Syllabus
Introduction to Blueprint Reading for Welders

Syllabus Sections

Publish Date

05/26/2011 09:15:30

Introduction to Blueprint Reading for Welders

WLDG-1413

Fall 2011
08/22/2011 - 12/11/2011

Course Information

Section 002
Lecture
MW 10:45AM - 1:20PM
RRC5 5140.00
Troy DeFrates
tdefrate@austincc.edu
(512) 223.0357

Office Hours

No office hours have been entered for this term.

Course Requirements

 

WLDG 1413: INTRODUCTION TO

BLUEPRINT READING FOR WELDERS

 

 

Welding Technology Department

Austin Community College

 

Riverside Office: (512) 223-6443

Round Rock Office: (512) 223-0358

 

SYLLABUS

 

Revised January 1, 2010

 

Course Description

 

WLDG 1413: Introduction to Blueprint Reading for Welders (4-3-3).  A study of industrial blue­prints.  Emphasis on terminology, symbols, graphic description, and welding processes, including systems of meas­urement and industry standards.  Interpretation of plans and drawings used by in­dustry.  Instruction in the computer design of column splices, beam splices, and other welded connections using software employed by the structural detailing industry.  This course meets the College’s computer literacy requirement for the Associate of Applied Science degree in Code Welding.  Fee: $12.00.  Prerequisites: WLDG 1428 Shielded Metal Arc—Fillet Welds or WLDG 1457: Shielded Metal Arc—Groove Welds or instructor approval.  Formerly WLD 2064.

 

Course Objectives

 

Students take this course typically to satisfy one of the following objectives:

 

  • You are pursuing your Associate of Applied Science degree in Welding Technology in Code Welding or in Art Metals at Austin Community College, and this course is required for your degree.

 

  • You are pursuing your Certificate in Plate Welding or in Ultrahigh Purity Piping at Austin Com­munity Col­lege, and this course is required for your certificate. 

 

  • You would like to acquire the skills necessary for entry-level employment as a detailer in a structural welding or piping fabrication facility, or as a drafter for an engineering or architec­tural company.

 

  • You are already employed as a professional welder, but need to know more about blueprint reading.

 

Credit, Format and Costs

 

You will receive four hours of college credit when you successfully complete this course.  It is held during the summer and fall semesters and alternates with its follow-up course in the spring semester, WLDG2431: Advanced Blueprint Reading for Welders.  In the fall, the course meets twice weekly for 2:30 hours per class for sixteen weeks for a total of eighty clock hours.  In the summer, it also meets twice weekly, but for 5:20 hours per class for 7½ weeks for a total of eighty clock hours.

 

Tuition is charged at the rate posted in the current Course Schedule, depending upon whether you live in-district, out-of-district, or out-of-state.  To this tuition is added a $12.00 laboratory fee and a $3.10 insurance fee. 

 

You will also be expected to purchase (1) a computer flash drive, and (2) a hand-held calculator for determining dimensions.  These items will be described later in the syllabus. 

 

Attendance

 

Interpreting and preparing welding blueprints requires a significant amount of technical skill.  This course is designed to de­velop your skills progres­sively throughout the semester, and part of the assessment of your final grade will be based on your development of a portfolio of the pro­jects as­signed throughout the semester. 

 

These assignments are cumulative, just like math and foreign language courses, where a single missed class can cause you to fall behind in the important skills needed for subsequent classes.  In this sense, the course will be like a steamroller—ever progressing onward and rolling over those who fall behind.  The instructor will not hold back the class in order to catch up students who are absent.

 

WARNING—READ CAREFULLY!  Because atten­dance is so important, if you accumulate unexcused absences exceeding 10% of the total hours re­quired, you will be dropped from the course.  Ten percent of the total hours are equivalent to three classes in the fall or two `classes in the summer.  You will receive the grade of W.  If the final semester withdrawal date has passed, you will receive the grade of F

 

Withdrawal from Classes

 

If it becomes necessary for you to withdraw yourself from this course, consult the calendar in the current Course Schedule for the last day to withdraw and still receive the grade of W.  The date is approximately two weeks before the end of the semester).  It is not your instructor's responsibility to remind you of this date.  If you are failing and do not withdraw in time, you will be locked in with no way to avoid the final grade of F.

 

Incomplete Grades

 

The grade of Incomplete is given only if you can substan­tiate why you could not complete your final assignments due to an insurmountable conflict oc­curring after the last date for withdrawal. 

The Incomplete grade must be re­moved before the deadline during the following semester, or it will automatically convert to a fi­nal grade of F.  Consult the calendar in the current College Catalog for the Incomplete removal deadline for the following semester.  It is not your instruc­tor's re­sponsibility to remind you of this date.

 

Grading Policy

 

During the fall semester, you will have 2:30 hours each class time (5:20 hours during the sum­mer) to learn and practice new assignments in class.  Unlike typical 3-credit academic courses which meet for half as many hours, the additional time available to you in this class will allow you to complete most hands-on assignments in class.  Therefore, there will be little day-to-day home­work, although you still must study for examinations outside of class.

 

The printed versions of your projects will be due at the end of the class.  Punctuality is vital when working in industry.  Employers have no tolerance for habitual tardiness and absences, poor work ethics, or lack of production.  To simulate a work environment, late projects will not be accepted and your grade for that project will be recorded as F.

 

When calculating final grades, the following grading system is used at Austin Commu­nity College:

 

A—Excellent................. 90% - 100%.............. Grade Points 4

B—Good......................... 80% - 89%.................................... 3

C—Satisfactory............... 70% - 79%.................................... 2

D—Minimum Pass........... 60% - 69%.................................... 1

F—Fail............................. 59% - 00%.................................... 0

 

Laboratory Policy

 

  1. You will be assigned your own classroom computer.  You must select a teammate—prefer­able someone with at least minimal computer skills—to work with during class.  Teamwork is important when you encounter problems while the instructor is busy with other students.  You must also rely on your teammate to brief you on material covered if you were absent.

 

  1. Save your work often.  If you lose your work because of a computer failure and have not been saving frequently, your negligence will cost you significant lost time in reconstruct­ing your assignments.  Work lost because of your failure to save frequently is no excuse for handing in your work late.  

 

  1. Do not tamper with computer files which are not related to this class.  Other classes use these computers, and you could inadvertently corrupt an­other student’s files.

 

  1. The classroom will be available at other times for make-up work and additional practice.

Application for Graduation

 

If you are eligible for graduation with a certificate or degree in Welding Technology, you must submit your application for graduation no later than six weeks after classes begin in the fall or spring, and even earlier in the summer.  Consult the current Course Schedule for the exact date, and then contact your departmental advisor for details.  Do not miss this deadline or you will be de­layed a semester in graduating.  

 

For More Information

 

It is your responsibility to stay informed regarding the policies and deadlines that affect you as a student.  This information can be found in the following sources, which can be obtained in the Admissions Office of Building G on the Riverside Campus:

 

1.   Course Schedule (free)

2.   Student Handbook (free)

3.   College Catalog (nominal charge)

 

Computer Flash Drive

 

You will need to purchase a flash drive (also called a jump drive or a thumb drive) for saving your computer assignments.  AutoDesk Inventor files are memory intensive, so you must purchase at least a 256MB flash drive; however, with the rapid progress of technology, this is considered a low-capacity flash drive.  They are now available in 1GB, 2GB, 4GB and greater capacities, but cost becomes a factor with higher-capacity models.  Even a low-capacity 256MB flash drive will easily store your assignments for this course and the subsequent Advanced Blueprint course.

 

Calculator

 

It is vital that you use a calculator to perform the numerous calculations required for this course, both in day-to-day activities, but especially when taking examinations requiring you to convert between decimals and fractions.  Your choices are to (1) use the calculator built into your com­puter, accessed by typing the computer key located at the top of your keyboard, or (2) purchase a standard, low-cost, hand-held calculator.  It is not necessary for it to be programmable, have a high-capacity memory, or perform trigonometric functions.  We will be using only the most common functions of multiply/divide/add/subtract.

 

You will not be allowed to use a construction calculator that converts directly between decimals and fractions.  While these calculators are convenient for repetitive field work, they rob you of the initiative of learning how to use a common calculator for times when a construction calcula­tor is unavailable.

 

 

Textbook

 

A. E. Bennet and Louis J. Siy, Blueprint Reading for Welders, Delmar Publishers, Inc. cur­rent edition.

 

This is an outstanding textbook, providing enormous amounts of specific instructions and refer­ence mate­rial on blueprint reading for the welding profession.  It includes graph pa­per for sketching assignments, as well as reviews and self-tests at the end of each chapter. 

 

Suggested sources where this textbook can be obtained:

 

  1. ACC Campus Book­store in Building G on the River­side Campus
  2. University Co-Op, 2237 East Riverside Drive at Willow Creek Drive, (512) 4474376
  3. http://www.amazon.com
  4. http://www.barnesandnoble.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Structural Assembly Project

Designing Your Own Workshop

 

The objective of this structural assembly project is to design your own workshop using Autodesk Inventor.  In designing it, you will learn to use the fabrication criteria of the American Institute for Steel Construction AISC Design Manual and the welding criteria of the American Welding Soci­ety AWS D1.1: Structural Welding Code—Steel.

 

Your final grade will be based on your completion of the following criteria:

 

                  ê  PROJECTS                                êMODEL        êPRINT              êDATE

 

            1.  Base Plate........................................................................................... 2 %.................

            2.  Lower Column.................................................................................... 2 %.................

            3.  Column Splice Plate......................................................................... 2 %.................

            4.  Structural Bolt..................................................................................... 2 %.................

            5.  Structural Nut..................................................................................... 2 %.................

            6.  Structural Washer.............................................................................. 2 %.................

            7.  Backing Bar........................................................................................ 2 %.................

            8.  Upper Column.................................................................................... 2 %.................

            9.  Cap Plate............................................................................................ 2 %.................

            10.  Shear Plate....................................................................................... 2 %.................

            11.  Stiffener............................................................................................ 2 %.................

            12.  Column Splice Assembly............................................................... 4 %.................

            13.  Cross Beam...................................................................................... 2 %.................

            14.  Beam Splice Plate........................................................................... 2 %.................

            15.  Beam Splice Assembly................................................................... 4 %.................

            16.  Frame Assembly.............................................................................. 4 %.................

            17.  Lateral Beam.................................................................................... 2 %.................

            18.  Framing Angle................................................................................. 2 %.................

            19.  Lateral Beam Assembly.................................................................. 4 %.................

            20.  Bay Assembly.................................................................................. 4 %.................

            21.  Bay Assembly with Slab and Cladding....................................... 4 %.................

                                                                                                   = 54% cumulative to this point  

Portfolio of Autodesk Inventor™ projects above must

be in clear sheet protectors in a 3-ring notebook................................................ 6 %...........

                                                                                                   = 60% cumulative to this point

 

            Field Trip to A&E CAD Department / Northridge Campus..................... 8 %...........

            Examination No. 1........................................................................................ 8 %...........

            Examination No. 2........................................................................................ 8 %...........

            Examination No. 3........................................................................................ 8 %...........

            Examination No. 4........................................................................................ 8 %...........

 

Total Percentage (100% possible)................................ Final Grade..................................


Reference Material for Converting

Fractions to Decimals

 

Objective

 

To learn how to add, subtract, multiply, divide, and find the area of dimensions that are given in feet, inches, and fractions of an inch.

 

Concept

 

1.   First, convert each of the dimensions, which will be given in feet, inches, and fractions of an inch, into their equivalents in decimal inches.

 

2.   Then add, subtract, multiply, divide, or find the area of these decimal numbers, depending on what is required by the problem.

 

3.   Finally, convert the results back into feet, inches, and fractions of an inch.

 

How to Convert a Fractional Dimension

to a Decimal Dimension

 

13’-7 5/16”

Step 1

13’

+

7”

+

5/16”

Solution

Step 2

13’

x12”

156”

 

 

 

 

 

Step 3

 

 

7”

 

 

 

Step 4

 

 

 

 

5÷16=

.3125”

 

Step 5

156”

+

7”

+

.3125”

= 163.3125”

 

Step 1:   Break out the total length into three smaller lengths

Step 2:   Convert feet to inches by multiplying by 12”

Step 3:   Bring down the whole inches unchanged

Step 4:   Convert the fraction to a decimal by dividing the numerator by the            denominator

Step 5:   Add the three columns

 

 

 

 

 

 

How to Convert a Decimal Dimension

Back to a Fractional Dimension

 

163.3125”

Step 1

163.3125”÷12”=

13.609375’

 

 

 

 

Solution

Step 2

13’

 

.609375’

 

 

 

Step 3

 

 

.609375’x12”=

7.3125”

 

 

 

Step 4

 

 

7”

 

 

 

Step 5

 

 

 

 

.3125”x16=

5

as in 5/16”

 

Step 6

13’

+

7”

+

5/16”

= 13’-7 5/16”

 

Step 1:   Convert decimal inches to feet by dividing by 12”

Step 2:   Separate the whole number in feet from its decimal numbers

Step 3:   Multiply the decimal numbers by 12” to get inches

Step 4:   Separate the whole number in inches from its decimal numbers

Step 5:   Multiply the decimal numbers by 16 to get a fraction.  If necessary,           reduce the fraction to its common, recognizable form by dividing the       numerator and denominator repeatedly by 2 (e.g., 12/16” = 6/8” = 3/4”)

Step 6:   Add the three columns

 

How to Apply This Information

to Real-World Situations

 

Addition

 

Situation:  You are splicing two beams together to make one continuous beam.  One beam is 11'-5 3/16" long and the other beam is 14'-8 7/8" long.  What is the total length of this beam splice?

 

Problem:  11'-5 3/16" + 14'-8 7/8"

 

  1. Convert 11'-5 3/16" to its decimal equivalent = 137.1875"
  2. Convert 14'-8 7/8" to its decimal equivalent = 176.875"
  3. Add 137.1875" + 176.875" = 314.0625"
  4. Convert 314.0625" back to feet, inches, and fractions of an inch = 26'-2 1/16"

 

 

 

 

 

Subtraction

 

Situation:  You are fabricating a column that is 15'-4 9/16" long, from which you must cut off

7'-10 5/8".  How much of the column is left?

 

Problem:  15'-4 9/16" - 7'-10 5/8"

 

  1. Convert 15'-4 9/16" to its decimal equivalent = 184.5625"
  2. Convert 7'-10 5/8" to its decimal equivalent = 94.625"
  3. Subtract 184.5625" - 94.625" = 89.9375"
  4. Convert 89.9375" back to feet, inches, and fractions of an inch = 7'-5 15/16"

 

Multiplication

 

Situation:  You must provide a client with fifteen pieces of round stock cut into 3'-2 1/8" lengths.  What is the total length of the fifteen pieces?

 

Problem:  3'-2 1/8" x 15 pieces

 

  1. Convert 3'-2 1/8" to its decimal equivalent = 38.125"
  2. Multiply 38.125" x 15 pieces = 571.875"
  3. Convert 571.875" back to feet, inches, and fractions of an inch = 47'-7 7/8"

 

Division

 

Situation:  You have a 20'-0" length of angle, from which you must cut brackets 2'-2 5/16" long.  How many brackets will the 20'-0" length yield?

 

Problem:  20'-0" 2'-2 5/16"

 

  1. Convert 2'-2 5/16" to its decimal equivalent = 26.3125"
  2. Convert 20'-0" into inches by multiplying 20' x 12" per foot = 240"
  3. Divide 240" 26.3125" = 9.12114 brackets, or 9 full-length brackets

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Area

 

Situation:  You are building a workshop over a concrete slab 20'-8 9/16" wide x 35'-2 7/8" long.  What is the area of the slab?

 

Problem:  20'-8 9/16" x 35'-2 7/8"

 

  1. Convert 20'-8 9/16" to its decimal equivalent = 248.5625"
  2. Convert 35'-2 7/8" to its decimal equivalent = 422.875"
  3. Multiply 248.5625" x 422.875" = 105,110.87 in2
  4. Divide 105,110.87 in2 144 in2 per ft2 = 729.936587 ft2           

 

[End of Document]

Readings

 

Textbook

 

A. E. Bennet and Louis J. Siy, Blueprint Reading for Welders, Delmar Publishers, Inc. cur­rent edition.

 

This is an outstanding textbook, providing enormous amounts of specific instructions and refer­ence mate­rial on blueprint reading for the welding profession.  It includes graph pa­per for sketching assignments, as well as reviews and self-tests at the end of each chapter. 

 

Suggested sources where this textbook can be obtained:

 

  1. ACC Campus Book­store in Building G on the River­side Campus
  2. University Co-Op, 2237 East Riverside Drive at Willow Creek Drive, (512) 4474376
  3. http://www.amazon.com
  4. http://www.barnesandnoble.com