Syllabus
Intermediate Pipe Welding -- ASME Section IX

Syllabus Sections

Publish Date

09/20/2012 16:52:12

Intermediate Pipe Welding -- ASME Section IX

WLDG-2406

Fall 2012
08/27/2012 - 12/16/2012

Course Information

Section 004
Lecture
TTh 7:45PM - 10:20PM
RVSC 3117
Robert (Bob) Gilde
rgilde@austincc.edu

Office Hours

  • T Th
    4:30 - 5:00
    rvs
    room 3121a by appointment only.

Course Requirements

 

WLDG 2406: Intermediate Pipe Welding—ASME Section IX

 

 

Welding Technology Department

Austin Community College

 

Riverside Office: (512) 223-6443

Round Rock Office: (512) 223-0358

 

SYLLABUS

 

Course Description

WLDG 2406: Intermediate Pipe Welding—ASME Section IX.  Comprehensive course on the welding of pipe using the shielded metal arc welding (SMAW) process.  Positions of welds will be 1G, 2G, 5G and 6G using various electrodes in accordance with the American Society of Me­chanical Engineers Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, Section IX.  Topics covered include elec­trode selection, equipment setup and safe shop practices.  This is the Capstone Experience course for the Pipe Welding Certificate.  Course Fee: $50.00; Course Type: W

Prerequisite: WLDG 1457: Intermediate Shielded Metal Arc Welding.

 

Course Rationale

Students take this course typically to satisfy one of the following objectives:

ü  You are pursuing a Certificate or an Associate of Applied Science degree in Welding Tech­nology at Austin Community College, and this course is one of your curriculum require­ments.

ü  You have been employed previously in the field of welding technology but not as a pipe welder, and you need to obtain pipe welding skills.

ü  You are an API 1104 pipe welder, but you need to supplement your skills by learning to weld in accordance with ASME BPV Section IX.

 

End-of-Course Outcomes

Describe equipment and required pipe preparation; perform welds using various positions.

 

Credit and Format

You will receive four hours of college credit when you successfully complete this course.  Dur­ing the fall and spring semesters, the course will meet for sixteen weeks scheduled in one of the fol­lowing formats: (1) twice weekly for 2:35 hours per class, or (2) once weekly for 5:20 hours per class.  During the summer, the course will meet 16 times: (1) twice weekly for 5:10 hours per class.  Regardless of format, the total class time for this course is eighty clock hours.  

Tuition is charged at the rate posted in the current Course Schedule, depending upon whether you live in-district, out-of-district, or out-of-state.  In addition, there is a $50.00 course fee to cover welding electrodes, gases, practice metal and incidental consumables, plus a $1.00 per course fee which provides you with an accident insurance policy ($25.00 deductible).

Attendance/ Class Participation

Regular and punctual class and laboratory attendance is expected of all students. If attendance or compliance with other course policies is unsatisfactory, the instructor may withdraw students from the class.  If you accumulate unexcused absences exceeding 10% of the total eighty clock-hours re­quired for this course by the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board, you will be dropped from class.  You will receive the grade of W.  If the final semester withdrawal date has passed, you will receive the grade of F.

Your absences will be recorded on the last page of your Projects List presented at the back of this syllabus.  It is your responsibility—not your instructor’s—to keep track of your absences.

Excessive absences result in (1) your failure to progress towards the objectives of the course, (2) unfair demands on your instructor's time by taking him/her away from respon­sible students in or­der to catch you up on missed assignments, and most important (3) you become an increased safety risk due to your diminished familiarity with hazardous equipment and safety protocols.

 

Important Information on Advising

If you have decided to pursue a degree or certificate in Welding Technology, it is essen­tial that you obtain departmental advising immediately.  There are several critical obliga­tions that stu­dents overlook, then later expect the College to make exceptions for their oversight when the time comes to graduate.  It is your responsibility to obtain a copy of the ACC College Catalog and stay informed of your obligations:

  1. Failure to Follow a Degree or Certificate Plan:  It is imperative that you adhere to a weld­ing degree or certificate plan outlined in the ACC College Catalog current at the time of your initial enrollment.  It is your responsibility to seek out the ap­propriate departmental advisor to work with you in preparing a degree plan, and to approve restricted electives, course substitutions, and course challenges (if al­lowed).  Failure to do so can result in your graduation application being denied until such time that you comply with College policy.
  2. Texas Success Initiative (TSI):  Texas law created the Texas Success Initiative (TSI), which requires all degree-seeking students to take the Texas Higher Education Assess­ment (THEA) test or an approved alternative.  Students may forgo TSI as­sessment if they meet one of the waivers or exemptions listed in the ACC College Catalog.
  3. Inadequate Record Keeping:  From the time you first enroll, you should create a home file and keep records of your paperwork each semester.  As a minimum, these records should include your degree plan, TSI scores, enrollment records, payment receipts, and semester grade reports.   
  4. Application for Graduation:  If you are eligible for graduation with a degree or cer­tificate in Welding Technology, you must submit your application for gradua­tion no later than the posted deadline.  This deadline comes early in the semester, so consult the current ACC Academic Calendar for the exact date.  Then, apply for graduation through your student Online Services account.  Do not miss this deadline or you will for­feit graduating that semester.
  5. Failure to Apply for Certificates Before Applying for a Degree:  You cannot re­ceive a cer­tificate at the same time (or after) you receive your Associate of Ap­plied Science degree.  Certificates are progressive awards received in stair-step fashion on the way to complet­ing your associate’s degree.  You should apply for them as soon as you have completed their requirements—not wait until the same semester that you apply for your degree.  If you have a question, contact the ACC Graduation Office at (512) 223-7018.
  6. Minimum Grades for Graduation:  Only grades of C or better may be applied toward any degree, certificate, or award in Welding Technology.  This applies to courses taken at ACC and to credits transferred from any other institution. 

 

Students with Disabilities

Each ACC campus offers support services for students with documented disabilities. Students with disabilities who need classroom, academic or other accommodations must request them through the Office for Students with Disabilities (OSD). Students are encouraged to request accommodations when they register for courses or at least three weeks before the start of the semester, otherwise the provision of accommodations may be delayed. 

Students who have received approval for accommodations from OSD for this course must provide the instructor with the ‘Notice of Approved Accommodations’ from OSD before accommodations will be provided. Arrangements for academic accommodations can only be made after the instructor receives the ‘Notice of Approved Accommodations’ from the student. 

Students with approved accommodations are encouraged to submit the ‘Notice of Approved Accommodations’ to the instructor at the beginning of the semester because a reasonable amount of time may be needed to prepare and arrange for the accommodations. Additional information about the Office for Students with Disabilities is available: http://www.austincc.edu/support/osd/

 

Scholastic Dishonesty

A student attending ACC assumes responsibility for conduct compatible with the mission of the college as an educational institution. Students have the responsibility to submit coursework that is the result of their own thought, research, or self-expression. Students must follow all instructions given by faculty or designatedcollege representatives when taking examinations, placement assessments, tests, quizzes, and evaluations. 

Actions constituting scholastic dishonesty include, but are not limited to, plagiarism, cheating, fabrication, collusion, and falsifying documents. Penalties for scholastic dishonesty will depend upon the nature of the violation and may range from lowering a grade on one assignment to an “F” in the course and/or expulsion from the college. See the Student Standards of Conduct and Disciplinary Process and other policies at http://www.austincc.edu/current/needtoknow.

 

 

 

 

SCANS Competencies

The U.S. Department of Labor appointed a Secretary's Commission on Achieving Necessary Skills (SCANS) to determine the general academic and workforce skills needed to succeed in the workplace.  The Commission's purpose has been to encourage a vital national economy based on a highly skilled workforce.  The Welding Technology Department at Austin Community College incorporates these SCANS competencies into its course offerings by means of classroom instruction, lab exercises, student interaction, and specific work-related assignments.  A listing of the SCANS competencies for each welding course is as follows:

Program:  Welding Technology- Code Welding        

List of All Courses Required and Identified Competencies

Competencies

Course

CIP:  48.0508

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

Number

Course Title

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

NDTE-1405

 Introduction to Ultrasonic Testing

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

NDTE-1454

 Intermediate Ultrasonics

X

 

X

X

X

X

X

X

NDTE-2411

 Preparation for Certified Welding Inspector Exam

X

 

X

X

X

X

X

X

WLDG-1407

 Introduction to Welding Using Multiple Processes

X

 

X

X

X

X

X

X

WLDG-1413

 Introduction to Blueprint Reading for Welders

X

 

X

X

X

X

X

X

WLDG-1417

 Introduction to Layout and Fabrication

X

 

X

X

X

X

X

X

WLDG-1425

 Introduction to Oxy-Fuel Welding and Cutting

X

 

X

X

X

X

X

X

WLDG-1427

 Welding Codes and Standards

X

 

X

X

X

X

X

X

WLDG-1428

 Introduction to Shielded Metal Arc Welding (SMAW)

X

 

X

X

X

X

X

X

WLDG-1430

 Introduction to Gas Metal Arc Welding (GMAW) & (FCAW)

X

 

X

X

X

X

X

X

WLDG-1434

 Introduction to Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW)

X

 

X

X

X

X

X

X

WLDG-1435

 Introduction to Pipe Welding- API 1104

X

 

X

X

X

X

X

X

WLDG-1437

 Introduction to Welding Metallurgy

X

 

X

X

X

X

X

X

WLDG-1453

 Intermediate Layout and Fabrication (Structural Connections)

X

 

X

X

X

X

X

X

WLDG-1457

 Intermediate Shielded Metal Arc Welding (SMAW)

X

 

X

X

X

X

X

X

WLDG-2406

 Intermediate Pipe Welding- ASME Section IX

X

 

X

X

X

X

X

X

WLDG-2431

 Advanced Blueprint Interpretation and Cost Analysis

X

 

X

X

X

X

X

X

WLDG-2435

 Advanced Layout and Fabrication

X

 

X

X

X

X

X

X

WLDG-2450

 Orbital Tube Welding

X

 

X

X

X

X

X

X

WLDG-2451

 Advanced Gas Tungsten Arc Welding

X

 

X

X

X

X

X

X

WLDG-2479

Welder Qualification

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

COMPETENCY REFERENCES

8. PERSONAL QUALITIES

7. THINKING SKILLS

6. BASIC SKILLS

5. TECHNOLOGY

4. SYSTEMS

3. INFORMATION

2. INTERPERSONAL

1. RESOURCES

Further information about SCANS can be found at the following ACC website:

http://www.austincc.edu/mkt/scans.php

Student Rights and Responsibilities

Students at the college have the rights accorded by the U.S. Constitution to freedom of speech, peaceful assembly, petition, and association. These rights carry with them the responsibility to accord the same rights to others in the college community and not to interfere with or disrupt the educational process. Opportunity for students to examine and question pertinent data and assumptions of a given discipline, guided by the evidence of scholarly research, is appropriate in a learning environment. This concept is accompanied by an equally demanding concept of responsibility on the part of the student. As willing partners in learning, students must 
comply with college rules and procedures.

 

Annual Course Offerings

Below is the sequence in which courses are offered annually in the Welding Technology Depart­ment.  You should note that not all courses are offered each semester and should arrange your schedule ac­cordingly.  Advanced courses with low demand are scheduled only once an­nually, and in some cases, only when there is sufficient demand.

 

Each Semester

The following courses are in high demand and are scheduled each semester:

 

WLDG 1413

Introduction to Blueprint Reading for Welders

WLDG 1417

Introduction to Layout and Fabrication

WLDG 1425

Introduction to Oxy-Fuel Welding and Cutting

WLDG 1428

Introduction to Shielded Metal Arc Welding (SMAW)

WLDG 1430

Introduction to Gas Metal Arc Welding (GMAW) and Flux Cored Arc Welding (FCAW)

WLDG 1434

Introduction to Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW)

WLDG 1435

Introduction to Pipe Welding—API 1104

WLDG 1453

Intermediate Layout and Fabrication (Structural Connections)

WLDG 1457

Intermediate Shielded Metal Arc Welding (SMAW)

WLDG 2406

Intermediate Pipe Welding—ASME Section IX

WLDG 2431

Advanced Blueprint Interpretation and Cost Analysis (not available in Summer)

 

WLDG 2451

WLDG 2479

Advanced Gas Tungsten Arc Welding

Welder Qualification

 

Fall Semester Only

The following courses are offered in the fall semester only.  Some are prerequi­sites for courses that are offered only in the spring semester, so failing to take one of them in sequence may keep you from graduating with your certificate or degree on time:

 

WLDG 1437

Intro to Welding Metallurgy (Riverside Campus Only)

WLDG 1427

Welding Codes and Standards

WLDG 2450

Orbital Tube Welding (Riverside Campus Only)

NDTE 1405

Introduction to Ultrasonic Testing

 

 

Spring Semester Only

The following courses are scheduled in the spring semester only.  Some cannot be taken without first completing their prerequisite in the preceding fall semester:

 

 

WLDG 1437

Intro to Welding Metallurgy (Round Rock Campus Only)

NDTE 2411

Preparation for Certified Welding Inspector Exam

NDTE 1454

Intermediate Ultrasonics

WLDG 2450

   Orbital Tube Welding (Round Rock Campus Only)

 

       

 

Withdrawal from Classes

It is the responsibility of each student to ensure that his or her name is removed from the roll should he or she decide to withdraw from the class. The instructor does, however, reserve the right to drop a student should he or she feel it is necessary. If a student decides to withdraw, he or she should also verify that the withdrawal is submitted before the Final Withdrawal Date. The student is also strongly encouraged to retain their copy of the withdrawal form for their records.

Students who enroll for the third or subsequent time in a course taken since Fall, 2002, may be charged a higher tuition rate, for that course.

State law permits students to withdraw from no more than six courses during their entire undergraduate career at Texas public colleges or universities. With certain exceptions, all course withdrawals automatically count towards this limit. Details regarding this policy can be found in the ACC college catalog.

 

Incomplete Grades

Strive to complete your work on time.  The grade of Incomplete is given only if you can substan­tiate why assignments were not completed due to an insurmountable schedule conflict that oc­curred after the final date for withdrawing from the course.  The Incomplete grade must be re­moved before the deadline during the following semester, or it will automatically convert to a fi­nal grade of F.  Consult the calendar in the current College Catalog for the removal date deadline during the following semester.  It is not your instructor's re­sponsibility to remind you of this date.

 

Grading Policy

Your final grade will be based on your progress throughout the semester in the areas of

applied skills (projects) and theory (examinations), weighted as follows:

1... Projects................................. 60%

2... Examinations........................ 40%

Your applied skills will develop as you progress through the Project List given later in this sylla­bus.  The Project List contains important accumulative projects, so your final applied skills grade will be based on the percentage of projects you complete.

Theory is also an important part of this course.  While applied skills are invaluable for learning what to do, a welding technician must also know the theory behind why things happen.  Your in­structor will provide appropriate written exams to measure your understanding of welding theory.

When calculating the above percentages, the following grading system is used at Austin Commu­nity College:

A—Excellent................. 90% - 100%.............. Grade Points 4

B—Good......................... 80% - 89%.................................... 3

C—Satisfactory............... 70% - 79%.................................... 2

D—Minimum Pass........... 60% - 69%.................................... 1

F—Fail............................. 59% - 00%.................................... 0

 

Makeup Work

If you must make up work at a class time other than that for which you are scheduled, you must comply with the following rules:

1.      You must sign in using the Attendance Sheet for the Welding Department found in the white notebook posted on the wall next to the hall door leading into Welding Labo­ratory 3122.  This is a liability insurance requirement.

2.      You must have the approval and supervision of a faculty member at all times while you are working.  You must notify that person when you arrive and leave.  You must not work unattended.

3.      When you have finished working, you must clean up your work area, sign out, and in­form the faculty member on duty that you are leaving.

 

For More Information

It is your responsibility to stay informed regarding the policies and deadlines that affect you as a student.  This information can be found in the following sources, which can be found online or in the Admissions, Student Services, or Financial Aid Office on any campus:

1.   Course Schedule (online)

2.    Academic Calendar (online)

3.   Student Handbook (free; also available online)

4.   College Catalog (nominal charge; also available online)

 

Use of ACC Email

All College e-mail communication to students will be sent solely to the student’s ACCmail account, with the expectation that such communications will be read in a timely fashion. ACC will send important Financial Aid, waitlisting, enrollment, and other information to this account and will notify you of any college related emergencies using this account. Students should only expect to receive email communication from their instructor using this account. Likewise, students should use their ACCmail account when communicating with instructors and staff. Instructions for activating an ACCmail account can be found at  http://www.austincc.edu/accmail/index.php.

Testing Center Policy

Under certain circumstances, an instructor may have students take an examination in a testing center.  Students using the Academic Testing Center must govern themselves according to the Student Guide for Use of ACC Testing Centers and should read the entire guide before going to take the exam. 

To request an exam, one must have:

ACC Photo ID
• Course Abbreviation (e.g., ENGL)
• Course Number (e.g.,1301)
• Course Synonym (e.g., 10123)
• Course Section (e.g., 005)
• Instructor's Name

Do NOT bring cell phones to the Testing Center. Having your cell phone in the testing room, 
regardless of whether it is on or off, will revoke your testing privileges for the remainder of the semester. 
ACC Testing Center policies can be found at http://www.austincc.edu/testctr/

 

Student and Instructional Services

ACC strives to provide exemplary support to its students and offers a broad variety of opportunities and services. Information on these services and support systems is available at: http://www.austincc.edu/s4/

Links to many student services and other information can be found at: http://www.austincc.edu/current/

ACC Learning Labs provide free tutoring services to all ACC students currently enrolled in the course to be tutored. The tutor schedule for each Learning Lab may be found at: 
http://www.autincc.edu/tutor/students/tutoring.php

For help setting up your ACCeID, ACC Gmail, or ACC Blackboard, see a Learning Lab Technician at any ACC Learning Lab.

ACC Safety Statement

Austin Community College is committed to providing a safe and healthy environment for study and work. You are expected to learn and comply with ACC environmental, health and safety procedures and agree to follow ACC safety policies. Additional information on these can be found at http://www.austincc.edu/ehs.  Because some health and safety circumstances are beyond our control, we ask that you become familiar with the Emergency Procedures poster and Campus Safety Plan map in each classroom. Additional information about emergency procedures and how to sign up for ACC Emergency Alerts to be notified in the event of a serious emergency can be found at http://www.austincc.edu/emergency/.

Please note, you are expected to conduct yourself professionally with respect and courtesy to all. Anyone who thoughtlessly or intentionally jeopardizes the health or safety of another individual will be dismissed from the day’s activity, may be withdrawn from the class, and/or barred from attending future activities.

Safety Regulations

Welding can become very dangerous—even fatal—if you are careless and neglect safety precautions.  Most accidents occur when people get in a hurry, so learn to pace yourself and move cautiously and deliberately.  The College endeavors to provide you with proper training and a safe environment, but you must also do your part by abiding by the following rules.  If you per­sistently violate these rules, you will be considered a safety risk and will be withdrawn from class:

1.      Wear your safety glasses at all times. 

2.      Wear your ear plugs in areas of high noise levels.

3.      Know the locations and proper use of fire extinguishers.  They are located at the exit to every classroom and laboratory.

4.      Do not weld or grind near oxy-fuel tanks, manifold connections, or other potential sources for gas leaks.

5.      Beware of the signs of dehydration, especially during warm months: disorientation, confusion, light-headedness, flushed appearance, headache, exhaustion.  Do not wait until these signs appear—drink fluids and take breaks regularly.                                                                          

6.      Be mindful of proper ventilation in your work area.

7.      When using portable grinders, be sure that you direct sparks away from others.

8.      When using stationary pedestal grinders, be sure that the tool rest is adjusted as close to the grinding wheel as possible without touching it (1/16”).  Always wear safety glasses when grinding and wire brushing.  Do not wear gloves when using pedestal grinders.

9.      Do not handle oxy-fuel equipment with oil or grease on your hands or clothing.

10.  Do not wear loose clothing or dangling jewelry when working in the lab; tie up long hair.

11.  Be sure that you have the proper shade of filter lens in your welding helmet or face shield.

12.  Do not attach your ground lead to water pipes or electrical conduit.

13.  When welding in a booth, keep your door closed.  When welding in an open area, shield your arc with welding curtains.  Always consider the line-of-sight between your arc and the eyes of bystanders.

14.  To avoid burns to others, do not discard hot metal without first quenching it.  Write “HOT” on objects too large to bring to the quench tank.

15.  Read Chapter 2:  “Safety in Welding” in your textbook by Larry Jeffus, Welding Principles and Applications, mentioned later in this syllabus.

16.  Report all accidents to your instructor without delay.  If you suspect an unsafe condition or an equipment malfunction, bring it to you instructor’s attention IMMEDIATELY.

 

Special Warning about Bloodborne Pathogens

A number of very serious Bloodborne Pathogens lurk in today’s public environments that can be devastating to your health—even fatal:

·         HIV — Human Immunodeficiency Virus

·         AIDS — Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome

·         Hepatitis A, B and C

·         Tetanus — “lockjaw”

·         MRSA — Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus

·         Necrotizing Fasciitis— “flesh-eating disease”

If you sustain a nick, cut, puncture, abrasion, or any wound in which blood surfaces—however minor—cease all activity immediately and proceed to a First Aid Kit to apply antiseptic and a protective bandage.  Time is critical in treating Bloodborne Pathogens.  Notify your instructor, who will call Campus Police for further assessment, and if necessary, Austin Emergency Medical Services will be notified.

You will need to fill out the following forms, as appropriate, to activate your student liability insurance.  If your injury requires emergency room treatment, it is much easier to have your forms with you at the time of admittance.  It is infinitely more tedious getting signatures from treating physicians and hospital personnel days after the occurrence.  These forms are attached to the cabinet doors of the First Aid Kits:

1.      Student Accident Liability Form

2.      First Aid Log

3.      Near-Miss Form

 

Laboratory Policy

1.   You must attend class at the time for which you are enrolled. 

2.   When you complete a project, request approval from your instructor.  You will not be cred­ited for unproved projects.

3.   Cleanup time is ten minutes before the end of class.  Sweep your immediate work area and re­turn equip­ment to the tool room.  Surrounding work areas must be cleaned with the com­bined efforts of all stu­dents.

4.   Do not waste metal.  Cut away practice welds and consolidate pieces.  Do not remove metal from the shop.  This will help keep lab fees reasonable in the face of rising costs for steel.

5.      If there is an equipment malfunction, inform your instructor immediately so that it can be re­paired and returned to service.

6.      Smoking is not permitted on campus.

 

Supplies

You are preparing to enter the profession of welding, and like other technical crafts, it requires specialized tools and equipment.  Therefore, you will be required to purchase the following items.  Remember that quality tools cost more initially, but over time, they are actually less expensive.  They are more durable and will give you pride of ownership for years to come.  Please be aware that you will not be allowed to work in the lab if you are not properly dressed.

 

Introductory Supply List—You are required to have the items below for the following courses:

 

WLDG 1407: Introduction to Welding Using Multiple Processes

WLDG 1417: Introduction to Layout and Fabrication

WLDG 1425: Introduction to Oxy/Fuel Welding and Cutting

WLDG 1428: Introduction to Shielded Metal Arc Welding

WLDG 1430: Introduction to Gas Metal Arc Welding

WLDG 1434: Introduction to Gas Tungsten Arc Welding

 


  1. Safety glasses
  2. Ear plugs
  3. Welding hood with replacement lenses
  4. Boots or high-top shoes
  5. Gauntlets or gloves, according to your class
  6. Leather sleeves or jacket
  7. Long sleeve heavy cotton work shirt (i.e. Wrangler, Lapco, Carhart)
  8. Face shield with clear lenses
  9. Cutting glasses or face shield with shade 4 or 5 lenses
  10. Hand wire brush
  11. Chipping hammer
  12. Striker with flint replacements
  13. Oxy/Fuel tip cleaners
  14. Soapstone with holder
  15. 6” needle-nose pliers with side cutter, if taking a GMAW course (Welder’s Plier such as Welpers™ recommended)
  16. Vice Grips™ 10R, or 10WR, or 10CR
  17. 12” combination square with steel blade
  18. 25” retractable tape measure (Stanley™ Brand preferred)
  19. 4½” diameter grinder
  20. Extra grinding disks (1/4”x4 ½”)
  21. Extra wire wheels (4 ½”)
  22. 2-lb ball peen hammer
  23. 8” crescent wrench
  24. Tool box or bucket or tool bag

 

Intermediate Supply List and Advanced Supply List —In addition to the Introductory List, you are required to have the items below for the following courses:

 

WLDG 1453: Intermediate Layout and Fabrication—Structural Connections

WLDG 1457: Intermediate Shielded Metal Arc Welding

WLDG 1435: Introduction to Pipe Welding—API 1104

WLDG 2406: Intermediate Pipe Welding—ASME Section IX

WLDG 2431: Advanced Blueprint Interpretation and Cost Analysis

WLDG 2435: Advanced Layout and Fabrication

WLDG 2451: Advanced Gas Tungsten Arc Welding

PFPBV 2401: Pipe Fabrication and Installation

 


 

  1. ¼” center punch
  2. ½” cold chisel
  3. 6” speed square
  4. Half-round double-cut file: 12”
  5. Vice Grips™, two 11R each
  6. Pipe wrap: medium size
  7. Replacement grinding disks (1/4”x 4½”)
  8. Bead disk grinding disks (1/8”x4 ½”)
  9. Replacement wire wheels (4 ½”)
  10. Replacement of all worn PPE items from the Introductory List

 


 

These items can be obtained from one of the Austin area welding suppliers:

 

Airgas Southwest

11,111 North Lamar Blvd.

(512) 835-0202

Austin, Texas

On North Lamar between

Kramer and Braker Lanes

 

Precision Oxygen

4927 East 5th Street

385-2247        

Austin, Texas

On East 5th Street four blocks

east of Springdale Road       

Alamo Welding Supply

613 Chicon                 

(512) 476-9400

Austin, Texas             

Eleven blocks east of I-35        

between 6th and 7th Streets

 

 3-D Welding Supply, Inc.

3016 Highway 123

San Marcos, Texas

(512) 396-3926

2.5 miles east of I-35

 

Praxair Distribution

2801 Montopolis Drive

(512) 389-2323

Austin, Texas

On Montpolis north of Ben White Blvd. 

across from the entrance to Sematech

 

Matheson Tri-Gas

3519 East 5th Street              

(512) 385-0611

Austin, Texas                         

At the corner of East 5th Street                

and Springdale Road                              

Texas Welding Supply

4705 Commercial Park Drive

(512) 272-9353

Austin, Texas

East of Highway 183 off Springdale Road

 

Round Rock Welding Supply

1400 North Industrial Boulevard

 (512) 828-3200

Round Rock, Texas

Highway 79 exit, left under I-35, right at Chisolm, second street to left, located behind Gattiland

 

Textbook

Jeffus, Larry, Welding: Principles and Applications, Delmar Publishers, Inc., current edition.

 

This excellent textbook provides a great deal of specific instruction and reference mate­rial on theory and applied welding skills.  It can be purchased at the Riverside Campus Book­store in Building G, or at one of the textbook suppliers on Riverside Drive west of the campus.

 

Examinations

Safety examination: Chapter 2

Mid-term examination: Chapter 5

Final examination: Guided-bend test coupons                                                                                 

Instructor reserves the right to make any changes to the chapter assignments and project list as needed.

                                                        Total Points____________Final Course Grade____________

 

 

 

PROJECT LIST

 

Review of Vee-Groove Open Root on Plate

 

Project Number

Skill

Completion Date

Course Completion

 

      1.   Flat (1G)—E-6010 root and hot passes, then E-7018 fill and cap............................... 10%

 

      2.   Horizontal (2G)—E-6010 root and hot passes, then E-7018 fill and cap..................... 20%

 

      3.   Vertical up (3G)—E-6010 root and hot passes, then E-7018 fill and cap.................... 30%

 

      4.   Overhead (4G)—E-6010 root and hot passes, then E-7018 fill and cap...................... 40%

 

 

 

 

 

 

Beads Around Pipe Surface—Horizontal (2G)

 

Project Number

Skill

Completion Date

Course Completion

 

      5.   Horizontal (2G)............................................................................................................. 50%

 

 

Open-Root Welding—Horizontal (2G)

 

Project Number

Skill

Completion Date

Course Completion

 

      6.   Horizontal (2G)................................................................................... Grade of "D"—60%

 

 

Beads Around Pipe Surface—Vertical Up (5G)

 

Project Number

Skill

Completion Date

Course Completion

 

      7.   Vertical up (5G)................................................................................... Grade of "C"—70%

 

 

Open-Root Welding—Vertical Up (5G)

 

Project Number

Skill

Completion Date

Course Completion

 

      8.   Vertical up (5G)................................................................................... Grade of "B"—80%

 

 

Beads Around Pipe Surface—Vertical Inclined Up (6G)

 

Project Number

Skill

Completion Date

Course Completion

 

      9.   Vertical inclined (6G)................................................................................................... 90%

 

 

Open-Root Welding—Vertical Inclined Up (6G)

 

Project Number

Skill

Completion Date

Course Completion

 

    10.   Vertical inclined (6G)........... All assignments must be completed for grade of “A”—100%

 

 

Calculation of Final Grade

 

Projects......................................... Percent Completed__________% x 60% = __________Points

Examinations................................. Average of Grades__________% x 40% = __________Points

 

Safety examination: Chapter 2

Mid-term examination: Chapter 5

Final examination: Guided-bend test coupons                                                                                 

 

                                                        Total Points____________Final Course Grade____________

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Withdrawal for Excessive Absences

 

WARNING—READ CAREFULLY!  If you accumulate unexcused absences exceeding 10% of the total eighty clock-hours re­quired for this course by the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board, you will be dropped from class.  You will receive the grade of W.  If the final semester withdrawal date has passed, you will receive the grade of F.

 

Your absences will be recorded on the last page of your Projects List presented at the back of this syllabus.  It is your responsibility—not your instructor’s—to keep track of your absences.

 

Excessive absences result in (1) your failure to progress towards the objectives of the course, (2) unfair demands on your instructor's time by taking him/her away from respon­sible students in order to catch you up on missed assignments, and most important (3) you become an increased safety risk due to your diminished familiarity with hazardous equipment and safety protocols.

 

If it becomes necessary for you to withdraw yourself from this course, consult the calendar in the current Course Schedule for the last day to withdraw and still receive the grade of W (approximately two weeks before the end of the semester).  It is not your instructor's responsibility to remind you of this date.  If you are failing and do not withdraw in time, you will be locked in with no way to avoid the final course grade of F.

 

Fall or Spring classes which meet two times per week:

 

First Absence_________________________________

Second Absence______________________________

Third and Final Absence_______________________

 

Fall or Spring classes which meet one time per week:

 

First Absence_________________________________

Second and Final Absence_____________________

 

Summer classes which meet two times per week:

 

First Absence_________________________________

Second and Final Absence_____________________

 


 

WLDG 2406: Intermediate Pipe Welding—ASME Section IX

 

Welding Technology Department

Office: (512) 223-6443

Austin Community College

Austin, Texas  78741

 

Round Rock, Texas 78665

 

SAFETY AGREEMENT

 

By signing my name below, I am attesting that my instructor has made me aware that welding is dangerous if I ignore applicable safety regulations and laboratory policies.  I under­stand that I will acquire the knowledge of these regulations and policies by (1) reading the course syllabus attached to this Safety Agreement, (2) reading the chapters on safety in my text­book (if applicable), (3) ob­serving all safety and warning signs posted in the laboratories and classroom, and (4) attending in-class safety demonstrations on equipment and shop practices given by my instructor through­out the course.  I understand that it is my responsibility to attend class regularly, be alert to my surroundings, and remain constantly vigilant to the risks of working in an industrial envi­ronment.  I understand that “safe practice” is the discretionary interpretation of my instructor, and that if I fail to adhere to these requirements—including the attendance policy outlined in the syllabus—I will be considered a safety risk to myself and others and I may be withdrawn or possibly fail the course.

 

 

 

Student (print name)_______________________ Student (signature)__________________________

 

Student Phone____________________________ Student Email______________________________

 

Instructor________________________________ Year______________________________________

 

­­

Emergency

Contact Person____________________________ Emergency Phone___________________________