Syllabus
United States History II

United States History II

HIST-1302

Spring 2012
03/19/2012 - 05/13/2012

Course Information

Section 111
Distance Learning
ONL RRC
David Haney
dhaney@austincc.edu
(512) 223.0080

Office Hours

No office hours have been entered for this term.

Course Requirements

 

COURSE OBJECTIVE
This course surveys the major developments in the history of the United States and its people since 1877.
 
COURSE ORIENTATION
You have reached the online orientation. To complete the on-line orientation, please read this Syllabus and the Study Guide, and complete the Information Sheet by pasting its contents into an e-mail message and sending it to me at dhaney@austincc.edu, using the subject heading "HIST 1302 Information Sheet."  (Questions about the course should also be directed to that e-mail address, accompanied by your name -- please do not ask a question without identifying yourself and your course within your message, so that I can determine who is seeking help or clarification.)

If you are unable to use e-mail to send the information sheet, you must contact me at 223-0080 within one week of Late Registration, or you risk being dropped from the course.

PLEASE NOTE: ACC Student Services now offers distance learning students a variety of forms of assistance with their distance learning experience.  Click here to view the web site.
 
 
COURSE DESCRIPTION
This section is a distance learning version of the standard United States History survey course. The student will be required to do the same amount of work and the same quality of work as students enrolling in the classroom equivalent of the course. This course is designed for mature and capable students endowed with a great degree of self-discipline and responsibility and knowledge of personal computers and the Internet.

This course does not contain a lecture component, which means that students must learn the course material exclusively from their reading assignments (though consultations with the instructor are of course readily available).  Students who perform well under these conditions are typically those who read actively and regularly (for pleasure, to remain informed of current events, to learn about the past, etc.) .  Students who do not fit this description should consider dropping this section and adding a classroom section of the course, in which lectures and discussions supplement and reinforce course reading assignments. 

Also, for Early College Start students, keep in mind that I am prohibited by Family Educational Records Privacy Act of 1974 from communicating with parents or anyone other than you, so contact me directly.



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Please take note: The Family Educational Records Privacy Act also prohibits faculty from discussing specific grade matters with students by e-mail, since e-mail is neither a private nor a secure mode of communication.  Students are therefore asked to send questions about test scores and course grades through the "Messages" function in the Blackboard system.  (After logging in, choose the "Control Panel" link and then click the "Messages" option.)  It is then a good idea to send me an e-mail to alert me that a message is waiting for me there.
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TEXTBOOK: James West Davidson, et., al., Experience History, Vol. 2 (Texas Edition)
Note: The Texas Edition of this book is identical to the regular one, except that its illustrations are all in black and white instead of color.  Therefore, the regular, color edition is a viable alternative.  (New copies of this color version are quite expensive, so a used copy is a more cost-effective option for that one.)  Also, on-line merchants like Amazon.com, Abe Books, and Alibris are listing it for significantly less, but if you are considering this option, decide quickly, so that you are assured of receiving your ordered book in time to prepare for the first exam.  Some on-line sellers offer expedited delivery, but at a higher shipping price. You will not be needing an edition of this book that includes a CD ROM or an access code for on-line resources.  

ON-LINE DOCUMENTS
Each unit of the course includes a small selection of on-line documents, each of which is paired with a set of study questions.  Ten questions on each exam will be drawn from these study questions.  These documents can be found on the Study Guide.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS
The student's final course grade is determined by the quality and quantity of the student's work. The following requirements are non-negotiable:


For a grade of "C" or better in the course, the student must contact the instructor, either in person, by telephone, or by e-mail twice during the semester: once after the completion of Test #2 and once after the completion of Test #4.  Anyone failing to make these contacts may not receive credit for the course.

For the grade of "C": In addition to the two course contacts, the student must take all 4 tests and make an overall course average of 70% (35 correct out of 50 questions.)  There are no further requirements.

For the grade of "B": The student may earn this grade under either Option 1 or Option 2.
  • For the grade of "B" (Option 1): In addition to the two course contacts, the student must take all 4 tests and make an overall course average of 80% (40 correct out of 50 questions) and complete one analytical book review.   An average means you score sometimes above 40 and sometimes less, but your average of all grades is 80%.  This B-Level Objective is described in the Study Guide.
  • For the grade of "B" (Option 2): In addition to the two course contacts, the student must take all 4 tests, and make 40 or better on each test.  In this case, no book report is required.

For the grade of "A": The student may earn this grade under either Option 1 or Option 2.
      • For the grade of "A" (Option 1): In addition to the two course contacts, the student must take all 4 tests and make an overall course average of 80% (40 correct out of 50 questions) and produce two analytical book reviews. The A-Level Objective is described in the Study Guide.
      • For the grade of "A" (Option 2): In addition to the two course contacts, the student must take all 4 tests and receive 40 or better on each test, and also produce one analytical book review as described in the Study Guide.
You must have the books for your A- and B-Level Objectives (the analytical book reviews) approved by the instructor by Monday, April 9.

You must turn in your analytical book review (B-Level Objective) or reviews (A-Level Objective) by the deadline of Friday, May 10.

All of these deadlines will be strictly enforced! There will be no extensions for these deadlines and you will not receive credit for any work (either tests, retests, or A-Level or B-Level Objectives) submitted after the above deadlines.

 
TESTING POLICIES
Each test must be taken on a computer in one of the ACC Testing Centers, which are located at the RGC, NRG, RVS, RRC, CYP, EVC, SMC, SAC, FBG or PIN campuses. See the Testing Center Website for operating hours and other details. 

Each test will utilize the Blackboard system , and test-taking is limited to Testing Center sites.  Tests are accessible only through the activation of the Respondus lockdown browser, which prevents the taking of the exams from any non-Testing Center location and the opening of Web pages other than the one containing the test  Upon checking in at the Testing Center to take each test, you will be assigned to a computer station and will need to log into the Blackboard system using your ACC EID and password.  Under the general menu for this course, find the "Tests" category, and select the particular test you have come to take.  For more information on this testing process, please visit http://irt.austincc.edu/respondus/students.html .

Students may take the tests as early as they are ready; however, every student must take the tests by the following deadlines:
Test #1: Thursday, March 29
Test #2: Thursday, April 12
Test #3: Thursday, April 26
Test #4: Thursday, May 10

Each test will consist of 50 questions that focus on the learning objectives and study questions found in the Study Guide on-line.  You must score at least 35 correct answers out of 50 (70%) to pass the test.

After you complete a test and submit your answers within Blackboard, the Respondus system will immediately report your score on the screen.  At this time, your score will also be entered in the Blackboard system's "Gradebook" category.

WITHDRAWAL POLICY: If you fail to meet the test deadlines, you risk being withdrawn from the course by the instructor. This withdrawal decision is at the discretion of the instructor. If you determine during the course of the semester that you will not be able to successfully fulfill the requirements of this course, you should withdraw yourself. The deadline for withdrawing is Monday, May 7.  No withdrawals or reinstatements may be made after this deadline.

COURSE COMPLETION VERIFICATION: Each student is required to contact the instructor, either in person, by telephone, or by e-mail after completing Test #2 and Test #4. The contact after Test #4 will serve as a course completion verification and must be done before Friday, May 11, 2012 at 9:00 a.m.  During this conference we will verify your test scores, review any projects submitted for an "A" or "B", and determine your course grade. Failure to complete this conference requirement may imperil the prompt reporting of your grade!! This is as much a requirement of the course as any other grading requirement.

Finally, before the last week of the term, please complete the course evaluation at http://www.austincc.edu/hr/eval/DistanceLearningEvaluation.php

Readings

Required Textbook

The required textbook is James West Davidson, Experience History, Vol. 2 (Texas Edition).  See the Syllabus and/or "Course Requirements" above for further information on options for purchasing this book.

 

Primary Sources (please see the Study Guide for study questions to facilitate the reading of these documents):

 Charles M. Beard, selection from American Nervousness  

The Omaha Platform of the People's Party (1892) 

 Albert J. Beveridge, "In Support of an American Empire" (1898)   

 "Aguinaldo's Case Against the United States" (1899)   

 Mary Harris "Mother" Jones, "March of the Mill Children"

 Rudolph Fisher, "The City of Refuge" 

 The Hollywood Production Code of the 1930s

Franklin Roosevelt, "First Inaugural Address" (1933) 

Martin Luther King, "Letter from Birmingham City Jail"    
Lyndon Johnson, Address at Johns Hopkins University: "Peace Without Conquest" (1965)   

Mario Savio, "An End to History" (1964) 

Martin Luther King, "Beyond Vietnam" (1967)

Rodolfo "Corky" Gonzales, "I Am Joaquin" (1967)
National Congress of American Indians, "Watts and Little Big Horn" (1966)

          Pat Mainardi, "The Politics of Housework" (1969)

 

 

Analytical Book Review(s) 

Note: This requirement only applies to Option 1 under the A- and B-Level requirements.  See the syllabus for more details.

Rationale:
This analytical book review will critically examine an important scholarly book covering some aspect of United States History since 1877. The purpose of the review is twofold: first, to acquaint the student with a classic volume of historical scholarship and second, to allow the student to think critically about an important facet of American history and then to organize your thoughts in clear, cogent prose. You should not view this simply as a hurdle which you must overcome in order to earn a grade of "A" or "B" (Option #1 in each case), but rather approach it as an opportunity to expand your creativity in thinking and writing, two very important aspects of any individual's necessary life skills. Therefore, be advised that I consider this a very important aspect of this course and your reviews will be read and graded very carefully.
 
Form: Each book review must be approximately 4-5 pages in length, with standard margins of 1.25 inches on each side, and font of either Times New Roman (size 12) or Arial (size 11). The main objective of this analytical book review should be to comprehensively cover the three sections of the following book review outline:
 
Part I: This is a brief outline of the contents of the book. In the space of one or two paragraphs you should be able to convey the parameters of the book's contents.  Then, provide summaries of each chapter's contents (which may take a few paragraphs).  Do not simply reproduce the book's table of contents.
 
Part II: Here is the place for a careful summary of the author's thesis. The thesis is the primary idea the author is trying to prove and convince the reader to accept as valid. You must first identify the thesis and then show how the author either substantiates or fails to substantiate this thesis. You should quote portions of the book in order to answer this part of the review, and you will need to cite page numbers for these quotations. This will undoubtedly take you a page or two to do a good job.
 
Part III: This is your personal evaluation of the book, in which you describe your reaction to the book and put its contents in a comparative perspective with your textbook. Some of the questions you must answer include: Do you agree or disagree with the book's conclusions? Why or why not? Did the book support or contradict what you read in your textbook on the same subject? (You must quote some of the relevant passages from both books, citing page numbers. Citations of page numbers at the ends of quotes and paraphrases are adequate for this -- footnotes are not required.)   Did you detect any biases on the part of the author? What was the author's background, and why did he or she write the book? How in your opinion could the book have been improved? You must be specific and keep in mind there are NO perfect books. Did you enjoy reading this book? Why or why not? Would you recommend it to others?

To submit the paper to the instructor, use the "Digital Dropbox" function within the Blackboard system only!!!  Please do not e-mail papers, but do e-mail me to let me know that a paper is waiting for me in the Dropbox.  No rough drafts will be accepted -- I will not offer feedback for a "re-write."
 
Grading: The book review will be graded "Accepted" or "Not Accepted."   No analytical book reviews will be accepted after the deadline date in the syllabus!
 

Books: The following books, all of which are found in the ACC libraries, the UT library system, and Austin Public Library branches, may be read for the analytical book review.  Books can be checked out of non-ACC academic libraries with a TexShare card.  See the TexShare website for more information.

If you wish to substitute another book for one of these titles, YOU MUST RECEIVE THE INSTRUCTOR'S PRIOR APPROVAL.  With permission, books of more than 350 pages can be read in part, rather than in their entirety.  (In such cases, the portions to be read must be arranged with the instructor.)


The West
Heather Cox Richardson, West After Appamattox: Reconstruction of America After the Civil War
Ralph Andrist, The Long Death: The Last Days of the Plains Indians


The Gilded Age and the Rise of Big Business
H.W. Brands, American Colossus: The Triumph of Capitalism, 1865-1900
Ruth Rosen, The Lost Sisterhood: Prostitution in America, 1900-1918
William R. Leach, Land of Desire: Merchants, Power, and the Rise of a New American Culture
John F. Kasson, Houdini, Tarzan, and the Perfect Man: The White Male Body and the Challenge of Modernity in America
Lawrence Goodwyn, The Populist Movement
John Bodnar, The Transplanted: A History of Immigrants in Urban America
C. Van Woodward, The Strange Career of Jim Crow
M.H. Dunlop, Gilded City: Scandal and Sensation in Turn-of-the-Century New York
Tom Crouch, A Dream of Wings: Americans & the Airplane, 1875-1905
Jeffrey L. Cruikshank, The Man Who Sold America: The Amazing (but True!) Story of Albert D. Lasker and the Creation of the Advertising Century


The Spanish-American War and U.S. Imperialism
David Traxel, 1898: The Birth of the American Century
Warren Zimmermann, First Great Triumph: How Five Americans Made Their Country a World Power
Stuart Creighton Miller, "Benevolent Assimilation": The American Conquest of the Philippines, 1899-1903


The Progressive Era
B. Hobson, Uneasy Virtue: The Politics of Prostitution and the American Reform Tradition
David Nasaw, Children of the City: At Work and At Play
James Barrett, Work and Community in the Jungle: Chicago's Packinghouse Workers, 1894-1922
David Nasaw, Going Out: The Rise and Fall of Public Amusements
Stephen J. Diner, A Very Different Age: Americans of the Progressive Era
Kathy Lee Peiss, Cheap Amusements: Working Women and Leisure in Turn-of-the-Century New York


World War I
David M. Kennedy, Over Here: The First World War and American Society
John Milton Cooper, Jr., Breaking the Heart of the World: Woodrow Wilson & the Fight for the League of Nations
Adam Hochschild, To End All Wars: A Story of Loyalty and Rebellion, 1914-1918

The 1920s
Lynn Dumenil, The Modern Temper: American Culture and Society in the 1920s
Daniel Okrent, Last Call: The Rise and Fall of Prohibition
Joshua Zeitz, Flapper: A Madcap Story of Sex, Style, Celebrity, and the Women Who Made America Modern
Edward J. Larson, Summer for the Gods: The Scopes Trial and America's Continuing Debate Over Science and Religion
Susan Smulyan, Selling Radio: The Commercialization of American Broadcasting, 1920-1934
David Levering Lewis, When Harlem Was in Vogue
Humbert Nelli, The Business of Crime: Italians and Syndicate Crime in the US
Stephen B. Goddard, Getting There: The Epic Struggle between Road and Rail in the American Century
Peter Kobel, Silent Movies: The Birth of Film and the Triumph of Movie Culture
Mitchell Zuckoff, Ponzi's Scheme: The True Story of a Financial Legend


The Great Depression
John Kenneth Galbraith, The Great Crash
Robert S. McCelvaine, The Great Depression: America, 1929-1941
Alan Brinkley, Voices of Protest: Huey Long, Father Coughlin and the Great Depression
David M. Kennedy, Freedom from Fear: The American People in Depression and War, 1929-1945


World War II
John Dower, War Without Mercy: Race and Power in the Pacific War
John Howard, Concentration Camps on the Home Front: Japanese Americans in the House of Jim Crow
Ronald Takaki, Double Victory: A Multicultural History of America in World War II
David Wyman, The Abandonment of the Jews: America and the Holocaust
Karen Anderson, Wartime Women: Sex Roles, Family Relations and the Status of Women During World War II
Donald Worster, Dust Bowl: The Southern Plains in the 1930s
Edwin Black, Nazi Nexus: America's Corporate Connections to Hitler's Holocaust


The Dawn of the Cold War
Paul S. Boyer, By the Bomb's Early Light: American Thought and Culture at the Dawn of the Atomic Age
Mark Landis, Joseph McCarthy: The Politics of Chaos
Max Hastings, The Korean War
Robert A. Divine, Eisenhower and the Cold War
Steven Kinzer, All the Shah's Men: An American Coup and the Roots of Middle East Terror
Stephen Schlesinger, Bitter Fruit: The Story of the American Coup in Guatemala
Greg Grandin, The Last Colonial Massacre: Latin America in the Cold War


The Culture of the 1950s
Tom Lewis, Divided Highways: Building the Interstate Highways, Transforming American Life
Wini, Breines, Young, White, and Miserable: Growing Up Female in the 1950s
Lisa McGirr, Suburban Warriors: The Origins of the New American Right
Susan J. Douglas, Where the Girls Are: Growing Up Female With the Mass Media
Howell Raines, My Soul Is Rested: Movement Days in the Deep South Remembered
Lynn Spigel, Make Room for TV: Television and the Family Ideal in Postwar America
Glenn C. Altschuler, All Shook Up: How Rock 'n' Roll Changed America


The Vietnam War
David Halberstram, The Best and the Brightest
Frances FitzGerald, Fire in the Lake
Ronald H. Spector, After Tet: The Bloodiest Year in Vietnam
Gabriel Kolko, Anatomy of a War: Vietnam, the United States, and the Modern Historical Experience
Nancy Zarroulis and G. Sullivan, Who Spoke Up? American Protest Against the War in Vietnam, 1963-1975
Truong Nhu Tang, A Vietcong Memoir: An Inside Account of the Vietnam War and Its Aftermath
Jerry Lembcke, The Spitting Image: Myth, Memory, and the Legacy of Vietnam
Christian G. Appy, Working-Class War: American Combat Soldiers and Vietnam
H.R. McMaster, Dereliction of Duty: Johnson, McNamara, the Joint Chiefs of Staff, and the Lies That Led to Vietnam


Society and Culture in the 1960s
Maurice Isserman, America Divided: The Civil War of the 1960s
Jay Stevens, Storming Heaven: LSD and the American Dream
David Allyn, Make Love, Not War: The Sexual Revolution: An Unfettered History
Thomas Frank, The Conquest of Cool: Business Culture, Counterculture, and the Rise of Hip Consumerism
James Miller, Democracy Is in the Streets: From Port Huron to the Siege of Chicago
Tom Wolfe, The Right Stuff
Anthony Lewis, Gideon's Trumpet
Elaine Tyler May, America and the Pill: A History of Promise, Peril, and Liberation


Watergate and the Culture of the 1970s
Jonathan Schell, The Time of Illusion
Ruth Rosen, The World Split Open: How the Modern Women's Movement Changed America
Rodolfo Acuña, Occupied America: A History of Chicanos
Susan Ferriss & Ricardo Sandoval, Fight in the Fields: César Chávez & the Famworker's Movement
Bruce Schulman, The Seventies: The Great Shift in American Culture, Society, and Politics
Philip Jenkins, Decade of Nightmares: The End of the Sixties and the Making of Eighties America
Andreas Killen, 1973 Nervous Breakdown: Watergate, Warhol, and the Birth of Post-Sixties America
Jefferson R. Cowie, Stayin' Alive: The 1970s and the Last Days of the Working Class


The 1980s
Mark Danner, The Massacre at El Mozote
Haynes Johnson, Sleepwalking Through History: America in the Reagan Years
Peter Dale Scott and Jonathan Marshall, Cocaine Politics: Drugs, Armies, and the CIA in Central America
Thomas Byrne Edsall, Chain Reaction: The Impact of Race, Rights, and Taxes on American Politics
William Klenknecht, The Man Who Sold the World: Ronald Reagan and the Betrayal of Main Street America


The Post-Cold War Era
David Halberstam, War in a Time of Peace: Bush, Clinton & the Generals
Robert Kagan, Of Paradise & Power: America and Europe in the New World Order
Haynes Johnson, The Best of Times
Richard A. Posner, An Affair of State: The Investigation, Impeachment, and Trial of President Clinton
Ross Gelbspan, The Heat Is On: The Climate Crisis; The Cover-Up; The Prescription
Jacob Hacker, The Great Risk Shift: The New Economic Insecurity and the Decline of the American Dream
Craig Unger, House of Bush, House of Saud: The Secret Relationship Between the World's Two Most Powerful Dynasties
Craig Unger, The Fall of the House of Bush
John Cassidy, dot.com
Bethany Moreton, To Serve God and Wal-Mart: The Making of Christian Free Enterprise


Miscellaneous Subjects Spanning Multiple Eras
Eric Schlosser, Fast Food Nation: The Dark Side of the All-American Meal
Nicholas Lemann, The Big Test: The Secret History of the American Meritocracy
Nicholas Lemann, The Promised Land: The Great Black Migration and How It Changed America
Samuel G. Freedman, The Inheritance: How Three Families and the American Political Majority Moved from Left to Right
C. Roland Marchand, Creating the Corporate Soul

Course Subjects

1. Big Business and the Modern Corporation

2. The Cultures of the Industrial City: Immigrant Workers

3. The Cultures of the Industrial City: The Middle Class

4. The Social, Economic, and Political Turmoil of the 1890s

5. The Evolution of U.S. Imperialism

6. The Birth of Modern American Music and Art

7. The Progressive Movement

8. World War I

9. The "Modern" Culture of the 1920s 

10. Economic Weaknesses of the '20s; The Depression Experience in the Early '30s

11. The Evolution of Modern Liberalism: The First New Deal

12. The Evolution of Modern Liberalism: The Second New Deal
13. World War II and the Birth and Escalation of the Cold War
14. McCarthyism and the Red Scare

15. The Civil Rights Movement

16. Liberalism in the 1960s

17. The Vietnam War

18. The 1960s Student Movement and the Counterculture
19. Nixon, Vietnam, and Watergate
20. The Multicultural Explosion of the 1970s
21. The Rise of Modern Conservatism
22. U.S. Foreign Policy after Vietnam

Student Learning Outcomes/Learning Objectives

 

A list of the ACC History Department's learning objectives for this course can be found at http://www2.austincc.tx.us/history/1302syll  .
 

TEST 1

This test will consist of the following:

(1) Multiple-choice questions derived from the study questions listed below for the Divine textbook, chapters 18-21 (30 points).

(2)
Multiple-choice questions on the linked primary-source documents that are included with particular textbook chapters below (10 points).

(3) A map labeled only with letters of the alphabet, on which you must identify the following locations that have figured prominently in the major events and developments of this portion of the course (10 points):

  • Selected states within the U.S.
  • The Great Lakes
  • The Union Pacific, Central Pacific, Northern Pacific, and Southern Pacific Railroad lines
  • The following cities: New York, Chicago, Philadelphia, Pittsburgh, Washington, D.C., St. Louis, and San Francisco


Test 1 Study Questions
Suggestion: Instead of doing a large amount of highlighting or taking voluminous notes on these questions, consider simply marking your text's margin with the numeral of each question where the answer to that question is located.  This approach removes the need for extensive (and time-consuming) underlining, highlighting, and/or note-taking, and it therefore allows for both efficient reading and reviewing.


 



TEST 2

This test will consist of the following:

(1) Multiple-choice questions derived from the study questions listed below for the Divine textbook, chapters 22-25 (30 points).

(2) Multiple-choice questions on the linked primary-source documents that are included with particular textbook chapters below (10 points).

(3) A map labeled only with letters of the alphabet, on which you must identify the following locations that have figured prominently in the major events and developments of this portion of the course (10 points):


China, Japan, Spain, the Philippines, the Hawaiian Islands, Guam, Cuba, Puerto Rico, Panama, Colombia, Nicaragua, Mexico, Great Britain, France, Belgium, Russia, Germany, Austria-Hungary, Serbia, and the Ottoman Empire.


Test 2 Study Questions
Suggestion: Instead of doing a large amount of highlighting or taking voluminous notes on these questions, consider simply marking your text's margin with the numeral of each question where the answer to that question is located.  This approach removes the need for extensive (and time-consuming) underlining, highlighting, and/or note-taking, and it therefore allows for both efficient reading and reviewing.




TEST 3
 
This test will consist of the following:

(1) Multiple-choice questions derived from the study questions listed below for the Divine textbook, chapters 26-29 (30 points).

(2)
Multiple-choice questions on the linked primary-source documents that are included with particular textbook chapters below (10 points).

(3) A map labeled only with letters of the alphabet, on which you must identify the following locations that have figured prominently in the major events and developments of this portion of the course (10 points):

Germany (and Cold War-era East and West Germany), Austria,
France, Holland, Great Britain, the Soviet Union, Italy, Poland, Czechoslovakia, Hungary, Romania, Bulgaria, Greece, Japan, China, Manchuria, French Indochina, Korea, and Taiwan.


Test 3 Study Questions
Suggestion: Instead of doing a large amount of highlighting or taking voluminous notes on these questions, consider simply marking your text's margin with the numeral of each question where the answer to that question is located.  This approach removes the need for extensive (and time-consuming) underlining, highlighting, and/or note-taking, and it therefore allows for both efficient reading and reviewing.


Chapter 26  (Study questions are under construction.)
Read also Korematsu v. United States (1944), using these study questions.

Chapter 27 (Study questions are under construction.)


Chapter 28 (Study questions are under construction.)


Chapter 29(Study questions are under construction.)
Read also Rachel Carson, "Beyond the Dreams of the Borgias" (from Silent Spring, 1962), using these study questions.

 

 
TEST 4

This test will consist of the following:

(1) Multiple-choice questions derived from the study questions listed below for the Divine textbook, chapters 30-32 (30 points).

(2)
Multiple-choice questions on the linked primary-source documents that are included with particular textbook chapters below (10 points).

(3) A map labeled only with letters of the alphabet, on which you must identify the following locations that have figured prominently in the major events and developments of this portion of the course (10 points):

Cuba, the Dominican Republic, Panama, Nicaragua, Chile, Argentina,
Guatemala, El Salvador, Vietnam, Cambodia, Yugoslavia (Serbia, Croatia, Bosnia, Herzegovina), Iran, Iraq, and Somalia


Test 4 Study Questions
Suggestion: Instead of doing a large amount of highlighting or taking voluminous notes on these questions, consider simply marking your text's margin with the numeral of each question where the answer to that question is located.  This approach removes the need for extensive (and time-consuming) underlining, highlighting, and/or note-taking, and it therefore allows for both efficient reading and reviewing.


Chapter 30 (Study questions are under construction.)
Read also Lyndon B. Johnson, "Peace Without Conquest" (1965), using these study questions.
Read also Martin Luther King, "Beyond Vietnam" (1968), using these study questions.

Chapter 31 (Study questions are under construction.)
Read also Betty Friedan, "The Problem That Has No Name" (from The Feminine Mystique, 1963), using these study questions.

Chapter 32 (Study questions are under construction.)
 




HIS 1302 (PCM) Sample Test Questions

The following are sample test questions you will encounter on the exams covering the textbook material. They are multiple-choice questions, and they are derived from the study questions available at the links for each chapter posted above.  These questions are also based upon the History Department's Common Course Objectives, which can be viewed at http://www.austincc.edu/history/1302syll.

Sample A
The Great Plains seem to offer very little to Americans before the Civil War for each of the following reasons except
A. they were regarded as possessing insufficient supplies of water.
B. they lacked abundant quantities of timber.
C. they lacked sufficient animal life to sustain human habitation.
D. they experienced brutal seasonal temperature extremes.


Sample B
Which of the following best describes the way of life of the tribes of the Great Plains?
A. sedentary and peaceful
B. based on fishing and farming
C. nomadic and warlike
D. urban and bureaucratic