Syllabus
General College Physics II

General College Physics II

PHYS-1402

Spring 2012
01/17/2012 - 05/13/2012

Course Information

Section 004
Lecture
MW 3:00PM - 4:20PM
RGC1 331
David Potter
dpotter@austincc.edu
(512) 223.3303

Section 004
Laboratory
MW 4:30PM - 5:50PM
RGC1 326
David Potter
dpotter@austincc.edu
(512) 223.3303

Office Hours

No office hours have been entered for this term.

Course Requirements

 

College Physics II Spring 2012
 
 
PHY 1402 Syn 47302 sect 004 
 
 
week chapter(section) event lab 
Jan 18 16 the oscilloscope 
Jan 23, 25 17 charged straws 
Jan 30, Feb 1 18 field lines 
Feb 6, 8 19 capacitance 
Feb 13, 15 20 more capacitance 
Feb 20, 22 review test resistance 
Feb 27, 29 21 currents 
Mar 5, 7 22 circuits 
Mar 12, 14 23 magnetic field 
Mar 19, 21 -spring break -
Mar 26, 28 24 magnetic field 
Apr 2, 4 25 inductance 
Apr 9, 11 review test ac circuits 
Apr 16, 18 26 refraction 
Apr 23, 25 27 Brewster’s angle 
Apr 30, May 2 28 diffraction 
May 7, 9 review final labs due May 2 
It is very important that you are registered for class 
at this time. This will be checked, and you risk losing 
time and money if matters are not as they should be. 
See me immediately if there is any doubt. 
Attendance is very important, and will be recorded for 
both class and labs. Being present for tests is manda-
tory. Test make-ups should be cleared before missing a 
test. Lab make-ups will be available on Fridays. 
Lecture Mon/ Wed, 3:00 pm - 4:20 pm Room 331 
Lab Mon/ Wed, 4:30 pm - 6:00 pm Room 326 
Office Mon/ Wed, 6:00 pm - 7:00 pm Room 325.1 
email: gink@austin.rr.com phone 223- 3303 
Tests 
Feb. 22 Chapters 16, 17, 18, 19 (100 pts) 
Apr. 11 Chapters 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25 (100 pts) 
May. 9 Chapters 26, 27, 28* this test is cumulative (150 pts) 
Ch Homework Ch Homework 
16 15, 31. 51 23 23, 32, 36, 46, 62 
17 11, 25, 41, 51, 60, 
66, 81 
24 5, 14, 30, 37, 46 
18 3, 15, 36, 39, 60, 83 25 18, 33, 50, 56 
19 9, 23, 25, 34, 47, 54 26 6, 13, 23, 28 
20 7, 23, 28, 33, 45 27 3, 7, 15, 31, 40 
21 6, 14, 19, 42, 56 28 2, 6, 13, 18, 51 
22 13, 14, 27, 34, 39,45, 61 
Your grade consists of a set of labs, homework and the three test grades. The first two tests will each count 100 points, 
and the final is 150 points; all the labs together are 150 points and the all collected homework is 100 points. Your points 
earned will be divided by 600 (the maximum number of points possible) to give a numerical grade. 
 
You need to be present for tests. Make-ups should be cleared before missing a test. The first two tests are worth 100 
points each. Your last test is cumulative and is worth 150 points. 
 
Your labs are handed within two weeks after assigned. Lab make-ups are available on Fridays. 
 
All homework assignments come from the exercises and problems section of each chapter. Your homework will be due on 
the Wednesday two weeks after the corresponding chapter is covered in class. You can ask at any time about a homework 
problem, but give it a try before asking. Remember, in doing homework, as with everywhere else, it’s important to 
explain as much as you can about what you are doing. Please don’t run different chapters together, keep them separate. 
 
My email address is <gink@austin.rr.com> You can often reach me at 478-8125. Office hours are one hour before class 
on Monday through Thursday. Check online for class syllabi, homework assignments, and other information. 
 
COLLEGE PHYSICS II PHYSICS 1402 section 004 
SYNONYM: 47302 4 credits instructor: David Potter Spring 2012 
 
 
COURSE DESCRIPTION: A study of force, electricity, magnatism, and modern physics. This is the second half of PHYS 1405/1407 
sequence. 
 
PREREQUISITES : College Algebra and Trig. 
TEXT : Gimbattista, et al., Physics, 2nd editionOTHER : calculator 
METHODOLOGY : Lecture/Lab 
 
LECTURE: Mon/ Wed, 3:00 pm - 4:20 pm in RGC 331 
OFFICE LOCATION: RGC 325.1 
 
LAB: Mon/ Wed, 4:30 pm - 6:40 pm in RGC 326 
PHONE NUMBER: 223- 3303 
E-MAIL ADDRESS: gink@austin.rr.com 
OFFICE HOURS: Mon/Wen, from 6:30 pm - 7:00 pm 
APPOINTMENT HOURS: call or e-mail 
 
This is an introduction to physiscs for students not majoring in science. It requires no mathematical background, and no sciencebeyond PHYS 1405 or its equivalent. 
 
OBJECTIVES: 
In the lecture, to get a slightly deeper acquaintance with some important ideas of physics, and to get some practice thinking as aphysicist does. 
 
In the lab, to see some physical ideas made real, and to get some exposure to laboratory equipment, as well as to get some exposure 
to technical writing and using graphs and charts. 
 
GRADING SYSTEM: points earned are divided by 600 to get a class gradeTests: 200 points (100 pts each)
Final Exam: 150 points In most classes, 89 up is an “A”, 80-88 is a “B”, 65-79 is a “C”
Laboratories: 150 points Small variations from this will be fitted to individual classes. 
Homework: 100 points 
 
COURSE POLICIES: 
You are encouraged to attend. Too many absences can get you dropped. Withdrawals are generally up to student. 
 
 
For incompletes, see incomplete rule in college catalog (This section in the catalog is 3 paragraphs long). 
 
 
Scholastic Dishonesty: Acts prohibited by the college for which discipline may be administered include scholastic dishonesty, including 
but not limited to cheating on an exam or quiz, plagiarizing, and unauthorized collaboration with another in preparing outside
work. Academic work submitted by students shall be the result of their thought, research or self-expression. Academic work is 
defined as, but not limited to tests, quizzes, whether taken electronically or on paper; projects, either individual or group; classroom
presentations, and homework. 
 
 
Academic Freedom: Students are free to disagree with instructors on matters of opinion or personal philosophy, and will incur no penalty 
from doing so. However, instructors will judge student work based upon its relation to the current state of mainstream scientific 
fact and theory. Students are allowed to voice opinions, concerns, complaints and suggestions to the instructor. However, it is up to 
the instructor to decide how to use the student’s comments to meet the class’s best interests. 
 
 
Student Discipline: Matters of student discipline will be adjudicated by the instructor on a case-by-case basis, in conjunction with the
Task Force Leader or Dean. Students may consult with the Office of Student Services or the Associate Dean at their campus on these 
matters. 
 
 
Office with Student with Disabilities: Each ACC campus offers support services for students with documented physical or psychological 
disabilities. Students with disabilities must request reasonable accommodations through the Office for Students with Disabilities
on the campus where they expect to take the majority of their classes. Students are encouraged to do this three weeks before the start
of the semester. 
 
 
COURSE OUTLINE/CALENDAR on separate page 
 
 
TESTING CENTER POLICY: Physics tests may not be given in the testing center except for make up tests. 
 
 
STUDENT SERVICES HANDOUT and INSTRUCTIONAL SERVICES HANDOUT: to be handed out to student by each instructor 
if student already does not have copy 
 

Readings

The text is Giambatista, Richardson and Richardson, "College Physics", second edition.

 

there are no other readings

Course Subjects

 

College Physics II Spring 2012
 
 
PHY 1402 Syn 47302 sect 004 
 
 
week chapter(section) event lab 
Jan 18 16 the oscilloscope 
Jan 23, 25 17 charged straws 
Jan 30, Feb 1 18 field lines 
Feb 6, 8 19 capacitance 
Feb 13, 15 20 more capacitance 
Feb 20, 22 review test resistance 
Feb 27, 29 21 currents 
Mar 5, 7 22 circuits 
Mar 12, 14 23 magnetic field 
Mar 19, 21 -spring break -
Mar 26, 28 24 magnetic field 
Apr 2, 4 25 inductance 
Apr 9, 11 review test ac circuits 
Apr 16, 18 26 refraction 
Apr 23, 25 27 Brewster’s angle 
Apr 30, May 2 28 diffraction 
May 7, 9 review final labs due May 2 
It is very important that you are registered for class 
at this time. This will be checked, and you risk losing 
time and money if matters are not as they should be. 
See me immediately if there is any doubt. 
Attendance is very important, and will be recorded for 
both class and labs. Being present for tests is manda-
tory. Test make-ups should be cleared before missing a 
test. Lab make-ups will be available on Fridays. 
Lecture Mon/ Wed, 3:00 pm - 4:20 pm Room 331 
Lab Mon/ Wed, 4:30 pm - 6:00 pm Room 326 
Office Mon/ Wed, 6:00 pm - 7:00 pm Room 325.1 
email: gink@austin.rr.com phone 223- 3303 
Tests 
Feb. 22 Chapters 16, 17, 18, 19 (100 pts) 
Apr. 11 Chapters 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25 (100 pts) 
May. 9 Chapters 26, 27, 28* this test is cumulative (150 pts) 
Ch Homework Ch Homework 
16 15, 31. 51 23 23, 32, 36, 46, 62 
17 11, 25, 41, 51, 60, 
66, 81 
24 5, 14, 30, 37, 46 
18 3, 15, 36, 39, 60, 83 25 18, 33, 50, 56 
19 9, 23, 25, 34, 47, 54 26 6, 13, 23, 28 
20 7, 23, 28, 33, 45 27 3, 7, 15, 31, 40 
21 6, 14, 19, 42, 56 28 2, 6, 13, 18, 51 
22 13, 14, 27, 34, 39,45, 61 
Your grade consists of a set of labs, homework and the three test grades. The first two tests will each count 100 points, 
and the final is 150 points; all the labs together are 150 points and the all collected homework is 100 points. Your points 
earned will be divided by 600 (the maximum number of points possible) to give a numerical grade. 
 
You need to be present for tests. Make-ups should be cleared before missing a test. The first two tests are worth 100 
points each. Your last test is cumulative and is worth 150 points. 
 
Your labs are handed within two weeks after assigned. Lab make-ups are available on Fridays. 
 
All homework assignments come from the exercises and problems section of each chapter. Your homework will be due on 
the Wednesday two weeks after the corresponding chapter is covered in class. You can ask at any time about a homework 
problem, but give it a try before asking. Remember, in doing homework, as with everywhere else, it’s important to 
explain as much as you can about what you are doing. Please don’t run different chapters together, keep them separate. 

Student Learning Outcomes/Learning Objectives

 

This is an introduction to physiscs for students not majoring in science. It requires no mathematical background, and no sciencebeyond PHYS 1405 or its equivalent. 
 
OBJECTIVES: 
In the lecture, to get a slightly deeper acquaintance with some important ideas of physics, and to get some practice thinking as aphysicist does. 
 
In the lab, to see some physical ideas made real, and to get some exposure to laboratory equipment, as well as to get some exposure 
to technical writing and using graphs and charts.