Syllabus
Microprocessor

Microprocessor

CETT-1445

Spring 2013
01/14/2013 - 05/12/2013

Course Information

Section 001
Lecture
TTh 1:00PM - 3:40PM
RVSS 121
Alberto Quinonez
aquinone@austincc.edu
(512) 223.6407

Office Hours

  • M W
    1:30 p.m. - 4:00 p.m.
    RVS Office S107
    Other hours by appointment only:
    Friday 8:30am -12pm & 1:30pm 3pm

Course Requirements

Course Description:

An introductory course in microprocessor software and hardware: architecture, timing sequence, operation, and programming – and discussion of appropriate software diagnostic language and tools.

Course Prerequisites:

COSC 1315 & CETT 1425 Digital Fundamentals or departmental approval.

Required Textbook:

Microcontroller Theory and Applications: HC12 and S12 (2nd Ed.)

Daniel J. Pack; Pearson Publishing.

ISBN# 9780136152057

Required Materials:

1.      Flash Drive (at least 1 Gigabyte) – Quantity 1; Scientific Calculator

Course Rationale:

Microprocessor is the course used to provide an understanding of microprocessor hardware and software.  Technicians completing this course will work with microprocessor based equipment, and be capable of distinguishing hardware from software faults.  The superior students will also be capable of participating in product development efforts, including support and development of assembly language code.

Course Objectives/Outcomes:

Define terms applicable to microprocessor/microcomputer systems; program applications for microprocessor/microcomputer systems; write a program using Assembly Level Language; and describe the purpose of microprocessor internal registers.

Course Performance Measurements:

Participation                                  4 %     of final grade

Labs/Assignments                    16 %   of final grade

Group Project                              16 %   of final grade

Three Exams                               16 %   each of final grade (total 48 %)

Final Exam – Comprehensive 16%    of final grade

Readings

Required Textbook:

Microcontroller Theory and Applications: HC12 and S12 (2nd Ed.)

Daniel J. Pack; Pearson Publishing.

ISBN# 9780136152057

Topics

1.    Chapter 1

a.       Introduction to Microcontrollers

b.      HC12 & HC11

c.       Hardware Overview

d.      Software Instruction Set

2.      Programming Manual & other manuals (Blackboard-Handouts)

3.     JBUG Program

a.       JBUG manual (Blackboard)

4.      Chapter 2

a.       Assembly Language Basics

b.      Instruction Execution Cycle

c.       Instruction Sets

d.      Data transfer and manipulation

e.       Arithmetic Operations

f.       Addressing modes

5.    Chapter 3

a.       STACK – Basics

b.      Subroutine calls and Returns

c.       Branch Subroutines

6.      Chapter 5 – Interrupts

7.      Chapter 6 – Exceptions

8.       Applications and Other Topics

Course Subjects

1.                  Chapter 1

a.       Introduction to Microcontrollers

b.      HC12 & HC11

c.       Hardware Overview

d.      Software Instruction Set

2.                  Programming Manual & other manuals (Blackboard-Handouts)

3.                  JBUG Program

a.       JBUG manual (Blackboard)

4.                  Chapter 2

a.       Assembly Language Basics

b.      Instruction Execution Cycle

c.       Instruction Sets

d.      Data transfer and manipulation

e.       Arithmetic Operations

f.       Addressing modes

5.                  Chapter 3

a.       STACK – Basics

b.      Subroutine calls and Returns

c.       Branch Subroutines

6.                  Chapter 5 – Interrupts

7.                  Chapter 6 – Exceptions

Applications and Other Topics

Student Learning Outcomes/Learning Objectives

Student Learning Outcomes: Upon completing this course the student should:

a.       Be able to name the basic components of any computer system.

b.      Be able to explain the difference between von Neumann and Harvard architecture.

c.       Be able to write short programs using either op-codes or mnemonics.

d.      Be able to explain the difference between a low-level language and a high-level language.

e.       Be able to read a memory map.

f.       Be able to explain what an accumulator or a register is.

g.      Be able to explain what a stack is and how to identify what type it is.

h.      Be able to distinguish between SCI communications and SPI communications.

i.        Be able to explain how an external resource can be connected to the microprocessor using the address bus, data bus, and control bus.

 

SCANS Competencies

In 1990, the U.S. Department of Labor established the Secretary’s Commission on Achieving Necessary Skills (SCANS) to examine the demands of the workplace and whether our nation’s students are capable of meeting those demands. The Commission determined that today’s jobs generally require competencies in the following areas:

A.          Resources: Identifies, organizes, plans and allocates resources

B.          Interpersonal: Works with others

C.          Information: Acquires and uses information

D.          Systems: Understands complex interrelationships

E.           Technology: Works with a variety of technologies

 

The Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board requires that all degree plans in institutions of higher education incorporate these competencies and identify to the student how these competencies are achieved in course objectives.

This course incorporates the SCANS competencies in the following ways:

 

A.          Resources

B.          Interpersonal

C.          Information

D.          Systems

E.           Technology

F.           Basic Skills

G.          Thinking Skills

H.          Personal Qualities