includes design, storyboarding, stop-motion and character animation, to give students a working knowledge of animation techniques necessary to design animated sequences.

Student Learning Outcomes/Learning Objectives

Student Outcomes and Objectives

The student will demonstrate character design & development skills; communicate conceptual ideas through storyboards; produce hand drawn, two-dimensional (2-D) animation sequences using traditional tools; demonstrate a solid understanding of basic motion study principles.

The student will understand, retain, and demonstrate the use of the Twelve Principles of Animation (Timing, Arcs, Slow-in & Slow-out, Solid Drawing, Straight-Ahead & Pose-to-Pose Action, Squash & Stretch, Anticipation, Exaggeration, Follow Through & Overlapping Action, Appeal, Secondary Action, & Staging).