Syllabus
United States History I

United States History I

HIST-1301

Summer 2013
07/08/2013 - 08/13/2013

Course Information

Section 032
Distance Learning
ONL SAC
Zoe VanSandt
vansandt@austincc.edu
(512) 223.9213

Office Hours

  • M T W
    9:30a.m. - 12:30p.m.
    SAC 1313.4
    Appointments outside of posted hours are available as needed.

Course Requirements

 

HIST 1301 - U. S. History I

 


This is your online syllabus. Read it completely in order to have the information you need for a successful semester. Once you read through this course description and study guide, and submit the Student Information Form, you will have completed the orientation for this class. 


COURSE DESCRIPTION: History 1301surveys American history from pre-Columbian era through the Civil War and Reconstruction. 
This section is a distance learning version of the standard United States History survey course. The student will be required to do the same amount of work and the same quality of work as students enrolling in the classroom equivalent of the course. This Distance Learning course is designed for mature and capable students endowed with a great degree of self-discipline and responsibility and knowledge of personal computers and the Internet. If this description does not sound like you, then you should consider dropping this section and adding a classroom section of the course. You WILL need maturity, ability, and self-discipline to successfully complete the requirements of any distance learning course! 
You are, for the most part, on your own. However, I am available via e-mail, phone, or personal visit. If you have questions about the course, don't hesitate to let me know! Here is the link for the Distance Learning office at ACC: http://dl.austincc.edu/.

COURSE RATIONALE: For complete information, go to the history department web site, which is accessible from my web page.

TEXT: Roark, James L. et al. The American Promise, 5th edition, volume 1. ISBN 978-0-312-66313-1

The 5th or 4th edition is on "in-library use only" reserve at some of the campus libraries, inlcuding my home campus, South Austin. The4th edition may also be available. 
NOTE: An online tutorial for the textbook is provided at the publisher's web site and I STRONGLY suggest you utilize this study tool. Chapter summaries and quizzes are available, and many students find these tools helpful. 
Click here to go to the web page. If you have difficulty with the web site, call the publisher's tech support. Their number is 1-800-936-6899.

COURSE OBJECTIVES: Learning objectives for this class in particular are found in the Study Guide, which you can access from my web page. This is what you need to use to study for the tests. Departmental objectives can be found at the departmental web site. Feel free to ask me questions if there is material you do not understand.

STUDENTS' ACC E-MAIL ACCOUNTS: All ACC students have a g.mail account. You need to check for mail here even if it is not your primary or preferred e-mail account. Any mass mailing I do will be to this g.mail address. For help with this contact the ACC Help Desk at 512-223-HELP or http://www.austincc.edu/helpdesk .

BLACKBOARD: I utilize Blackboard for the following tasks: posting announcements, sending class-wide e-mails, posting grades.

TESTING: There are five (5) multiple choice tests; each test has thirty (30) questions. Scantron answer sheets will be provided by the Testing Center. Tests must be taken at an ACC Testing Center; they are not taken via computer. In order to use any ACC Testing Center, you must present a valid ACC ID. The tests will be on file at the following campus testing centers: Riverside, Rio Grande, Northridge, Pinnacle, Cypress, Eastview, South Austin Campus, Round Rock Center, San Marcos Center, Fredericksburg Center. For complete Testing Center rules and regulations, go tohttp://www.austincc.edu/testctr
After you test or retest, the Testing Center will give you a "feedback" form with your score recorded on it. Keep this form! If, as very occasionally happens, your test is delayed in the intercampus mail, the "feedback" form is your proof that you completed the test at the appropriate time. DO NOT THROW AWAY ANY "FEEDBACK" FORM UNTIL YOU HAVE RECEIVED YOUR FINAL GRADE AT THE END OF THE SEMESTER!!!!!

RETESTING: You may retest any or all of the five tests. The higher grade is recorded; however, retest grades are capped at 80%. Retests must be taken within three (3) days following the date you take the initial test. The three days include Saturday and Sunday.

DEADLINES FOR TESTING:

Test #1: Thursday, July 11, 2013
Test #2: Thursday, July 18, 2013
Test #3: Thursday, July 25, 2013
Test #4: Thursday, August 1, 2013
Test #5: Thursday, August 8, 2013

You may take any or all tests early, but you may NOT take any tests before the official beginning of the first summer session, which is July8, 2013. 

SOME WORDS OF CAUTION WITH REGARD TO TESTING: 
1. Please be sure to mark the Testing Center "Student Test Request Form" for "Distance Learning." If you use the South Austin Campus Testing Center and fail to mark the request form correctly, you may receive my classroom test that is different from the test you are prepared to take. Please make sure that you take the distance learning test (30 multiple choice questions). 
2. Be aware that the Testing Centers (especially RVS, RGC and NRG) become exceptionally busy in the last few weeks of the semester. Therefore, you may have to wait an hour or MORE from the time you arrive before you can be seated and take the test. So please plan ahead. 
3. Please use your official name--as it appears on your ACC record--on the test scantrons and do not use nicknames or variations of your proper name. 

DETERMINATION OF GRADE: PLEASE READ THIS CAREFULLY.
For an A: There are two requirements to be met: 1) Test average of at least 80% AND 2) a formal research paper. (See information about the paper below.)

You MUST have a test average of at least 80 to meet the rquirements for an A. If you submit a paper and do NOT have at least an 80 average, the highest grade for which you are eligible is C. No exceptions.


For a B: There are two different ways to earn a B.
1) at least 80% on each and all of the five tests. Nothing else needs to be done.
OR
2) an overall test average of at least 80% AND a book review. (See information about the review below.)

You MUST have a test average of at least 80 to meet this second option for making a B. If you submit a book review and do NOT have at least an 80 average, the highest grade for which you are eligible is C. No exceptions.


For a C
Test average of at least 70%. No writing requirement.

 

Test average below 70% will result in either a D (test average 60-69%) or F (test average 59% and below).

FORMAL RESEARCH PAPER
**See paragraph below headed "Scholastic Dishonesty."** 
Rationale: This term paper provides an opportunity for the student to examine, in depth, one specific event, topic, or person in American History. It will enable you to research an area of interest to you, define a specific sub-area of particular interest for further research, and then present the results in a well-written term paper. 
General Requirements: 
1. The topic will have something to do with United States history up to 1877. Instructor approval of topic is required. Try to find a topic that you are interested in. For example, someone planning to become a teacher may want to research 19th century education reform. A student interested in literature might focus on an American writer. 
You get the idea. 
2. The paper will be approximately 1750 to 2000 words long. This translates into seven or eight double-spaced, typed pages. Exceptions to these limits must be approved by the instructor before the paper is submitted. 
3. The term paper must include at least THREE PRIMARY sources and FOUR SECONDARY sources. A primary source is something written by an individual who lived at the time and took part in the event that he or she is describing. Primary sources usually take the form of letters, diaries, journals, newspapers, government documents, and autobiographies. 
Secondary sources are books, articles, and scholarly documentaries produced at a later time, usually by historians who were not participants in the event. 
Electronic sources must be carefully evaluated for scholarly merit and may make up no more than 25% of your sources. Electronic databases are helpful in finding primary sources. Your textbook, other survey textbooks, and general encyclopedias (including Wikipedia) are NOT ACCEPTABLE SOURCES because they cannot go into great detail. No term paper will be accepted unless it contains the requisite number of primary and secondary sources that are properly documented. If you have any questions about a source, ask the instructor. 
You are required to use the MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers.
It is available in libraries and bookstores. This manual will instruct you on the correct way to format the paper, the Works Cited page, and internal documentation. It also has example pages of what the very first page of the paper and what the Works Cited page should look like. 
4. Austin has numerous libraries and depositories including The University of Texas General Libraries, the Benson Latin American Collection, the Barker Texas History Center, the Travis County Collection of the Austin Public Library, the Lyndon B. Johnson Presidential Library, and many others in addition to the resources available at ACC. 
5. This term paper will be graded "ACCEPTED" or "NOT ACCEPTED." If you submit your term paper before the deadline date in the syllabus and it is graded "NOT ACCEPTED," you may revise it and resubmit it prior to the deadline date. 
DATES TO KEEP IN MIND:

-- SUBMIT YOUR TOPIC TO ME VIA E-MAIL ON OR BEFORE WEDNESDAY, JULY 17, 2013. 
-- SUBMIT YOUR PAPER TO ME VIA E-MAIL ON OR BEFORE FRIDAY,AUGUST 9, 2013. 

BOOK REVIEW
**See paragraph below headed "Scholastic Dishonesty."** 
Rationale: Writing a book review helps exercise and enhance critical thinking skills. 
1. A book review is NOT a book report. A review contains an analysis of the author as well as a summary of content. The review will be 4-5 pages in length (typed, double-spaced) and contain the following three elements: a) summary of content; b) analysis of author's ability to demonstrate her or his thesis; c) insight gained from reading the book. 
2. The book must be chosen from the list provided in this syllabus. Let me know via e-mail what book you choose. Click here to go to the book list. 
3. The BOOK REVIEW will be graded "ACCEPTED" or "NOT ACCEPTED." If you submit your book review before the deadline date in the syllabus and it is graded "NOT ACCEPTED," you may revise it and resubmit it prior to the deadline date. 
DATES TO KEEP IN MIND:

-- SUBMIT YOUR BOOK CHOICE TO ME VIA E-MAIL ON OR BEFORE WEDNESDAY, JULY 17, 2013.
-- SUBMIT YOUR BOOK REVIEW TO ME VIA E-MAIL ON OR BEFORE FRIDAY,AUGUST 9, 2013.

SCHOLASTIC DISHONESTY: From the ACC Student Handbook: "Acts prohibited by the College for which discipline may be administered include scholastic dishonesty, including but not limited to cheating on an exam or quiz, plagiarizing, and unauthorized collaboration with another in preparing outside work. Academic work submitted by students shall be the result of their thought, research or self-expression. Academic work is defined as, but not limited to tests, quizzes, whether taken electronically or on paper; projects, either individual or group; classroom presentations, and homework."
If cheating or plagiarizing occurs, the penalty is an Ffor the course. 
Definition of 'to plagiarize': "to steal and pass off (the ideas or words of another) as one's own : use (another's production) without crediting the source" -- definition from Merriam-Webster athttp://mw1.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/plagiarizing.

COURSE CONTACTS: Part of the course requirement is that you contact me after the third and fifth tests. This ensures that we stay "on the same page" with regard to your progress. The contacts can be done by e-mail, phone, or personal visit. Most students fulfill this requirement via e-mail.

GRANTING OF INCOMPLETES: An Incomplete will be given only in the most extreme cases and only if you have successfully completed at least 50% of the course work and you have at least a C average at the time of the request. Once an Incomplete is recorded, it is your responsibility to finish the work within a specified amount of time; otherwise, the Incomplete automatically changes to an F on your transcript.

WITHDRAWING FROM THE COURSE: It is your responsibility to withdraw from the class if you cannot meet the requirements. I retain the right to initiate withdrawal based on lack of progress or as a disciplinary measure. The last day to withdraw is August 7, 2013.

STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES POLICY: From the ACC Student Handbook: "Each ACC campus offers support services for students with documented physical or psychological disabilities. Students with disabilities must request reasonable accommodations through the Office for Students with Disabilities on the campus where they expect to take the majority of their classes. Students are encouraged to do this three weeks before the start of the semester."

PRIVACY POLICY: The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act protects confidentiality of your educational records. Grades cannot be given over the phone, posted, over e-mail, or through a fellow student.

YOU ARE NOW READY TO PROCEED TO THE STUDY GUIDE
DON'T FORGET TO FILL OUT THE STUDENT 
INFORMATION FORM AT THE END OF THE STUDY GUIDE!

Readings

 

HIST 1301 - U. S. History I

 


This is your online syllabus. Read it completely in order to have the information you need for a successful semester. Once you read through this course description and study guide, and submit the Student Information Form, you will have completed the orientation for this class. 


COURSE DESCRIPTION: History 1301surveys American history from pre-Columbian era through the Civil War and Reconstruction. 
This section is a distance learning version of the standard United States History survey course. The student will be required to do the same amount of work and the same quality of work as students enrolling in the classroom equivalent of the course. This Distance Learning course is designed for mature and capable students endowed with a great degree of self-discipline and responsibility and knowledge of personal computers and the Internet. If this description does not sound like you, then you should consider dropping this section and adding a classroom section of the course. You WILL need maturity, ability, and self-discipline to successfully complete the requirements of any distance learning course! 
You are, for the most part, on your own. However, I am available via e-mail, phone, or personal visit. If you have questions about the course, don't hesitate to let me know! Here is the link for the Distance Learning office at ACC: http://dl.austincc.edu/.

COURSE RATIONALE: For complete information, go to the history department web site, which is accessible from my web page.

TEXT: Roark, James L. et al. The American Promise, 5th edition, volume 1. ISBN 978-0-312-66313-1

The 5th or 4th edition is on "in-library use only" reserve at some of the campus libraries, inlcuding my home campus, South Austin. The4th edition may also be available. 
NOTE: An online tutorial for the textbook is provided at the publisher's web site and I STRONGLY suggest you utilize this study tool. Chapter summaries and quizzes are available, and many students find these tools helpful. 
Click here to go to the web page. If you have difficulty with the web site, call the publisher's tech support. Their number is 1-800-936-6899.

COURSE OBJECTIVES: Learning objectives for this class in particular are found in the Study Guide, which you can access from my web page. This is what you need to use to study for the tests. Departmental objectives can be found at the departmental web site. Feel free to ask me questions if there is material you do not understand.

STUDENTS' ACC E-MAIL ACCOUNTS: All ACC students have a g.mail account. You need to check for mail here even if it is not your primary or preferred e-mail account. Any mass mailing I do will be to this g.mail address. For help with this contact the ACC Help Desk at 512-223-HELP or http://www.austincc.edu/helpdesk .

BLACKBOARD: I utilize Blackboard for the following tasks: posting announcements, sending class-wide e-mails, posting grades.

TESTING: There are five (5) multiple choice tests; each test has thirty (30) questions. Scantron answer sheets will be provided by the Testing Center. Tests must be taken at an ACC Testing Center; they are not taken via computer. In order to use any ACC Testing Center, you must present a valid ACC ID. The tests will be on file at the following campus testing centers: Riverside, Rio Grande, Northridge, Pinnacle, Cypress, Eastview, South Austin Campus, Round Rock Center, San Marcos Center, Fredericksburg Center. For complete Testing Center rules and regulations, go tohttp://www.austincc.edu/testctr
After you test or retest, the Testing Center will give you a "feedback" form with your score recorded on it. Keep this form! If, as very occasionally happens, your test is delayed in the intercampus mail, the "feedback" form is your proof that you completed the test at the appropriate time. DO NOT THROW AWAY ANY "FEEDBACK" FORM UNTIL YOU HAVE RECEIVED YOUR FINAL GRADE AT THE END OF THE SEMESTER!!!!!

RETESTING: You may retest any or all of the five tests. The higher grade is recorded; however, retest grades are capped at 80%. Retests must be taken within three (3) days following the date you take the initial test. The three days include Saturday and Sunday.

DEADLINES FOR TESTING:

Test #1: Thursday, July 11, 2013
Test #2: Thursday, July 18, 2013
Test #3: Thursday, July 25, 2013
Test #4: Thursday, August 1, 2013
Test #5: Thursday, August 8, 2013

You may take any or all tests early, but you may NOT take any tests before the official beginning of the first summer session, which is July8, 2013. 

SOME WORDS OF CAUTION WITH REGARD TO TESTING: 
1. Please be sure to mark the Testing Center "Student Test Request Form" for "Distance Learning." If you use the South Austin Campus Testing Center and fail to mark the request form correctly, you may receive my classroom test that is different from the test you are prepared to take. Please make sure that you take the distance learning test (30 multiple choice questions). 
2. Be aware that the Testing Centers (especially RVS, RGC and NRG) become exceptionally busy in the last few weeks of the semester. Therefore, you may have to wait an hour or MORE from the time you arrive before you can be seated and take the test. So please plan ahead. 
3. Please use your official name--as it appears on your ACC record--on the test scantrons and do not use nicknames or variations of your proper name. 

DETERMINATION OF GRADE: PLEASE READ THIS CAREFULLY.
For an A: There are two requirements to be met: 1) Test average of at least 80% AND 2) a formal research paper. (See information about the paper below.)

You MUST have a test average of at least 80 to meet the rquirements for an A. If you submit a paper and do NOT have at least an 80 average, the highest grade for which you are eligible is C. No exceptions.


For a B: There are two different ways to earn a B.
1) at least 80% on each and all of the five tests. Nothing else needs to be done.
OR
2) an overall test average of at least 80% AND a book review. (See information about the review below.)

You MUST have a test average of at least 80 to meet this second option for making a B. If you submit a book review and do NOT have at least an 80 average, the highest grade for which you are eligible is C. No exceptions.


For a C
Test average of at least 70%. No writing requirement.

 

Test average below 70% will result in either a D (test average 60-69%) or F (test average 59% and below).

FORMAL RESEARCH PAPER
**See paragraph below headed "Scholastic Dishonesty."** 
Rationale: This term paper provides an opportunity for the student to examine, in depth, one specific event, topic, or person in American History. It will enable you to research an area of interest to you, define a specific sub-area of particular interest for further research, and then present the results in a well-written term paper. 
General Requirements: 
1. The topic will have something to do with United States history up to 1877. Instructor approval of topic is required. Try to find a topic that you are interested in. For example, someone planning to become a teacher may want to research 19th century education reform. A student interested in literature might focus on an American writer. 
You get the idea. 
2. The paper will be approximately 1750 to 2000 words long. This translates into seven or eight double-spaced, typed pages. Exceptions to these limits must be approved by the instructor before the paper is submitted. 
3. The term paper must include at least THREE PRIMARY sources and FOUR SECONDARY sources. A primary source is something written by an individual who lived at the time and took part in the event that he or she is describing. Primary sources usually take the form of letters, diaries, journals, newspapers, government documents, and autobiographies. 
Secondary sources are books, articles, and scholarly documentaries produced at a later time, usually by historians who were not participants in the event. 
Electronic sources must be carefully evaluated for scholarly merit and may make up no more than 25% of your sources. Electronic databases are helpful in finding primary sources. Your textbook, other survey textbooks, and general encyclopedias (including Wikipedia) are NOT ACCEPTABLE SOURCES because they cannot go into great detail. No term paper will be accepted unless it contains the requisite number of primary and secondary sources that are properly documented. If you have any questions about a source, ask the instructor. 
You are required to use the MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers.
It is available in libraries and bookstores. This manual will instruct you on the correct way to format the paper, the Works Cited page, and internal documentation. It also has example pages of what the very first page of the paper and what the Works Cited page should look like. 
4. Austin has numerous libraries and depositories including The University of Texas General Libraries, the Benson Latin American Collection, the Barker Texas History Center, the Travis County Collection of the Austin Public Library, the Lyndon B. Johnson Presidential Library, and many others in addition to the resources available at ACC. 
5. This term paper will be graded "ACCEPTED" or "NOT ACCEPTED." If you submit your term paper before the deadline date in the syllabus and it is graded "NOT ACCEPTED," you may revise it and resubmit it prior to the deadline date. 
DATES TO KEEP IN MIND:

-- SUBMIT YOUR TOPIC TO ME VIA E-MAIL ON OR BEFORE WEDNESDAY, JULY 17, 2013. 
-- SUBMIT YOUR PAPER TO ME VIA E-MAIL ON OR BEFORE FRIDAY,AUGUST 9, 2013. 

BOOK REVIEW
**See paragraph below headed "Scholastic Dishonesty."** 
Rationale: Writing a book review helps exercise and enhance critical thinking skills. 
1. A book review is NOT a book report. A review contains an analysis of the author as well as a summary of content. The review will be 4-5 pages in length (typed, double-spaced) and contain the following three elements: a) summary of content; b) analysis of author's ability to demonstrate her or his thesis; c) insight gained from reading the book. 
2. The book must be chosen from the list provided in this syllabus. Let me know via e-mail what book you choose. Click here to go to the book list. 
3. The BOOK REVIEW will be graded "ACCEPTED" or "NOT ACCEPTED." If you submit your book review before the deadline date in the syllabus and it is graded "NOT ACCEPTED," you may revise it and resubmit it prior to the deadline date. 
DATES TO KEEP IN MIND:

-- SUBMIT YOUR BOOK CHOICE TO ME VIA E-MAIL ON OR BEFORE WEDNESDAY, JULY 17, 2013.
-- SUBMIT YOUR BOOK REVIEW TO ME VIA E-MAIL ON OR BEFORE FRIDAY,AUGUST 9, 2013.

SCHOLASTIC DISHONESTY: From the ACC Student Handbook: "Acts prohibited by the College for which discipline may be administered include scholastic dishonesty, including but not limited to cheating on an exam or quiz, plagiarizing, and unauthorized collaboration with another in preparing outside work. Academic work submitted by students shall be the result of their thought, research or self-expression. Academic work is defined as, but not limited to tests, quizzes, whether taken electronically or on paper; projects, either individual or group; classroom presentations, and homework."
If cheating or plagiarizing occurs, the penalty is an Ffor the course. 
Definition of 'to plagiarize': "to steal and pass off (the ideas or words of another) as one's own : use (another's production) without crediting the source" -- definition from Merriam-Webster athttp://mw1.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/plagiarizing.

COURSE CONTACTS: Part of the course requirement is that you contact me after the third and fifth tests. This ensures that we stay "on the same page" with regard to your progress. The contacts can be done by e-mail, phone, or personal visit. Most students fulfill this requirement via e-mail.

GRANTING OF INCOMPLETES: An Incomplete will be given only in the most extreme cases and only if you have successfully completed at least 50% of the course work and you have at least a C average at the time of the request. Once an Incomplete is recorded, it is your responsibility to finish the work within a specified amount of time; otherwise, the Incomplete automatically changes to an F on your transcript.

WITHDRAWING FROM THE COURSE: It is your responsibility to withdraw from the class if you cannot meet the requirements. I retain the right to initiate withdrawal based on lack of progress or as a disciplinary measure. The last day to withdraw is August 7, 2013.

STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES POLICY: From the ACC Student Handbook: "Each ACC campus offers support services for students with documented physical or psychological disabilities. Students with disabilities must request reasonable accommodations through the Office for Students with Disabilities on the campus where they expect to take the majority of their classes. Students are encouraged to do this three weeks before the start of the semester."

PRIVACY POLICY: The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act protects confidentiality of your educational records. Grades cannot be given over the phone, posted, over e-mail, or through a fellow student.

YOU ARE NOW READY TO PROCEED TO THE STUDY GUIDE
DON'T FORGET TO FILL OUT THE STUDENT 
INFORMATION FORM AT THE END OF THE STUDY GUIDE!

STUDY GUIDE


Answering these questions will prepare you for the tests. 

NOTE: An online tutorial for the textbook is provided at the publisher's web site and I STRONGLY suggest you utilize this study tool. Chapter summaries and quizzes are available, and many students find this helpful. 
Click here to go to the web page. If you have difficulty with the web site, call the publisher's tech support. Their number is 1-800-936-6899.

 

Test #1


The first test is a map test. You will be asked to identify via a mutliple choice format: twenty (20) of the forty-eight (48) contiguous states; the five Great Lakes; five major rivers. A map like the one below will be used.
There are many maps in the textbook or online that will help you.

 


 

 

 

Page numbers are referenced to the 5th edition of The American Promise.

Test #2 (Chapters 1 - 4)


Chapter 1: "Ancient America: Before 1492"

1.What distinguishes the study of humans by archeaeologists from the study of humans by historians? p. 5

2. What kind of information do archaeologists use to understand ancient peoples?p. 5

3.What is the connection between the "Wisconsin glaciation period" and the Beringia land bridge? p. 7-8

4. How long did it take Paleo-Indians to complete their expansion to the southern tip of South American after they first migrated to the Western Hemisphere? p. 10

5.What do Paleo-Indian artifacts indicate about hunting practices for those people? p. 10

6.What does the term Archaic describe with regard to ancient peoples' lifestyles? p. 11

7. What archaeological find in Folsom, New Mexico, indicated that hunters and giant bison lived simultaneously? p. 11

8.How did the culture of Woodland peoples change circa 4000BP (before present era)? p. 15

9.Why did southwestern Archaic peoples adopt agriculture? p. 16

10. What commodity was necessary for southwestern peoples to know how to conserve? p. 16

11. Why do archaeologists believe mound builders were organized into chiefdoms? p. 19

12. What three groups represented the Eastern Woodland peoples at the time of Columbus's arrival in 1492? p. 21-2

13. What was the purpose of the League of Five Nations? p. 21-2

14. What socioeconomic class benefited from the Mexica tribute system of wealth redistribution? p. 25

 

Chapter 2: "Europeans Encounter the New World, 1492-1600"

1. Why did exploration and expansion become popular with European monarchs in the fifteenth century? p. 34

2. What role did the Bubonic Plague have in European desires for exploration? p. 34

3. How did the establishment of a sea route to Asia affect the market for Far Eastern goods in Europe? p. 34-5

4. What was the source of labor for Portuguese plantations in the Cape Verde islands? p. 35

5. What native peoples did Columbus first encounter? p. 36-7

6. What were the provisions of the Treaty of Tordesillas? p. 37

7. What does the term "Columbian exchange" mean? p. 39

8. Why was Magellan's circumnavigation of the world significant? p. 39

9. What did Spaniard's assumption about their own superiority mean for Indians with regard to coerced labor? p. 46

10. What was the purpose of "encomienda" in Spanish colonies? p. 46

11. What was the purpose of the "repartimiento" issued in 1549 by the Spanish government?p. 49

12. What was the central issue of Martin Luther's Protestant Reformation? p. 54

13. Who sponsored the explorer Martin Frobisher in the 1570s and what was he hoping to achieve? p. 55-6

 

Chapter 3: "The Southern Colonies in the Seventeenth Century, 1601-1700"

1. When James I of England granted land to the Virginia Company for the establishment of a colony, were prior land claims of native peoples and Spanish settlers honored? p. 63-4

2. How successful were early English attempts to sustain North American settlements? p. 65

3. How did Powhatan help the early Jamestown settlers? p. 65

4. What was the socioeconomic background of early Jamestown settlers? p. 65

5. How did the English colonists differ from Spanish colonists with regard to converting Indians to Christianity? p. 65

6. For whom could Virginia's inabitants vote under the rules of the royal government? p. 67

7. How did the "headright" system of immigration work? p. 69

8. What was the biggest obstacle to profitfor tobacco farmers in 1600s Virginia? p. 69-70

9. What was indentured servitude? How were indentured women treated differently than indentured men? p. 70-3

10. How did Chesapeake servants differ from servants in England? p. 73

11. What was the relationship between Catholics and Protestants in Maryland? p. 76

12. What does the term "yeoman planter" mean? p. 77

13. What were the issues of Bacon's Rebellion? What two groups were at odds with each other? p. 79-81

14. Why did the southern colonies shift from reliance on indentured servant labor to African slave labor? p. 81

15.What was the status of Spanish outposts in New Mexico and Florida by the end of the seventeenth century? p. 81-2

16. How did the Indian leader Pope respond to Spanish exploitation of his people in 1680? p. 82-3

17. How did slavery in the Chesapeake compare to slavery in Barbados? p. 85

 

Chapter 4: "The Northern Colonies in the Seventeenth Century, 1601-1700"

1. To what did New England Puritanism owe its roots? p. 93

2. What was unique about the Massachusetts Bay Company charter? p. 95

3. Why was Anne Hutchinson controversial? p. 102-3

4. How did the Boston church punish Anne Hutchinson? p. 102-3

5. What allowed New England's population to grow during the seventeenth century? p. 104

6. What was central to the belief of Quakers? p. 105

7. What European nation controlled New Netherland during most of the seventeenth century? p. 109

8. Why did the English allow religious toleration in the colony of New York? p. 110

9. Why did Charles II make the gift of a colony to William Penn? p. 111

10. What was the official Indian policy in colonial Pennsylvania? p. 112

11. What was the purpose of the Navigation Acts and how did they affect colonical commerce? p. 112

12. What characterized the commerical relationship between the colonies and England by the end of the 1600s? p. 113

13. What was the cause of f King Philip's War and what was its legacy for English settlers? p. 114

 

 

Test #3 (Chapters 5 -8)

Chapter 5: "Colonial America in the Eighteenth Century, 1701-1770"

1. How did colonial population change during the eighteenth century? p. 125

2. What caused the New England colonies to experience less growth than other colonies? p. 126

3. What was unique about the colonial standard of living in the eighteenth century? p. 126

4. What did the New England policy of "partible inheritance" mean? p. 127

5. How did the lives of the least wealthy in New England compare with the poor in England? p. 128

6. Why was slavery not as prevalent in New England colonies as in other colonies? p. 128

7. What group made up the largest number of immigrants to the middle colonies? p. 129

8. Why did the middle colonies have a smaller slave population than colonies in the south? p. 132

9. What Pennsylvania policy promoted settlement of that colony and led to reduced clashes with Indians? p. 133

10. How did the publication Poor Richard's Almanack reflect the beliefs of the typical Pennsylvania colonist? p. 135

11. Why did southern planters prefer to purchase newly arrived African slaves in small groups? p. 137-8

12. In addition to natural increase, what played a significant role in increasing the Southern slave population during the second half of the eighteenth century? p. 139

13. How did newly arrived African slaves develop kinship relations within existing communities of slaves? p. 139-40

14. What common experience characterized the otherwise distinct three regions of British North America? p. 141-2

15. What were the major characteristics of the Great Awakening? p. 145

16. Why did English colonial governors lack the trust of colonists? p. 149

 

Chapter 6: "The British Empire and the Colonial Crisis, 1754-1775"

1. What was the primary cause of the Seven Years' War? p. 159

2. How were Indians affected by the outcome of the Seven Years' War? p. 165-6

3. Why did George Grenville claim American colonists had "virtual representation" in the British Parliament? p. 169

4. How did the Stamp Act and Sugar Act affect colonists differently? p. 169

5. What was the central argument of the Virgina Resolves as outlined by PatrickHenry? p. 169

6. What did colonists learn from the Sons of Liberty about the effectiveness of public demonstrations? p. 170

7. What was the general colonial response to the Townshend Duties? p. 174

8. How did the Daughters of Liberty protest the Townshend Duties? p. 175-6

9. What was the Boston Massacre? p. 177-8

10. What was the purpose of the Tea Act, according to the British government? p. 179

11. What did the First Continental Congress declare with regard to Parliament's right to tax the colonies and regulate their trade? p. 182

12. Who fired the first shot at Lexington, Massachusetts? p. 184

13. What was the message of Lord Dunmore's Proclamation? p. 184-5

14. Who was Phyllis Wheatley and what were her accomplishments? p. 185

 

Chapter 7: "The War for America, 1775-1783"

1. What was the initial goal of the Second Continental Congress? p. 193

2. Why was the Second Continental Congress hesitant to break completely with Britain when it met in 1775? p. 193

3. Who wrote Common Sense and what was its message? p. 195-6

4. What obstacles faced the British army during the Revolutionary War? p. 198

5. Where did the British concentrate their troops by the end of 1776? p. 202

6. What challenges did General Washington face with regard to manpower within the Continental army? p. 198-9

7. How did Native Americans react to the war? p. 204

8. What happened to the valuation of money after the Continental Congress deicded to issue paper money? p. 210

9. How did the Continental Congress pay soldiers serving in the Continental army in the wake of depreciated currency? p. 210

10. How was a treasonable act punished by the American government? p. 205; 208

11. What was France's motivation in allying itself with the United States after the battle of Saratoga? p. 214

12. What was army morale low during the winter of 1777-78? p. 212

13. How did the French help the Americans win at Yorktown in 1781? p. 218-9

14. What did the Treat of Paris, ending the Revolutionary War, mean for Indians? p. 222

 

Chapter 8: "Building a Republic, 1775-1789"

1. What did the various state constitutions have in common with regard to separation of powers in state government? p. 232

2. Why did most states spell out rights and liberties within their state constitutions? p. 232

3. What was unusual about how Massachusetts slave Elizabeth Freeman achieved her freedom in 1781? p. 234

4. How did General Washington neutralize the Newburgh Conspiracy? p. 238

5. What did Congress accomplish with the land ordinances of 1784 and 1785? p. 240-1

6. What prevented continued American settlement in the Northwest Territory? p. 241

7. What did the Northwest Ordinance of 1787 say about slavery? p. 242

8. What is the connection between Shays' Rebellion and the decision to overhaul the Articles of Confederation? p. 244

9.How did delegates to the1787 Constitutional Convention view the Articles of Confederation? p. 246

10. Why did small population states object to the Vriginia Plan as presented at the beginning of the Constitutional Convention? p. 247

11. How did the convention delegates decide to count slaves when determining apportionment of representatives? p. 247

12. What mechanism did the delegates come up with to choose the president? p. 248

13. Which three populous states opposed the 1787 Constitution? p. 248

14. . What is the definition of "federalist" and "anti-federalist" with regard to support of the new constitution? p. 248-251

15. Why did James Madison describe--in Federalist #10--representative government as the "republican remedy" to the problem of faction? p. 254

 

 

Test #4 (Chapters 9 -12)

Chapter 9: "The New Nation Takes Form, 1789-1800"

1. How did different viewpoints about Britain and France help create the rift between Thomas Jefferson and Alexander Hamilton? p. 260

2. How did George Washington conduct himself once he became president? p. 261

3. What promise with regard to ratification of the Constitution was redeemed with the creation of the Bill of Rights by the first Congress? p. 264

4. What is the issue in the eighth and ninth amendments to the Constitution? p. 264

5. Acccording to republican ideals, what was the primary role for women in early America? p. 264-5

6. Why did Secretary of Treasury Hamilton adovcate replacing old certificates of debt with new government bonds? p. 266

7. Why did Secretary of Treasury Hamilton adovcatefederal assumption of the individual states' old Revolutionary Wary debt? p. 266-7

8. What caused the Whiskey Rebellion and how did the federal government respond to it? p. 269

9. What was the policy of the American government toward Indians in the Northwest Territory? p. 272

10. What clash with Indians in the Northwest Territory led to the Treaty of Grenville? p. 273-4

11. Why was the Jay Treaty not supported by many Americans? p. 276

12. By the late 1790s, what foreign nation tended to have the support of the Republican party? p. 279

13. Who won the presidency and vice-presidency in 1796? p. 279-80

14. What was the "XYZ Affair"? p. 280

15. What was the purpose of the 1798 Sedition Act? 281-2

16. What opinion of party politics did Thomas Jefferson suggest in his inaugural address? p. 285

 

Chapter 10: "Republicans in Power, 1800-1824"

1. What did Thomas Jefferson mean when he called his election to the presidency the "revolution of 1800"? p. 291

2. What was the purpose of the 1801 "midnight judges" appointments by out-going president John Adams? p. 293

3. What was the lasting significance of the Supreme Court case Marbury v. Madison? p. 293

4. Why was the United States concerned when Spain returned control of Louisiana to France? p. 295

5. What was the result of Robert Livingston's negotiations with France for the purchase of the city of New Orleans? p. 295-6

6. What was the government's response to the sinking of the ship Chesapeake in 1807? p. 300

7. From what part of the United States did the "War Hawk" congressmen come? p. 303

8. Why did congressmen from New England and some Middle Atlantic colonies oppose declaring war on Britain in 1812? p. 303

9. How did state legislatures react to the opportunity to rewrite laws of domestic relations during the early years of the United States? p. 306

10. Why were slave marriages not governed by the same unequal power relationship characteristic of white marriage? p. 306

11. For what career did female seminaries (academies) prepare women? p. 307-8

12. What political alliances were made in the House of Representatives to ensure passage of the Missouri Compromise of 1820? p. 312

13. How did the lack of multiple political parties complicate the presidential election of 1824? p. 314-5

14. What was Henry Clay's "American System"? p. 315

15. In what area did President John Quincy Adams consider himself to be continuing the work of previous presidents Jefferson and Madison?' p. 316

 

Chapter 11: "The Expanding Republic, 1815-1840"

1. Why were canals important to the national economy? p. 324

2. Why were wages low for Massachusetts mill workers? p. 326-7

3. What role did bankers have in the economy of the nation during the Jackson Era? 327

4. What belief about self-determination was a hallmark of the Jacksonian Era? p. 330-1

5. How did political leaders feel about party politics after 1828? p. 331

6. Why did the numbers of voters increase between 1824 and 1828? p. 331

7. What was the Trail of Tears? p. 334

8. What argument about nullification was made by John Calhoun in response to the Tariff of Abominations? p. 337

9. How did church membership change during the first decades of the 1800s? p. 342

10. What state banned the manufacture and sale of alcoholic beverages in 1851? p. 343

11. Who was William Lloyd Garrison and what did he advocate in his newspaper? p. 345

12. What obstacles did female abolitionist lecturers face that their male counterparts did not? p. 346

13. Why was Martin Van Buren known as "The Little Magician" in political circles? p. 347

14. On what did Whigs blame the Panic of 1837? p. 350-1

 

Chapter 12: "The New West and Free North, 1840-1860"

2. What four fundamental changes in American society fueled the phenomenal economic growthhe growth of the 1840s-50s? p. 359

3. What arguments were made in favor of "free-labor" by people in the north and west? p. 364

4. What did John O'Sullivan mean by the term "manifest destiny"? p. 370

5. How did the U.S. and Britain resolve their competing claims to the Oregon country? p. 370

6.How did Mormons in Utah adapt to the dry climate? p. 374

7. What sort of people migrated to Texas with Stephen Austin in the 1820s? p. 375

8. What event secured Texas's independence from Mexico? p. 376

9. How did President John Tyler secure approval for the annexation of Texas? p. 378

10. How did the U.S. acquire what is now the southwestern states? p. 378-381

11. What were the terms of the 1848 Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo? p. 381

12. Why did massive numbers of immigrants go to California during late 1840s?p. 382

13. What did New England transcendentalists believe? p. 385

14. What beliefs were advocated at the 1848 Seneca Falls women's rights convention? p. 386-7

15. How did abolitionists make their issue more attractive to white northerners? p. 387

16. By 1855, what was the most notable success to date for African-Americans in New England? p. 388

 

Test #5 (Chapters 13 -16)

Chapter 13: "The Slave South, 1820-1860"

1. What role did westward expansion of cotton production have on increasing southern political power? p. 395

2. What percentage of world cotton supplies came from the American south by 1860? p. 395

4. How did slavery contribute ti race consencus amongst whites in the South? p. 396-7

3. Why did newly arrived European immigrants settle in the North instead of the South? p. 403

5. What did plantation owners mean by the term "paternalism"? p. 404

7. How did southern men's emphasis on chivalry affect southern law? p. 408

6. What issue did the diarist Mary Chestnut Boykin expose as being of great concern to planter class women? p. 409

8. What tasks were assigned to elderly male slaves? p. 411

9. What was an advantage of being a house servant instead of a field hand? p. 411

10. What was the most common way for slaves to protest their bondage? p. 414

11. To what did most yeoman farmers aspire in the old South? p. 416

12. In what respect did yeoman farmers depend on the planter class? p. 416

14. What educational opportunities were available for free blacks in the antebellum South? p. 419

13. By the 1850s, who was eligible to vote in the Southern states? p. 420

 

Chapter 14: "The House Divided, 1846-1861"

1. What was proposed by the 1846 Wilmot Proviso? p. 430

2. What was the meaning of "popular sovereignty" as understood by Senator Lewis Cass? p. 430

3. What was the issue that led to the Compromise of 1850? p. 432-4

4. What were the provisions of the Fugitive Slave Act that was part of the Compromise of 1850? p. 434

5. What was Stephen Douglas's purpose in repealing the Missouri Compromise in the Kansas-Nebraska Act? p. 437

6. What effect did the 1854 Kansas-Nebraska Act have on political party formation? p. 438

7. Around what issue did northern Republicans rally in 1854? p. 440

8. What did the presidential election of 1856 reveal about the relative strengths/weaknesses of the Democractic and Republican parties? p. 443-4

9. What were the proponents of the 1857 Dred Scott Supreme Court decision? p. 448

10. How did Abraham Lincoln's views on the extension of slavery influence his search for a political party home in the mid-1850s? p. 449

11. How did the Lincoln-Douglas debates help inrease Abraham Lincoln's national profile? p. 451

12. What happened to John Brown after his raid on Harpers Ferry, Virginia? p. 451

13. What factors led to Abraham Lincoln being chosen as the Republican presidential candidate in 1860? p. 453

14. Why did slave states in the Upper South initially resist secession? p. 455

15. How did out-going President James Buchanan respond to secession of the southern states? p. 455-6

16. How did Lincoln address the crisis in his inaugural address? p. 456

 

 

Chapter 15: "The Crucible of War, 1861-1865"

1. What events marked the official beginning of the Civil War? p. 463-4

2. What was the situation in the border states of Missouri and Kentucky? p. 464

3. Why did white Southerners from all classes enlist to fight against the north? p. 465

4. How did most Northerners view secession? p. 465

5. What was "King Cotton diplomacy" and why did it fail? p. 466

6. What was the status of the war in the eastern theater at the end of 1862? p. 470

7. How did General Ulysses Grant create a sophisticated war machine? p. 471

8. What was Lincoln's motivation for issuing the Emancipation Proclamation? p. 476-7

9. How did free black men of fighting age in the North respond to the outbreak of war? p. 478

10. What was the "twenty-Negro law" in the South? p. 481-2

11. What caused the standard of living to fall for the working class in the North during the war? p. 484

12. What was the result of the Battle of Vicksburg in 1863? p. 486

13. In what state did General William T. Sherman initially employ his scorched-earth campaign? p. 491

14. What factors contributed to the demoralization of Confederate troops by the last months of the war? p. 493

15. What terms did General Grant offer to General Lee at Appomattox Court House in April of 1865? 493

 

Chapter 16: "Reconstruction, 1863-1877"

1. Under Lincoln's plan for reconstructions, what was required of a Confederate state before it was readmitted to the Union? p. 501

2. Why were pardons to former Confederate soldiers under Lincoln's Proclamation of Amnesty and Reconstruction important? p. 501

3. What effect did the policies of the Freeman's Bureau and "Sherman land" have on the aspirations of former slaves? p. 503

4. Why did President Andrew Johnson's plan for reconstruction shock reformers? 508

5. What was the purpose of southern states' "black codes"? p. 508

6. How did moderate and radical Republicans differ in 1865 with regard to black suffrage and black land ownership? p. 509-10

7. What was the outcome of President Johnson's attempt to unite opponents to the fourteenth amendment? p. 511

8. What are the three reconstruction era constitutional amendments and how were blacks affected by each of them? p. 514

9. How did the passage of the fifteenth amendment shape future Republican Party policy with regard to black civil rights? p. 515

10. How did the Ku Klux Klan begin and develop? p. 518

11. What happened to most sharecroppers once they borrowed goods on a crop lien? p. 523

12. Who were southern "redeemers"? p. 526-7

13. What characterized Supreme Court decisions in the years following the Civil War? p. 526

14. What characterized the Compromise of 1877? p. 529

 

 

Here are a few sample test questions:

How did the English monarchs James I and Charles I react to the ideas of Puritan reformers?

A) Both monarchs embraced strict Catholicism.

B) Both worked with Parliament to ease religious tensions.

C) Both struggled to implement Protestant reforms.

D) Both enforced conformity to the Church of England.

Penny press newspapers became popular with American readers in the 1830s by featuring
A) sophisticated analysis of political issues. 
B) highbrow literature in serialized form. 
C) breezy political coverage, irreverent editorials on current events, and crime reporting. 
D) all of the above.

In the Lower South in 1860, 
A) blacks outnumbered whites in all states. 
B) whites outnumbered blacks in all states. 
C) the numbers of whites and blacks were almost equal in number. 
D) there were about as many blacks as there were in the North.

 

KEEP READING!!!!
Following is the student information form which you need to cut-and-paste to an e-mail, fill out, and send to me at the e-mail address given on my web page. Completion and submission of this form meets the requirement for course orientation. This information enables me to help you better.


STUDENT INFORMATION FORM 
HIST 1301 - U. S. History I

NAME (AS IT APPEARS ON YOUR ACC RECORD):

STUDENT ID#:

E-MAIL ADDRESS:

POSTAL MAILING ADDRESS:

TELEPHONE NUMBERS: 
Home: 
Work: 
Cell: 
Preferred number to call:

BEST TIME TO CALL:

IS THIS YOUR FIRST DISTANCE LEARNING COURSE?

FOR HOW MANY HOURS ARE YOU ENROLLED THIS SEMESTER?

WHAT COLLEGE OR UNIVERSITY DO YOU NORMALLY ATTEND?

COMMENTS:

Course Subjects

 

HIST 1301 - U. S. History I

 


This is your online syllabus. Read it completely in order to have the information you need for a successful semester. Once you read through this course description and study guide, and submit the Student Information Form, you will have completed the orientation for this class. 


COURSE DESCRIPTION: History 1301surveys American history from pre-Columbian era through the Civil War and Reconstruction. 
This section is a distance learning version of the standard United States History survey course. The student will be required to do the same amount of work and the same quality of work as students enrolling in the classroom equivalent of the course. This Distance Learning course is designed for mature and capable students endowed with a great degree of self-discipline and responsibility and knowledge of personal computers and the Internet. If this description does not sound like you, then you should consider dropping this section and adding a classroom section of the course. You WILL need maturity, ability, and self-discipline to successfully complete the requirements of any distance learning course! 
You are, for the most part, on your own. However, I am available via e-mail, phone, or personal visit. If you have questions about the course, don't hesitate to let me know! Here is the link for the Distance Learning office at ACC: http://dl.austincc.edu/.

COURSE RATIONALE: For complete information, go to the history department web site, which is accessible from my web page.

TEXT: Roark, James L. et al. The American Promise, 5th edition, volume 1. ISBN 978-0-312-66313-1

The 5th or 4th edition is on "in-library use only" reserve at some of the campus libraries, inlcuding my home campus, South Austin. The4th edition may also be available. 
NOTE: An online tutorial for the textbook is provided at the publisher's web site and I STRONGLY suggest you utilize this study tool. Chapter summaries and quizzes are available, and many students find these tools helpful. 
Click here to go to the web page. If you have difficulty with the web site, call the publisher's tech support. Their number is 1-800-936-6899.

COURSE OBJECTIVES: Learning objectives for this class in particular are found in the Study Guide, which you can access from my web page. This is what you need to use to study for the tests. Departmental objectives can be found at the departmental web site. Feel free to ask me questions if there is material you do not understand.

STUDENTS' ACC E-MAIL ACCOUNTS: All ACC students have a g.mail account. You need to check for mail here even if it is not your primary or preferred e-mail account. Any mass mailing I do will be to this g.mail address. For help with this contact the ACC Help Desk at 512-223-HELP or http://www.austincc.edu/helpdesk .

BLACKBOARD: I utilize Blackboard for the following tasks: posting announcements, sending class-wide e-mails, posting grades.

TESTING: There are five (5) multiple choice tests; each test has thirty (30) questions. Scantron answer sheets will be provided by the Testing Center. Tests must be taken at an ACC Testing Center; they are not taken via computer. In order to use any ACC Testing Center, you must present a valid ACC ID. The tests will be on file at the following campus testing centers: Riverside, Rio Grande, Northridge, Pinnacle, Cypress, Eastview, South Austin Campus, Round Rock Center, San Marcos Center, Fredericksburg Center. For complete Testing Center rules and regulations, go tohttp://www.austincc.edu/testctr
After you test or retest, the Testing Center will give you a "feedback" form with your score recorded on it. Keep this form! If, as very occasionally happens, your test is delayed in the intercampus mail, the "feedback" form is your proof that you completed the test at the appropriate time. DO NOT THROW AWAY ANY "FEEDBACK" FORM UNTIL YOU HAVE RECEIVED YOUR FINAL GRADE AT THE END OF THE SEMESTER!!!!!

RETESTING: You may retest any or all of the five tests. The higher grade is recorded; however, retest grades are capped at 80%. Retests must be taken within three (3) days following the date you take the initial test. The three days include Saturday and Sunday.

DEADLINES FOR TESTING:

Test #1: Thursday, July 11, 2013
Test #2: Thursday, July 18, 2013
Test #3: Thursday, July 25, 2013
Test #4: Thursday, August 1, 2013
Test #5: Thursday, August 8, 2013

You may take any or all tests early, but you may NOT take any tests before the official beginning of the first summer session, which is July8, 2013. 

SOME WORDS OF CAUTION WITH REGARD TO TESTING: 
1. Please be sure to mark the Testing Center "Student Test Request Form" for "Distance Learning." If you use the South Austin Campus Testing Center and fail to mark the request form correctly, you may receive my classroom test that is different from the test you are prepared to take. Please make sure that you take the distance learning test (30 multiple choice questions). 
2. Be aware that the Testing Centers (especially RVS, RGC and NRG) become exceptionally busy in the last few weeks of the semester. Therefore, you may have to wait an hour or MORE from the time you arrive before you can be seated and take the test. So please plan ahead. 
3. Please use your official name--as it appears on your ACC record--on the test scantrons and do not use nicknames or variations of your proper name. 

DETERMINATION OF GRADE: PLEASE READ THIS CAREFULLY.
For an A: There are two requirements to be met: 1) Test average of at least 80% AND 2) a formal research paper. (See information about the paper below.)

You MUST have a test average of at least 80 to meet the rquirements for an A. If you submit a paper and do NOT have at least an 80 average, the highest grade for which you are eligible is C. No exceptions.


For a B: There are two different ways to earn a B.
1) at least 80% on each and all of the five tests. Nothing else needs to be done.
OR
2) an overall test average of at least 80% AND a book review. (See information about the review below.)

You MUST have a test average of at least 80 to meet this second option for making a B. If you submit a book review and do NOT have at least an 80 average, the highest grade for which you are eligible is C. No exceptions.


For a C
Test average of at least 70%. No writing requirement.

 

Test average below 70% will result in either a D (test average 60-69%) or F (test average 59% and below).

FORMAL RESEARCH PAPER
**See paragraph below headed "Scholastic Dishonesty."** 
Rationale: This term paper provides an opportunity for the student to examine, in depth, one specific event, topic, or person in American History. It will enable you to research an area of interest to you, define a specific sub-area of particular interest for further research, and then present the results in a well-written term paper. 
General Requirements: 
1. The topic will have something to do with United States history up to 1877. Instructor approval of topic is required. Try to find a topic that you are interested in. For example, someone planning to become a teacher may want to research 19th century education reform. A student interested in literature might focus on an American writer. 
You get the idea. 
2. The paper will be approximately 1750 to 2000 words long. This translates into seven or eight double-spaced, typed pages. Exceptions to these limits must be approved by the instructor before the paper is submitted. 
3. The term paper must include at least THREE PRIMARY sources and FOUR SECONDARY sources. A primary source is something written by an individual who lived at the time and took part in the event that he or she is describing. Primary sources usually take the form of letters, diaries, journals, newspapers, government documents, and autobiographies. 
Secondary sources are books, articles, and scholarly documentaries produced at a later time, usually by historians who were not participants in the event. 
Electronic sources must be carefully evaluated for scholarly merit and may make up no more than 25% of your sources. Electronic databases are helpful in finding primary sources. Your textbook, other survey textbooks, and general encyclopedias (including Wikipedia) are NOT ACCEPTABLE SOURCES because they cannot go into great detail. No term paper will be accepted unless it contains the requisite number of primary and secondary sources that are properly documented. If you have any questions about a source, ask the instructor. 
You are required to use the MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers.
It is available in libraries and bookstores. This manual will instruct you on the correct way to format the paper, the Works Cited page, and internal documentation. It also has example pages of what the very first page of the paper and what the Works Cited page should look like. 
4. Austin has numerous libraries and depositories including The University of Texas General Libraries, the Benson Latin American Collection, the Barker Texas History Center, the Travis County Collection of the Austin Public Library, the Lyndon B. Johnson Presidential Library, and many others in addition to the resources available at ACC. 
5. This term paper will be graded "ACCEPTED" or "NOT ACCEPTED." If you submit your term paper before the deadline date in the syllabus and it is graded "NOT ACCEPTED," you may revise it and resubmit it prior to the deadline date. 
DATES TO KEEP IN MIND:

-- SUBMIT YOUR TOPIC TO ME VIA E-MAIL ON OR BEFORE WEDNESDAY, JULY 17, 2013. 
-- SUBMIT YOUR PAPER TO ME VIA E-MAIL ON OR BEFORE FRIDAY,AUGUST 9, 2013. 

BOOK REVIEW
**See paragraph below headed "Scholastic Dishonesty."** 
Rationale: Writing a book review helps exercise and enhance critical thinking skills. 
1. A book review is NOT a book report. A review contains an analysis of the author as well as a summary of content. The review will be 4-5 pages in length (typed, double-spaced) and contain the following three elements: a) summary of content; b) analysis of author's ability to demonstrate her or his thesis; c) insight gained from reading the book. 
2. The book must be chosen from the list provided in this syllabus. Let me know via e-mail what book you choose. Click here to go to the book list. 
3. The BOOK REVIEW will be graded "ACCEPTED" or "NOT ACCEPTED." If you submit your book review before the deadline date in the syllabus and it is graded "NOT ACCEPTED," you may revise it and resubmit it prior to the deadline date. 
DATES TO KEEP IN MIND:

-- SUBMIT YOUR BOOK CHOICE TO ME VIA E-MAIL ON OR BEFORE WEDNESDAY, JULY 17, 2013.
-- SUBMIT YOUR BOOK REVIEW TO ME VIA E-MAIL ON OR BEFORE FRIDAY,AUGUST 9, 2013.

SCHOLASTIC DISHONESTY: From the ACC Student Handbook: "Acts prohibited by the College for which discipline may be administered include scholastic dishonesty, including but not limited to cheating on an exam or quiz, plagiarizing, and unauthorized collaboration with another in preparing outside work. Academic work submitted by students shall be the result of their thought, research or self-expression. Academic work is defined as, but not limited to tests, quizzes, whether taken electronically or on paper; projects, either individual or group; classroom presentations, and homework."
If cheating or plagiarizing occurs, the penalty is an Ffor the course. 
Definition of 'to plagiarize': "to steal and pass off (the ideas or words of another) as one's own : use (another's production) without crediting the source" -- definition from Merriam-Webster athttp://mw1.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/plagiarizing.

COURSE CONTACTS: Part of the course requirement is that you contact me after the third and fifth tests. This ensures that we stay "on the same page" with regard to your progress. The contacts can be done by e-mail, phone, or personal visit. Most students fulfill this requirement via e-mail.

GRANTING OF INCOMPLETES: An Incomplete will be given only in the most extreme cases and only if you have successfully completed at least 50% of the course work and you have at least a C average at the time of the request. Once an Incomplete is recorded, it is your responsibility to finish the work within a specified amount of time; otherwise, the Incomplete automatically changes to an F on your transcript.

WITHDRAWING FROM THE COURSE: It is your responsibility to withdraw from the class if you cannot meet the requirements. I retain the right to initiate withdrawal based on lack of progress or as a disciplinary measure. The last day to withdraw is August 7, 2013.

STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES POLICY: From the ACC Student Handbook: "Each ACC campus offers support services for students with documented physical or psychological disabilities. Students with disabilities must request reasonable accommodations through the Office for Students with Disabilities on the campus where they expect to take the majority of their classes. Students are encouraged to do this three weeks before the start of the semester."

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Student Learning Outcomes/Learning Objectives

STUDY GUIDE


Answering these questions will prepare you for the tests. 

NOTE: An online tutorial for the textbook is provided at the publisher's web site and I STRONGLY suggest you utilize this study tool. Chapter summaries and quizzes are available, and many students find this helpful. 
Click here to go to the web page. If you have difficulty with the web site, call the publisher's tech support. Their number is 1-800-936-6899.

 

Test #1


The first test is a map test. You will be asked to identify via a mutliple choice format: twenty (20) of the forty-eight (48) contiguous states; the five Great Lakes; five major rivers. A map like the one below will be used.
There are many maps in the textbook or online that will help you.

 


 

 

 

Page numbers are referenced to the 5th edition of The American Promise.

Test #2 (Chapters 1 - 4)


Chapter 1: "Ancient America: Before 1492"

1.What distinguishes the study of humans by archeaeologists from the study of humans by historians? p. 5

2. What kind of information do archaeologists use to understand ancient peoples?p. 5

3.What is the connection between the "Wisconsin glaciation period" and the Beringia land bridge? p. 7-8

4. How long did it take Paleo-Indians to complete their expansion to the southern tip of South American after they first migrated to the Western Hemisphere? p. 10

5.What do Paleo-Indian artifacts indicate about hunting practices for those people? p. 10

6.What does the term Archaic describe with regard to ancient peoples' lifestyles? p. 11

7. What archaeological find in Folsom, New Mexico, indicated that hunters and giant bison lived simultaneously? p. 11

8.How did the culture of Woodland peoples change circa 4000BP (before present era)? p. 15

9.Why did southwestern Archaic peoples adopt agriculture? p. 16

10. What commodity was necessary for southwestern peoples to know how to conserve? p. 16

11. Why do archaeologists believe mound builders were organized into chiefdoms? p. 19

12. What three groups represented the Eastern Woodland peoples at the time of Columbus's arrival in 1492? p. 21-2

13. What was the purpose of the League of Five Nations? p. 21-2

14. What socioeconomic class benefited from the Mexica tribute system of wealth redistribution? p. 25

 

Chapter 2: "Europeans Encounter the New World, 1492-1600"

1. Why did exploration and expansion become popular with European monarchs in the fifteenth century? p. 34

2. What role did the Bubonic Plague have in European desires for exploration? p. 34

3. How did the establishment of a sea route to Asia affect the market for Far Eastern goods in Europe? p. 34-5

4. What was the source of labor for Portuguese plantations in the Cape Verde islands? p. 35

5. What native peoples did Columbus first encounter? p. 36-7

6. What were the provisions of the Treaty of Tordesillas? p. 37

7. What does the term "Columbian exchange" mean? p. 39

8. Why was Magellan's circumnavigation of the world significant? p. 39

9. What did Spaniard's assumption about their own superiority mean for Indians with regard to coerced labor? p. 46

10. What was the purpose of "encomienda" in Spanish colonies? p. 46

11. What was the purpose of the "repartimiento" issued in 1549 by the Spanish government?p. 49

12. What was the central issue of Martin Luther's Protestant Reformation? p. 54

13. Who sponsored the explorer Martin Frobisher in the 1570s and what was he hoping to achieve? p. 55-6

 

Chapter 3: "The Southern Colonies in the Seventeenth Century, 1601-1700"

1. When James I of England granted land to the Virginia Company for the establishment of a colony, were prior land claims of native peoples and Spanish settlers honored? p. 63-4

2. How successful were early English attempts to sustain North American settlements? p. 65

3. How did Powhatan help the early Jamestown settlers? p. 65

4. What was the socioeconomic background of early Jamestown settlers? p. 65

5. How did the English colonists differ from Spanish colonists with regard to converting Indians to Christianity? p. 65

6. For whom could Virginia's inabitants vote under the rules of the royal government? p. 67

7. How did the "headright" system of immigration work? p. 69

8. What was the biggest obstacle to profitfor tobacco farmers in 1600s Virginia? p. 69-70

9. What was indentured servitude? How were indentured women treated differently than indentured men? p. 70-3

10. How did Chesapeake servants differ from servants in England? p. 73

11. What was the relationship between Catholics and Protestants in Maryland? p. 76

12. What does the term "yeoman planter" mean? p. 77

13. What were the issues of Bacon's Rebellion? What two groups were at odds with each other? p. 79-81

14. Why did the southern colonies shift from reliance on indentured servant labor to African slave labor? p. 81

15.What was the status of Spanish outposts in New Mexico and Florida by the end of the seventeenth century? p. 81-2

16. How did the Indian leader Pope respond to Spanish exploitation of his people in 1680? p. 82-3

17. How did slavery in the Chesapeake compare to slavery in Barbados? p. 85

 

Chapter 4: "The Northern Colonies in the Seventeenth Century, 1601-1700"

1. To what did New England Puritanism owe its roots? p. 93

2. What was unique about the Massachusetts Bay Company charter? p. 95

3. Why was Anne Hutchinson controversial? p. 102-3

4. How did the Boston church punish Anne Hutchinson? p. 102-3

5. What allowed New England's population to grow during the seventeenth century? p. 104

6. What was central to the belief of Quakers? p. 105

7. What European nation controlled New Netherland during most of the seventeenth century? p. 109

8. Why did the English allow religious toleration in the colony of New York? p. 110

9. Why did Charles II make the gift of a colony to William Penn? p. 111

10. What was the official Indian policy in colonial Pennsylvania? p. 112

11. What was the purpose of the Navigation Acts and how did they affect colonical commerce? p. 112

12. What characterized the commerical relationship between the colonies and England by the end of the 1600s? p. 113

13. What was the cause of f King Philip's War and what was its legacy for English settlers? p. 114

 

 

Test #3 (Chapters 5 -8)

Chapter 5: "Colonial America in the Eighteenth Century, 1701-1770"

1. How did colonial population change during the eighteenth century? p. 125

2. What caused the New England colonies to experience less growth than other colonies? p. 126

3. What was unique about the colonial standard of living in the eighteenth century? p. 126

4. What did the New England policy of "partible inheritance" mean? p. 127

5. How did the lives of the least wealthy in New England compare with the poor in England? p. 128

6. Why was slavery not as prevalent in New England colonies as in other colonies? p. 128

7. What group made up the largest number of immigrants to the middle colonies? p. 129

8. Why did the middle colonies have a smaller slave population than colonies in the south? p. 132

9. What Pennsylvania policy promoted settlement of that colony and led to reduced clashes with Indians? p. 133

10. How did the publication Poor Richard's Almanack reflect the beliefs of the typical Pennsylvania colonist? p. 135

11. Why did southern planters prefer to purchase newly arrived African slaves in small groups? p. 137-8

12. In addition to natural increase, what played a significant role in increasing the Southern slave population during the second half of the eighteenth century? p. 139

13. How did newly arrived African slaves develop kinship relations within existing communities of slaves? p. 139-40

14. What common experience characterized the otherwise distinct three regions of British North America? p. 141-2

15. What were the major characteristics of the Great Awakening? p. 145

16. Why did English colonial governors lack the trust of colonists? p. 149

 

Chapter 6: "The British Empire and the Colonial Crisis, 1754-1775"

1. What was the primary cause of the Seven Years' War? p. 159

2. How were Indians affected by the outcome of the Seven Years' War? p. 165-6

3. Why did George Grenville claim American colonists had "virtual representation" in the British Parliament? p. 169

4. How did the Stamp Act and Sugar Act affect colonists differently? p. 169

5. What was the central argument of the Virgina Resolves as outlined by PatrickHenry? p. 169

6. What did colonists learn from the Sons of Liberty about the effectiveness of public demonstrations? p. 170

7. What was the general colonial response to the Townshend Duties? p. 174

8. How did the Daughters of Liberty protest the Townshend Duties? p. 175-6

9. What was the Boston Massacre? p. 177-8

10. What was the purpose of the Tea Act, according to the British government? p. 179

11. What did the First Continental Congress declare with regard to Parliament's right to tax the colonies and regulate their trade? p. 182

12. Who fired the first shot at Lexington, Massachusetts? p. 184

13. What was the message of Lord Dunmore's Proclamation? p. 184-5

14. Who was Phyllis Wheatley and what were her accomplishments? p. 185

 

Chapter 7: "The War for America, 1775-1783"

1. What was the initial goal of the Second Continental Congress? p. 193

2. Why was the Second Continental Congress hesitant to break completely with Britain when it met in 1775? p. 193

3. Who wrote Common Sense and what was its message? p. 195-6

4. What obstacles faced the British army during the Revolutionary War? p. 198

5. Where did the British concentrate their troops by the end of 1776? p. 202

6. What challenges did General Washington face with regard to manpower within the Continental army? p. 198-9

7. How did Native Americans react to the war? p. 204

8. What happened to the valuation of money after the Continental Congress deicded to issue paper money? p. 210

9. How did the Continental Congress pay soldiers serving in the Continental army in the wake of depreciated currency? p. 210

10. How was a treasonable act punished by the American government? p. 205; 208

11. What was France's motivation in allying itself with the United States after the battle of Saratoga? p. 214

12. What was army morale low during the winter of 1777-78? p. 212

13. How did the French help the Americans win at Yorktown in 1781? p. 218-9

14. What did the Treat of Paris, ending the Revolutionary War, mean for Indians? p. 222

 

Chapter 8: "Building a Republic, 1775-1789"

1. What did the various state constitutions have in common with regard to separation of powers in state government? p. 232

2. Why did most states spell out rights and liberties within their state constitutions? p. 232

3. What was unusual about how Massachusetts slave Elizabeth Freeman achieved her freedom in 1781? p. 234

4. How did General Washington neutralize the Newburgh Conspiracy? p. 238

5. What did Congress accomplish with the land ordinances of 1784 and 1785? p. 240-1

6. What prevented continued American settlement in the Northwest Territory? p. 241

7. What did the Northwest Ordinance of 1787 say about slavery? p. 242

8. What is the connection between Shays' Rebellion and the decision to overhaul the Articles of Confederation? p. 244

9.How did delegates to the1787 Constitutional Convention view the Articles of Confederation? p. 246

10. Why did small population states object to the Vriginia Plan as presented at the beginning of the Constitutional Convention? p. 247

11. How did the convention delegates decide to count slaves when determining apportionment of representatives? p. 247

12. What mechanism did the delegates come up with to choose the president? p. 248

13. Which three populous states opposed the 1787 Constitution? p. 248

14. . What is the definition of "federalist" and "anti-federalist" with regard to support of the new constitution? p. 248-251

15. Why did James Madison describe--in Federalist #10--representative government as the "republican remedy" to the problem of faction? p. 254

 

 

Test #4 (Chapters 9 -12)

Chapter 9: "The New Nation Takes Form, 1789-1800"

1. How did different viewpoints about Britain and France help create the rift between Thomas Jefferson and Alexander Hamilton? p. 260

2. How did George Washington conduct himself once he became president? p. 261

3. What promise with regard to ratification of the Constitution was redeemed with the creation of the Bill of Rights by the first Congress? p. 264

4. What is the issue in the eighth and ninth amendments to the Constitution? p. 264

5. Acccording to republican ideals, what was the primary role for women in early America? p. 264-5

6. Why did Secretary of Treasury Hamilton adovcate replacing old certificates of debt with new government bonds? p. 266

7. Why did Secretary of Treasury Hamilton adovcatefederal assumption of the individual states' old Revolutionary Wary debt? p. 266-7

8. What caused the Whiskey Rebellion and how did the federal government respond to it? p. 269

9. What was the policy of the American government toward Indians in the Northwest Territory? p. 272

10. What clash with Indians in the Northwest Territory led to the Treaty of Grenville? p. 273-4

11. Why was the Jay Treaty not supported by many Americans? p. 276

12. By the late 1790s, what foreign nation tended to have the support of the Republican party? p. 279

13. Who won the presidency and vice-presidency in 1796? p. 279-80

14. What was the "XYZ Affair"? p. 280

15. What was the purpose of the 1798 Sedition Act? 281-2

16. What opinion of party politics did Thomas Jefferson suggest in his inaugural address? p. 285

 

Chapter 10: "Republicans in Power, 1800-1824"

1. What did Thomas Jefferson mean when he called his election to the presidency the "revolution of 1800"? p. 291

2. What was the purpose of the 1801 "midnight judges" appointments by out-going president John Adams? p. 293

3. What was the lasting significance of the Supreme Court case Marbury v. Madison? p. 293

4. Why was the United States concerned when Spain returned control of Louisiana to France? p. 295

5. What was the result of Robert Livingston's negotiations with France for the purchase of the city of New Orleans? p. 295-6

6. What was the government's response to the sinking of the ship Chesapeake in 1807? p. 300

7. From what part of the United States did the "War Hawk" congressmen come? p. 303

8. Why did congressmen from New England and some Middle Atlantic colonies oppose declaring war on Britain in 1812? p. 303

9. How did state legislatures react to the opportunity to rewrite laws of domestic relations during the early years of the United States? p. 306

10. Why were slave marriages not governed by the same unequal power relationship characteristic of white marriage? p. 306

11. For what career did female seminaries (academies) prepare women? p. 307-8

12. What political alliances were made in the House of Representatives to ensure passage of the Missouri Compromise of 1820? p. 312

13. How did the lack of multiple political parties complicate the presidential election of 1824? p. 314-5

14. What was Henry Clay's "American System"? p. 315

15. In what area did President John Quincy Adams consider himself to be continuing the work of previous presidents Jefferson and Madison?' p. 316

 

Chapter 11: "The Expanding Republic, 1815-1840"

1. Why were canals important to the national economy? p. 324

2. Why were wages low for Massachusetts mill workers? p. 326-7

3. What role did bankers have in the economy of the nation during the Jackson Era? 327

4. What belief about self-determination was a hallmark of the Jacksonian Era? p. 330-1

5. How did political leaders feel about party politics after 1828? p. 331

6. Why did the numbers of voters increase between 1824 and 1828? p. 331

7. What was the Trail of Tears? p. 334

8. What argument about nullification was made by John Calhoun in response to the Tariff of Abominations? p. 337

9. How did church membership change during the first decades of the 1800s? p. 342

10. What state banned the manufacture and sale of alcoholic beverages in 1851? p. 343

11. Who was William Lloyd Garrison and what did he advocate in his newspaper? p. 345

12. What obstacles did female abolitionist lecturers face that their male counterparts did not? p. 346

13. Why was Martin Van Buren known as "The Little Magician" in political circles? p. 347

14. On what did Whigs blame the Panic of 1837? p. 350-1

 

Chapter 12: "The New West and Free North, 1840-1860"

2. What four fundamental changes in American society fueled the phenomenal economic growthhe growth of the 1840s-50s? p. 359

3. What arguments were made in favor of "free-labor" by people in the north and west? p. 364

4. What did John O'Sullivan mean by the term "manifest destiny"? p. 370

5. How did the U.S. and Britain resolve their competing claims to the Oregon country? p. 370

6.How did Mormons in Utah adapt to the dry climate? p. 374

7. What sort of people migrated to Texas with Stephen Austin in the 1820s? p. 375

8. What event secured Texas's independence from Mexico? p. 376

9. How did President John Tyler secure approval for the annexation of Texas? p. 378

10. How did the U.S. acquire what is now the southwestern states? p. 378-381

11. What were the terms of the 1848 Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo? p. 381

12. Why did massive numbers of immigrants go to California during late 1840s?p. 382

13. What did New England transcendentalists believe? p. 385

14. What beliefs were advocated at the 1848 Seneca Falls women's rights convention? p. 386-7

15. How did abolitionists make their issue more attractive to white northerners? p. 387

16. By 1855, what was the most notable success to date for African-Americans in New England? p. 388

 

Test #5 (Chapters 13 -16)

Chapter 13: "The Slave South, 1820-1860"

1. What role did westward expansion of cotton production have on increasing southern political power? p. 395

2. What percentage of world cotton supplies came from the American south by 1860? p. 395

4. How did slavery contribute ti race consencus amongst whites in the South? p. 396-7

3. Why did newly arrived European immigrants settle in the North instead of the South? p. 403

5. What did plantation owners mean by the term "paternalism"? p. 404

7. How did southern men's emphasis on chivalry affect southern law? p. 408

6. What issue did the diarist Mary Chestnut Boykin expose as being of great concern to planter class women? p. 409

8. What tasks were assigned to elderly male slaves? p. 411

9. What was an advantage of being a house servant instead of a field hand? p. 411

10. What was the most common way for slaves to protest their bondage? p. 414

11. To what did most yeoman farmers aspire in the old South? p. 416

12. In what respect did yeoman farmers depend on the planter class? p. 416

14. What educational opportunities were available for free blacks in the antebellum South? p. 419

13. By the 1850s, who was eligible to vote in the Southern states? p. 420

 

Chapter 14: "The House Divided, 1846-1861"

1. What was proposed by the 1846 Wilmot Proviso? p. 430

2. What was the meaning of "popular sovereignty" as understood by Senator Lewis Cass? p. 430

3. What was the issue that led to the Compromise of 1850? p. 432-4

4. What were the provisions of the Fugitive Slave Act that was part of the Compromise of 1850? p. 434

5. What was Stephen Douglas's purpose in repealing the Missouri Compromise in the Kansas-Nebraska Act? p. 437

6. What effect did the 1854 Kansas-Nebraska Act have on political party formation? p. 438

7. Around what issue did northern Republicans rally in 1854? p. 440

8. What did the presidential election of 1856 reveal about the relative strengths/weaknesses of the Democractic and Republican parties? p. 443-4

9. What were the proponents of the 1857 Dred Scott Supreme Court decision? p. 448

10. How did Abraham Lincoln's views on the extension of slavery influence his search for a political party home in the mid-1850s? p. 449

11. How did the Lincoln-Douglas debates help inrease Abraham Lincoln's national profile? p. 451

12. What happened to John Brown after his raid on Harpers Ferry, Virginia? p. 451

13. What factors led to Abraham Lincoln being chosen as the Republican presidential candidate in 1860? p. 453

14. Why did slave states in the Upper South initially resist secession? p. 455

15. How did out-going President James Buchanan respond to secession of the southern states? p. 455-6

16. How did Lincoln address the crisis in his inaugural address? p. 456

 

 

Chapter 15: "The Crucible of War, 1861-1865"

1. What events marked the official beginning of the Civil War? p. 463-4

2. What was the situation in the border states of Missouri and Kentucky? p. 464

3. Why did white Southerners from all classes enlist to fight against the north? p. 465

4. How did most Northerners view secession? p. 465

5. What was "King Cotton diplomacy" and why did it fail? p. 466

6. What was the status of the war in the eastern theater at the end of 1862? p. 470

7. How did General Ulysses Grant create a sophisticated war machine? p. 471

8. What was Lincoln's motivation for issuing the Emancipation Proclamation? p. 476-7

9. How did free black men of fighting age in the North respond to the outbreak of war? p. 478

10. What was the "twenty-Negro law" in the South? p. 481-2

11. What caused the standard of living to fall for the working class in the North during the war? p. 484

12. What was the result of the Battle of Vicksburg in 1863? p. 486

13. In what state did General William T. Sherman initially employ his scorched-earth campaign? p. 491

14. What factors contributed to the demoralization of Confederate troops by the last months of the war? p. 493

15. What terms did General Grant offer to General Lee at Appomattox Court House in April of 1865? 493

 

Chapter 16: "Reconstruction, 1863-1877"

1. Under Lincoln's plan for reconstructions, what was required of a Confederate state before it was readmitted to the Union? p. 501

2. Why were pardons to former Confederate soldiers under Lincoln's Proclamation of Amnesty and Reconstruction important? p. 501

3. What effect did the policies of the Freeman's Bureau and "Sherman land" have on the aspirations of former slaves? p. 503

4. Why did President Andrew Johnson's plan for reconstruction shock reformers? 508

5. What was the purpose of southern states' "black codes"? p. 508

6. How did moderate and radical Republicans differ in 1865 with regard to black suffrage and black land ownership? p. 509-10

7. What was the outcome of President Johnson's attempt to unite opponents to the fourteenth amendment? p. 511

8. What are the three reconstruction era constitutional amendments and how were blacks affected by each of them? p. 514

9. How did the passage of the fifteenth amendment shape future Republican Party policy with regard to black civil rights? p. 515

10. How did the Ku Klux Klan begin and develop? p. 518

11. What happened to most sharecroppers once they borrowed goods on a crop lien? p. 523

12. Who were southern "redeemers"? p. 526-7

13. What characterized Supreme Court decisions in the years following the Civil War? p. 526

14. What characterized the Compromise of 1877? p. 529

 

 

Here are a few sample test questions:

How did the English monarchs James I and Charles I react to the ideas of Puritan reformers?

A) Both monarchs embraced strict Catholicism.

B) Both worked with Parliament to ease religious tensions.

C) Both struggled to implement Protestant reforms.

D) Both enforced conformity to the Church of England.

Penny press newspapers became popular with American readers in the 1830s by featuring
A) sophisticated analysis of political issues. 
B) highbrow literature in serialized form. 
C) breezy political coverage, irreverent editorials on current events, and crime reporting. 
D) all of the above.

In the Lower South in 1860, 
A) blacks outnumbered whites in all states. 
B) whites outnumbered blacks in all states. 
C) the numbers of whites and blacks were almost equal in number. 
D) there were about as many blacks as there were in the North.

 

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