Syllabus
Emergent Literacy for Early Childhood

Emergent Literacy for Early Childhood

CDEC-1456

Fall 2011
08/22/2011 - 12/11/2011

Course Information

Section 001
Lecture
Th 6:00PM - 8:50PM
EVC8 8101
Eunice Tanco
etanco@austincc.edu
(512) 223.5204

Office Hours

No office hours have been entered for this term.

Course Requirements

Emergent Literacy                                             CDEC 1456

Synonym 38781, Section 001                                             Fall 2011

 

Syllabus

Instructor:                 Eunice Tanco

                                    Austin Community College

                                    3401 Webberville Road, Austin, Texas 78702

                                    495-9705 ext.307, work; 512-986-5437, home

                                    E-mail: eunice.tanco@austin.utexas.edu

                                                or etanco@austincc.edu

                                    Our class meets Thursday’s from 6:00 – 8:50 pm

Office Hours:           

           Eastview Campus       

Thursday      5:00 -5:55 pm

                     8:55 – 9:20 pm

 Room: Bldg. 8 Room # 8101

                        I will be glad to make an appointment with you if the above times don’t work for your schedule,    please call to schedule another meeting time.

 Please feel free to email or call my classroom at any time during the workday and at my home until 9:30 PM. 

 

 

Course Overview: CDEC 1456 is an exploration of principles, methods and materials for teaching young children language and literacy through a play-based integrated curriculum.

 Course Description: CDEC 1456 is an exploration of principles, methods and materials for teaching young children language and literacy through a play‐based integrated curriculum. Three hours of per week of supervised fieldwork with young children is required. This course is only offered in Spring Semesters. (Formally CDP1564) (4‐3‐3)

Prerequisites: CDEC/TECA 1311 and CDEC/TECA 1354 and CDEC 1413 or concurrent enrollment in CDEC 1413; and DEVR 0303 and DEVW 0403 or satisfactory score on appropriate placement test.

Corequisite: DEVR 1303 or DEVW1403 or satisfactory score on appropriate placement test.

 

Required Textbooks:  Helping Young Children Learn Language and Literacy–Third Edition by Carol Vukelich-James Christie-Billie Enz

Instructional Methodology:

This course uses a variety of instructional methods including lecture, classroom discussion, videos, small group work, lab experiences and individual and group projects.

Course Rationale:

CDEC 2341 is an introductory course to the developmental characteristics of children 5-12.  It is the only course in Child Development degree plans emphasizing the specifics of developmentally appropriate programs, guidance and activities for school age children.  As many child care centers and family day homes provide school age care, it gives Child Development majors with a well-rounded understanding of the age groups they will serve.

Student Learning Outcomes/Learning Objectives

 

NAEYC Standards

All coursework in ACC’s Child Development Department include student learning opportunities and outcomes that address the National Association for the Education of Young Children’s Standards for Early Childhood Professional Preparation in Associate Degree Programs.  The Standards intentionally cover areas of professional preparation that are required to be sure that all young children will receive the kind of early education they need and deserve.  Following are the Standards which are included in your coursework:

 

 

 

STANDARD 1: Promoting Child Development And Learning

1a: Knowing and understanding young children’s characteristics and needs

1b: Knowing and understanding the multiple influences on development and learning

1c: Using developmental knowledge to create healthy, respectful, supportive, and challenging learning environments

STANDARD 3: Observing, Documenting, And Assessing To Support Young Children And Families

3a: Understanding the goals, benefits, and uses of assessment 3b: Knowing about and using observation, documentation, and other appropriate assessment tools

STANDARD 4: Teaching And Learning

 

 

Course Policies

 

Fieldwork Placement and Lab Hours:

  1. Lab Experiences:This course has 48 required hours of field experiences in a classroom with young children. Students employed more than 30 hours a week in a child care setting working directly with young children may use their work site to complete the required hours.  For an optimum lab experience, it’s best to observe at the ACC Lab School 4 times for 3 hours each visit over the semester.  If you are employed less than 30 hours a week in a child care setting or do not work directly with young children, you must complete your lab hours at the ACC Children’s Lab School.

                  You must complete all lab hours to receive credit for this course.

         2. An observation of you working directly with young children by your instructor is required.

         3. Students enrolled in child development courses must be eligible for field experiencesas determined by the Child Development’s Eligibility for Field Experiences Policy.  The Child Development Department’s policy reflects the standards established by both:

         4. the Texas Department of Family and Protective Services, which is explained in the catalog and on the” Austin Community College Children’s Lab School Criminal Conviction Statement for Child Development Lab Students”,

         5. and criteria set by the Austin Independent School District for volunteer eligibility which prohibit anyone with a felony within the last five years for offenses involving moral turpitude (acts that are generally considered morally or ethically wrong, including crimes that involve dishonesty, fraud, deceit, theft, misrepresentation) or offenses involving drugs and /or alcohol that are not ineligible for participation in field experiences/lab word in a child care center under the Texas Department of Family and Protective Services.

 

To continue in child development coursework in which the student is currently enrolled, he or she must be eligible to participate in field experiences/lab work under these criteria.

Students who are determined as ineligible for field experiences under Texas Department of Family and Protective Services (TDFPS) criteria will need to work with the Child Department Chair, the Lab School Director and TDFPS to complete a risk assessment.  This typically takes a few months to complete and should be begun the semester before taking child development course.

 

Students who are ineligible for field experiences due to current, prior or pending felony charges within the last 5 years that are offenses of moral turpitude must obtain departmental approval prior to enrollment in child development courses. The student will meet with the Child Development Chair and the Lab School Director to discuss the student’s situation.  Factors such as the nature of the offense and a pattern of offenses will be reviewed. A student ineligible for field experiences under offenses of moral turpitude may apply for departmental approval prior to enrolling in classes or during the first week of the semester.

If the student chooses to obtain departmental approval during the first week of semester, it is possible that he or she may be asked to withdraw from their child developmental courses.

 

If any criminal record with a felony, including a pending felony charge, is returned as a result of a criminal background, the student will be withdrawn from child development courses. A student who willfully misrepresents the information on these forms will be withdrawn immediately from all Child Development coursework requiring laboratory experiences in a child care setting and may be subject to the ACC student disciplinary policy outlined in the Austin Community College Student Handbook.

 

  1. To successfully complete the lab portion of this course, you are expected to:
  2. demonstrate the behaviors required in  Minimum Standards for Licensed Child Care Centers and noted on the “Child Development Department Lab and Field Work Agreement”
  3. follow the policies of your lab placement site
  4. complete the required number of field hours noted above

 

  1. Criminal History Statement:  Because of the criteria for child care center volunteers determined by the Texas Department of Protective and Regulatory Services (TDPR) Minimum Standards for Day Care Centers,there are special requirements for enrollment in child development courses with laboratory components.  The special requirements are discussed in the Child Development section of the ACC Catalog.  Students will be required to complete a criminal history statement the first day of class, which may be submitted for verification of the information provided.  Failure to accurately report the information required by Minimum Standards for Day Care Centers will result in withdrawal from this course and possible withdrawal from Austin Community College. 

 

  1. Professional Ethics:  Please keep in mind that the children and families encountered in completing laboratory experiences for this course deserve respect at all times.   Talking or gossiping about children, families or center staff is non-respectful and undermines the trust the children and their families have in their child care providers.  It is expected that you review the NAEYC Code of Ethicsand make every attempt to follow our professional code of ethics.   The NAEYC Code of Ethics may be viewed online at http://www.naeyc.org/resources/position_statements/pseth98.pdf

Attendance:

Students are expected to attend class on a regular basis.  Attendance at each lecture is highly recommended, since so much material will be covered in class. Class attendance assures that students will receive class material and hear announcements in a timely fashion. Students are required to attend a minimum of70% of classes until the final withdrawal date – students areallowed 4 absencesuntil Thursday, November 24. The professor will complete an electronic withdrawal form for students after the 5 absence.Students will sign-in as they arrive for each class to document their attendance.

No points will be deducted for missed classes but some in-class participation activities will be graded. Students have 3 coupons to use for missed classes in which class participation activities were completed for a grade.

 

Missed Tests: Missed tests may be rescheduled with Gale or Linda only if you have a doctor’s note and must be taken within 5 days of the originally scheduled date. 

 

 

Incompletes:An incomplete means that there are extenuating circumstances which have prevented you from completing the class within the semester time-frame.   An “I” will be given upon the request of the student only if at least 60% of course and lab work has been completed in a satisfactory manner. You will then have a limited amount of time to complete the course requirements.  An automatic F results when the course is not completed as agreed upon.

Withdrawals:Students may withdraw from one or more courses prior to the withdrawal deadline by submitting a request form to Admissions and Records. Withdrawal deadlines are published in the academic calendar. Withdrawal courses appear on the student’s record with a grade of W. Until a student is officially withdrawn, the student remains on the class roll and may receive a grade of F for the course.

Students are responsible for understanding the impact withdrawing from a course may have on their financial aid, veterans’ benefits, international student status, and academic standing. Students are urged to consult with their instructor or an advisor before making schedule changes.

Per state law, students enrolling for the first time in fall 2007 or later at any Texas college or university may not withdraw (receive a W) from more than six courses during their undergraduate college career. Some exceptions for good cause could allow a student to withdraw from a course without having it count toward this limit. Students are encouraged to carefully select courses; contact an advisor or counselor for assistance.

 

'Third attempt' course tuition

Per state law, effective spring 2006 any student taking a class for the third time or more may be charged an additional $60 per credit hour unless exempted. We call it the Rule of Three or Third Course Attempt.

The Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board has mandated that all publicly funded higher-education institutions will not receive funding for courses a student takes for the third time or more. Without the state funding for those affected classes, ACC will charge additional tuition to pay for the cost of the class. The new “Third Course Attempt” tuition costs will not apply to developmental courses, Continuing Education courses, special-studies courses in which the content changes each time, or other select courses.

Students affected by this new policy should note the following:

  • This policy affects class enrollments beginning with the fall 2002 semester (Aug. 2002).
  • Financial aid may be used to cover the additional tuition charge.
  • If you are taking a class for the second time and are considering a third attempt in the future, consult with your instructor and/or advisor. ACC is here to help you succeed.
  • Appeals for waivers will be reviewed on a case-by-case basis by the relevant Dean of Student Servicesat each campus.

 

Student email All students enroll at ACC are required to have an ACC e-mail account.

Reading and Writing Requirements: This course requires that students have successfully completed Reading Fundamentals (DEVR 0300) and Writing Fundamentals (DEVW 0310) or obtained a satisfactory score on an appropriate placement test.  To remain in this course, you must be concurrently enrolled in Reading Skills Improvement (DEVR 0310) and Writing Skills I (DEVW 0320) or satisfactory score on an appropriate placement test.

 

Electronic Technology:

During all lectures and tests, please be sure that all electronic technology like cell phones, PDA’s, etc., are turned off.  Doing this prevents any misunderstanding about the use of the equipment for obtaining test information.

 

Professional Ethics: You are expected to maintain professional ethics while in this course.  Careful adherence to NAEYC’s Professional Code of Ethics when dealing with families, children, colleagues and supervising teachers is mandatory. Information about the Code of Ethics is available on NAEYC’s website at www.naeyc.org.  In addition, classroom discussions and all written work must reflect our commitment to maintaining issues of confidentiality for all children and families who allow our observations.

 

Scholastic Dishonesty:  ACC’s Scholastic Dishonesty Policy is stated in the Student Handbook: “Acts prohibited by the College for which discipline may be administered include scholastic dishonesty, including but not limited to cheating on an exam or quiz, plagiarizing, and unauthorized collaboration with another in preparing outside work.  Academic work submitted by students shall be the result of their thought, research or self-expression.  Academic work is defined as, but not limited to tests, quizzes, whether taken electronically or on paper; projects, either individual or group; classroom presentations, and homework.”  Failure to comply with this policy will result in loss of course credit for the assignments and may result in withdrawal from this course.

 

Student Freedom of ExpressionEach student is strongly encouraged to participate in an open dialog.  In any instructional situation that includes critical thinking, there are bound to be many differing viewpoints.  These differences enhance the learning experience and create an atmosphere encouraging us to think and learn.  I do expect that we respect the views of each other even if they differ substantially on volatile and sensitive topics.

 

 Students with Disabilities: The Student Handbook states that: “Each ACC campus offers support services for students with documented physical or psychological disabilities.  Students with disabilities must request reasonable accommodations through the Office for Students with Disabilities on the campus where they expect to take the majority of their classes.  Students are encouraged to do this three weeks before the start of the semester.”  The Office for Students with Disabilities for Eastview can be reached at 223-5159.  Deaf students may use Relay Texas at 711.

 

TSI Requirements:  While enrolled in CDEC 1456, you must remain enrolled in any courses you have been required to take to meet TSI requirements.   Please talk with an ACC advisor for more information.

 

 

Course Evaluation and Grading

 

  1.  In class journals and discussions                           10% of grade (10 points)

In class time will be provided to journal and discuss topics covered in the text, mini-lectures and classroom discussion.  If you miss or are late for more than 3 class meetings, you will not receive any credit for this part of your grade. (Remember that if you miss more than 4 class meetings, you may be withdrawn.)

 

  1. Lab Assignments                                                 30% of grade (30 points)

 

  1. Children’s Literature Assignment                            10 % of grade (10 points)

 

  1. Mid-Term                                                                      25 % of grade (25 points)

 

  1. Final Exam                                                        25 % of grade (25 points)

 

 

Class grades will be determined by the following scale:

100 – 90 points = A; 89- 80 points = B; 79-70 points = C; 69-60 points = D; below 60 points =F

 

 

 

CDEC 1416       Emergent Literacy     Fall 2011

Date

Topic

Assignment due:

Week 1

8/ 25

Welcome & introductions; 

Overview of course; Criminal conviction statements notarized

lab discussion/forms

                 Class Expectations

                 Course Objective and Overview

 

 

Week # 2

    9/1

Foundation of Language and Literacy

Read: Chapters 2

Write in your Journal

Week # 3

  9/8

Oral Language Development

 

Read: Chapters 3

 Write in your Journal

Week # 4

   9/15

Oral Language Develoment Cont..

Check Journals 1-9

             Read: Chapters 3

            Write in your Journal

Week #5

   9/22

Family Literacy and Language Development

 

Check Journals 10-18

             Read: Chapters 4

            Write in your Journal

Week #6

9/29

Organizing Early Language and Literacy Instruction

Turn in First Draft - Lesson Plan - Assigned Theme for (I-T-PS) – RIF project.

Week #7

10/6

Cont… Organizing Early Language and Literacy Instruction /Test Review

           Read: Chapters 5

            Write in your Journal

Check Journals 1-9

Week #8

10/13

TEST/Special Project – Develop a Theme

Midterm Test – Final Project - Theme Lesson Plan (RIF Project)

 

Check Journals 10=18

Week #9

10/20

Facilitating Early Language Learning

 

Children’s Literature Assignment

            Read: Chapters 6

            Write in your Journal

Week #10

10/27

Sharing Good Books with young Children

Book Resource File

Read: Chapters 7

            Write in your Journal

Week #11

11/3

Teaching Early Writing/

Writing with the child

 

Week #12

11/10

 

Test Review

Check Journals 1-9

             Read: Chapters 4

            Write in your Journal Read: Chpt.8-9

Week #13

11/17

Final Test

Check Journals 10-18

           

Week #14

11/24-27

Thanksgiving Week

No Class

Week #15

12/1

Keynote Speaker to Talk about Parents and Literacy

Final Project presentations

Week #16

12/8

Keynote Speaker to Talk about ELL

Final Project presentations/ Last Day of class

Other important dates:

Important Dates:

8/22                         First Day Fall Semester

10/8                         December application deadline

11/17             Last Day to withdraw

11/24-27                   Thanksgiving

12/11             Last Day Fall Semester        

 

 

        

 

  

Readings

Required Textbooks:  Helping Young Children Learn Language and Literacy–Third Edition by Carol Vukelich-James Christie-Billie Enz

 

Reading and Writing Requirements: This course requires that students have successfully completed Reading Fundamentals (DEVR 0300) and Writing Fundamentals (DEVW 0310) or obtained a satisfactory score on an appropriate placement test.  To remain in this course, you must be concurrently enrolled in Reading Skills Improvement (DEVR 0310) and Writing Skills I (DEVW 0320) or satisfactory score on an appropriate placement test.

Course Subjects

Emergent Literacy – CDEC -1456

Course Subjects

This course is about teaching the language arts-about facilitating reading, writing, speaking and listening development for children, ages birth through kindergarten. The language arts are essential to everyday life and central to all learning. Through reading, listening, writing, and talking, children come to understand the world and gain the ability to communicate effectively with others.

Chapter 1 – Foundations of Language and Literacy

            Provide an overview of the language and early literacy field. It will cover the basic principles of effective literacy instruction. Also cover the role of the parents in their young children’s development and the importance of early childhood teachers forming relationships with parents.

Chapter 2 – Oral Language development

            This chapter describes how language develops between birth and age 5. Presents updates on the language milestones for children birth to age 5. New brain research helping us learns much about children’s language development and how experiences influence the developing brain.

Chapter 3 – Family Literacy and Language Development

            This chapter focuses on family literacy and language development, specifically on how language and literacy develop in the home. In addition, the chapter includes ne special features on way parents can enhance their children’s language development.

Chapter 4 – Organizing Early Language and Literacy Instruction

            Its focus is on organizing classroom space and time to support young children’s early language and literacy learning.

Chapter 5 – Facilitating Early Language Learning

            This chapter focuses on research-based instructional strategies for facilitating young children’s early language learning. This chapter provides many descriptions of ways teacher might facilitate children’s early language learning. Because growth in vocabulary is so important, new research-based strategies are describe to explicit teach vocabulary.

Chapter 6 – Sharing Good Books with Young Children

            Consolidates information and adds new information on how to share books with young children. This chapter includes a much stronger emphasis on sharing expository books with young children because the literature is clear on the importance of children learning the text structure of expository, as well as narrative. Comprehension is a key element in this chapter, comprehension’s research- base importance to children’s success as readers. Its feature a section that highlights the adjustment teachers should make to storybook reading experiences to make them most meaningful for English Language Learners and children with special needs.

Chapter 7 – Teaching Early Reading Skills

            Focuses on the latest scientifically based reading research (SBRR) related to the teaching of early reading skills. Addresses updated information, instructional strategies in each of the core reading areas: phonological awareness, print awareness, and alphabet knowledge.

Chapter 8 – Teaching Early Writing

            This chapter provides updated references reflecting the new information on teaching writing. It includes a new Trade Secrets feature on scaffold interactive writing, new instructional ideas for teaching handwriting to young children.

Chapter 9 – Assessing Young Children’s Language and Early Literacy

            This chapter focuses on assessing young children’s language and early literacy skills. Advocate for an assess-plan-assess model. It recognizes that teachers must know about on-demand and ongoing assessment tools.

 

 

 

 

 

Student Learning Outcomes/Learning Objectives

 

Course Rationale:

CDEC 2341 is an introductory course to the developmental characteristics of children 5-12.  It is the only course in Child Development degree plans emphasizing the specifics of developmentally appropriate programs, guidance and activities for school age children.  As many child care centers and family day homes provide school age care, it gives Child Development majors with a well-rounded understanding of the age groups they will serve.

 

           Student Learning Outcomes/Learning Objectives

 

NAEYC Standards

All coursework in ACC’s Child Development Department include student learning opportunities and outcomes that address the National Association for the Education of Young Children’s Standards for Early Childhood Professional Preparation in Associate Degree Programs.  The Standards intentionally cover areas of professional preparation that are required to be sure that all young children will receive the kind of early education they need and deserve.  Following are the Standards which are included in your coursework:

 

STANDARD 1: Promoting Child Development And Learning

1a: Knowing and understanding young children’s characteristics and needs

1b: Knowing and understanding the multiple influences on development and learning

1c: Using developmental knowledge to create healthy, respectful, supportive, and challenging learning environments

STANDARD 3: Observing, Documenting, And Assessing To Support Young Children And Families

3a: Understanding the goals, benefits, and uses of assessment 3b: Knowing about and using observation, documentation, and other appropriate assessment tools

STANDARD 4: TEACHING AND LEARNING

4a: Knowing, understanding, and using positive relationships and supportive interactions

4b: Knowing, understanding, and using effective approaches, strategies, and tools for early education

4c: Knowing and understanding the importance, central concepts, inquiry tools, and structures of content areas or academic disciplines

4d: Using own knowledge and other resources to design, implement, and evaluate meaningful, challenging curriculum to promote positive outcomes

STANDARD 5: BECOMING A PROFESSIONAL

5a: Identifying and involving oneself with the early childhood field

5b: Knowing about and upholding ethical standards and other professional guidelines

5c: Engaging in continuous, collaborative learning to inform practice

5d: Integrating knowledgeable, reflective, and critical perspectives on early education

5e: Engaging in informed advocacy for children and the profession

Although Child Development courses may cover many of these Standards, each course concentrates more on specific Standards. This course concentrates through the student learning objectives described below on the Standards 1, 3A and B, 4.

 

In this course, you will: 

  • Define literacy and emergent literacy.
  • Analyze various theories of language development.
  • Describe the teacher's role in promoting emergent literacy.
  • Create environments that nurture children's literacy.
  • Select and use appropriate literature with children.
  • Use developmentally appropriate practices to guide the development of literacy rich environments and activities for young children.
  • Demonstrate the use of various techniques that promote literacy in young children like puppetry, storytelling, flannel boards, finger plays, and technology.
  • Read, informally and formally, developmentally appropriate books to children throughout the day.
  •  Provide opportunities for children to see and use print in varied contexts.